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When you fixed / replaced your cars clock, what option did you chose ?

did you fix your OEM piece ?

Replace your OEM with a quartz movement ?

or

maybe replace your clock with a battery powered clock fitted in the OEM place??

Where did you buy your replacement ??

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it may be covered in the manual, but do these require a daily wind ?

No. There is a small coil in there that winds it automatically about every 20 minutes. After winding, the points (that were closed to apply power to the coil) are opened back up automatically. These points frequently get corroded. Then the coil does not energize. Bill mentioned above that he cleaned his points. You can do that with a points file, then perhaps take the mechanism to a watchsmith to clean/lube for you.

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Just like any other bolt or nut. Righty tighty - Lefty Loosey. Turn it counterclockwise to get it out. Once you've filed the points and lubed it, it's easy to check out. There are two terminals on the back. The one rivieted directly to the body is the ground. The one with the insulator between the terminial and the body is for 12V. When you take the clock out, it's not like the other gauges, it has actual wires going to it, not part of the circuit board, plus the light is on a wire of it's own. So you'll have three wires dangling from the hole when the clock is out.

To test whether you've got it working without reinstalling it. Take a couple of jumper wires and if you have one, a 12V battery from a cordless drill or something. You can use the car battery, but that can be a hassle.

Ground the ground terminal and wire to the - post, hold the 12V wire to the 12V terminal, then touch the 12V wire to the + post of the battery. Listen carefully, you should hear the main spring wind. You don't have to hold the 12V wire to the battery any longer. You'll see and hear the mechanical part of the clock working.

All the 12V does is wind the mainspring. 12V is cut out of the circuit until the main spring completely unwinds by disconnecting the points. When it winds down, the points will touch and you'll get a zap of 12v that will wind the spring again and disconnect the points.

Every time you adjust the clock if it's running slow or fast, the clock makes adjustments. Once you've wound it forward and backward a few times it will eventually get the correct time.

If you have a battery disconnect of some kind, you'll want to make sure that you have a way to keep the clock running. If you have to reset it everytime you reconnect your battery, you're going to have to go through the process of it running slow/fast until you get it evened out again.

Ed

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Just like any other bolt or nut. Righty tighty - Lefty Loosey. Turn it counterclockwise to get it out. Once you've filed the points and lubed it, it's easy to check out. There are two terminals on the back. The one rivieted directly to the body is the ground. The one with the insulator between the terminial and the body is for 12V. When you take the clock out, it's not like the other gauges, it has actual wires going to it, not part of the circuit board, plus the light is on a wire of it's own. So you'll have three wires dangling from the hole when the clock is out.

To test whether you've got it working without reinstalling it. Take a couple of jumper wires and if you have one, a 12V battery from a cordless drill or something. You can use the car battery, but that can be a hassle.

Ground the ground terminal and wire to the - post, hold the 12V wire to the 12V terminal, then touch the 12V wire to the + post of the battery. Listen carefully, you should hear the main spring wind. You don't have to hold the 12V wire to the battery any longer. You'll see and hear the mechanical part of the clock working.

All the 12V does is wind the mainspring. 12V is cut out of the circuit until the main spring completely unwinds by disconnecting the points. When it winds down, the points will touch and you'll get a zap of 12v that will wind the spring again and disconnect the points.

Every time you adjust the clock if it's running slow or fast, the clock makes adjustments. Once you've wound it forward and backward a few times it will eventually get the correct time.

If you have a battery disconnect of some kind, you'll want to make sure that you have a way to keep the clock running. If you have to reset it everytime you reconnect your battery, you're going to have to go through the process of it running slow/fast until you get it evened out again.

Ed

Thanks Ed,

A very informative reply...:)

I'm gonna save this one !

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I did like Mr. Bill Stoneberg, took mine out , cleaned the points, added a couple of drops of three in one oil and it works great keeps good time. Once I saw the inside with all the gears ,wheels, springs and how they all work together i thought it was just too mechanically beautiful not to try and fix it.

Suerte,

Arnulfo

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Did the same thing like everyone else, cleaned it, lubed it and it worked fine.

I think I'll try that first too, see if I can't get the old girl tickin' again. From what you guys say, sounds like I have a good chance of reviving the old clock again, good deal !!

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My clock wasn't working on my 63. When it took it apart I noticed there was a small wire that was suppose to be attached to a flat brass piece. Five minutes with a soldering iron and my 49 year old clock is ticking like new. Saved me $100 conversion and way cooler operating.

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Hi,

I'm trying to remove my clock from my '64 and based on this thread I'm assuming that it comes out from the front (i.e. not via the back with the dash pad removed). I ask because mine doesn't appear to want to move and I'm trying to determine whether I need to use more force or whether I'm on the path to breaking it.

Thanks.

Eric.

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Turn the clock housing counter clockwise. It is held in by spring clips. The hardest part is trying to get a grip on the gol darn thing. See if your wife doesn't have a rubber jar lid opener to grip it with.

Ed

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Yes, thanks. I just had to really get in there and it finally gave way.

Once I removed it I used a light oil to lubricate the moving parts and cleaned the points as others pointed out. In just a short while I had it working once again. Thanks to the input from this forum there is one more Riv in the world with a working original clock.

