gavinnz

Speedster proportions and design thoughts

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IMHO, the trick is to take all the "truck" out of a build, if you're starting with one.  Or at least as much as possible.  

Make it short, stripped down, and light.

 

 

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The Chalmers based car looks very nice but is of course built to much smaller proportions than even the smallest ALF.  Even the early Aero engine cars were almost always based on a large car rather than a small truck.  ALF's are interesting, have a big T head engine and chain drive, and are at least somewhat available.  They are still trucks and require pretty extensive modifications to make them more car like.  The one directly above looks great.

  The one at the top with the Bentley wheels  also looks great.  There are a few companies that make wire wheels and hubs to order. I would imagine that provided a person is able to pay the final bill any of the Rudge style wheels and hubs can be remanufactured. There is a Co. in either Australia or N.Z. that has a great web site, and would appear to do top notch work.

 

Greg in Canada

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Here are a couple of pictures of a 1925 Buick Master 6 speedster my father built about 25 years ago. He styled as close as he could to a Stutz Bearcat. post-102972-0-98904800-1443393198_thumb.post-102972-0-76636100-1443393414_thumb.

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While not entirely a speedster I have been sketching up a tourabout that I feel has about the right proportions. 

 

Also I am working on a late 20's speedster and the rough sketch is close to what Im working out.  I didn't spend that much time on the sketch.

 

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Gavin,

Kissel manufactured some really beautiful production speedsters, as did Daniels, Stutz, and Marmon. Google "Kissel Speedster" and you'll get a lot of pics.

Below is a picture of what is said to be a custom built 1918 period Kissel Speedster. I cannot determine if it is actually based on a Kissel, but its neat!

Ron Hausmann P.E.

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I was just idly flicking through Dyke's 1930 and came across Instruction No. 81. It is 12 pp. and here are the first three for your delectation.

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I had not been through a Dykes of 1930.  That looks like some sound professional instruction.  I also noticed on the American-LaFrance speedster shown by genebe above, he must have tried a couple of different gearing shanges as the drive sprockets are different sized in each picture.  If genebe checks here, how about a comment about eh drive sprockets?

Al

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