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Silicon bronze welding MIG wire


Guest tommygfunk

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Guest tommygfunk

Well I’ve been doing body work since I was 10, but in 96 I had to stop because of medical reasons, but I have gotten back into it over the last few years. Well I ran out of MIG wire yesterday [standard 0.30] and went to buy more. The guy at the weld shop told me about silicon bronze welding MIG wire for doing sheet metal work so I put off buying anything until I researched this. Many moons ago I used a like rod for my first time using a TIG, but never heard of using it in a MIG for body work. Have you guys and gales ever used this in a tig? If so let me know how this went. I just think I have been way out of the loop.

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Guest tommygfunk

I’m hoping to find a local shop that uses it and maybe I can sit in on a weld. I have dozens open dozens of pinholes in my gate so I’m looking for a soft grind easy flow. I’d love a TIG but I just can’t afford anything extra.

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Guest tommygfunk

I’m going to a shop Tuesday that swears by it. I never knew that it was so prevalent in new car construction until I went to ICAR’s site. I’m going to see what I think and maybe if I’m impressed I’ll pick up a 2lb roll and see for myself. Thanks for the input!

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I see no application for Silicon Bronze brazing in antique body work. Bronze is brittle and paint doesn't like to stick to it. What are you trying to gain by using it? Properly done MIG welds are not brittle and are no harder to grind and finish than SB.

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Less strength than steel, not recommended for butt joints, cost well over 3 times that of steel MIG wire, I just fail to see what the advantage would be. I would also like to see evidence that as stated paint and primer adheres better to bronze than it does to brass. The primary metal in both is copper. We use silicon bronze castings on a regular basis but not sure why you would use it on sheet steel.

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Silicon Bronze welding is used on newer cars apparently because they are made of high strength heat treated steels. The heat treating would be lost if welded normally. While SB melts at a lower temp than mig wire it still requires 1750 degrees or so to flow so the possibility of distortion of the steel isn't that much less than regular MIG or TIG welding using steel wire.

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Guest tommygfunk

Well I had the great pleasure to work with a gentleman who put to rest many of the myths of silicon bronze welding for me. Over the last few days he showed that silicon bronze is excellent to use in several situations in not only modern car repair, but it is very useful in classic car restoration. His 50 plus years as a body man and his willingness to teach me some new tricks was well worth it. As far as this being a brittle weld in what he demonstrated to me was a weld that did not fail, but held to the point of tearing the metal. He attributes the brittle welds to operators turning up the heat to high, but that is his opinion. I had no problem filling the pinholes and even the larger holes in my gate and the heat dissertation was minimal. As far as the finishing of metal and primer adhering to it well it looks good from here. His welding and body skills are phenomenal and that is that. He has hung quarters and made many a patch panel, but like a few of you have said it is not for frame or floor pan replacement. As far as the cost yes it is more expensive, but if you feel that should stop you from well you have already made your decision against it. I feel that after doing body work for as long as I have it was nice to learn more about it then just condemning it and moving on. I honestly loved to do lead work too. But body filler pushed that to the side.

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Guest tommygfunk

In what I used it for on my gate and the extreme ease that it flowed into the pinholes and even the larger holes with the added use of a copper spoon I would say yes it was well worth the extra $9 dollars I paid per pound over the standard steel MIG wire. Since a TIG would cost much more then the SB wire I would say that the ease of use and the finish time being half of what I would have invested into the gate made it worth it to me. I have a few patch areas on the RQP’s that I will do next!<O:p</O:p

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