I've attached a couple of photos which may help illustrate the descriptions provided by others in this thread. The first photo shows the two terminals in the back that Jim described, the second photo attempts to show the points located in the workings.

Thanks to all.

Eric

post-85697-143138998557_thumb.jpg

post-85697-143138998591_thumb.jpg

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No. There is a small coil in there that winds it automatically about every 20 minutes. After winding, the points (that were closed to apply power to the coil) are opened back up automatically. These points frequently get corroded. Then the coil does not energize. Bill mentioned above that he cleaned his points. You can do that with a points file, then perhaps take the mechanism to a watchsmith to clean/lube for you.

A points file ??

You need a special tool to clean those points or will a small similiar file do ??

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Yes, thanks. I just had to really get in there and it finally gave way.

Once I removed it I used a light oil to lubricate the moving parts and cleaned the points as others pointed out. In just a short while I had it working once again. Thanks to the input from this forum there is one more Riv in the world with a working original clock.

I've attached a couple of photos which may help illustrate the descriptions provided by others in this thread. The first photo shows the two terminals in the back that Jim described, the second photo attempts to show the points located in the workings.

Thanks to all.

Eric

Thanks for the pix, very helpful....

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A points file ??

You need a special tool to clean those points or will a small similiar file do ??

The points don't separate too much. A points file is quite thin and not too coarse.

A points file was standard issue tool during the era of points ignition in cars, to dress the points a bit rather then replace them. I have had one i my toolbox for a long time.

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Thanks guys,

I got my clock working, lubed the gears some, cleaned the points with a small piece of emery cloth, and touched the battery terminals..:) Now I just need to find out why I don't have power to the plug that goes to the back of the clock...

Edited by Kingoftheroad (see edit history)
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After simply replacing a fuse, I got the clock & everything back together & working..:) Its ticking away.

Its unbelievable !! The quality put into this car, an OEM clock (with only a little maintenance) working after almost 50 yrs...

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Turn the clock housing counter clockwise. It is held in by spring clips. The hardest part is trying to get a grip on the gol darn thing. See if your wife doesn't have a rubber jar lid opener to grip it with.

Ed

I have also had luck pushing the plastic lid from a spray can over the tapered bezel of the clock and then turning the lid.

It helps to get in there if you remove the bezels from around the speedometer and the instruments to the left and right of the clock. They get in your way, preventing you from getting in getting a grip on the clock. The bezels are held on by a small allen screw along the underside of each one.

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Turn the clock housing counter clockwise. It is held in by spring clips. The hardest part is trying to get a grip on the gol darn thing. See if your wife doesn't have a rubber jar lid opener to grip it with.

Ed

A wide band rubber band will work too.

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I timed mine and the points make contact every 85 seconds. I'm sure there is a good amount of variance in the distance between the points in the various clocks, but for my '64 there is no way it would be at 20 minutes. If they were bent further apart then perhaps it could be two minutes, but not much more.

Eric.

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  • 1 month later...

Well, I did as instructed and it worked for 20 seconds. I haven't been near the car for nearly 2 months. Drove it last weekend and to my amazement the clock was working perfectly??

Thanks for this thread it has been very helpful.

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I've seen Neat's Foot oil at the local Ace Hardware. That's the stuff I used to use 50 years ago to work a pocket into a new ball glove. I've never heard of it used on machinery though. From what I've read, it tends to leave a film that would collect dust and it will dry and get crusty; I don't think you'd want that in a clock. Were there anyother recommendations?

Do your own Google search and make sure it's what you want to use then call a clock maker in your area and ask what he'd recommend.

Ed

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what oil are you guys using?? the ROA page says Neets Foot oil, which I dont have a clue where to get. There has to be a more procurable option

I just used a little bit of oil I had in one of my general purpose oil cans. A little of that oil on a toothpick and my clock has been working great ever since...

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Neat's foot oil is for leather. Find it a shoe or boot repair shop. More likely a saddlery. Not exactly on every corner, even in the wild west of OKC. I have an old bottle of Singer Sewing Machine Oil that I have had for years. Use two or three drops a year on various things like this. I would recommend something like that.

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  • 1 year later...
Just like any other bolt or nut. Righty tighty - Lefty Loosey. Turn it counterclockwise to get it out. Once you've filed the points and lubed it, it's easy to check out. There are two terminals on the back. The one rivieted directly to the body is the ground. The one with the insulator between the terminial and the body is for 12V. When you take the clock out, it's not like the other gauges, it has actual wires going to it, not part of the circuit board, plus the light is on a wire of it's own.

Ed

hi Ed,

I am a bit confused about the way to remove the clock. As you stated in the quote to turn the clock clockwise to get it out, later on in this thread i read that is should be done counterclockwise.

Am I missing something?

Thanks in advance!

Martin

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Yeah, you're missing something. In the third sentence of my quote I write "Turn in counterclockwise to get it out." That's the same as the 2nd sentence - "righty tighty - lefty loosey." Just re-read it and you'll be on the right track.

Ed

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Hi Ed,

Sorry for my blindness.

Currently I am exploring this endless forum, I think I am having a overflow of info. Almost everything is new to me, including reading and understanding what you all are telling.

I am having great fun over here!

Thank you for your answer, tomorrow I wil give it a try removing the clock for cleaning and lubricating.

Best regards.

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