GaWajn

1952 Pontiac Catalina

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Looking at the label on the can ... they have it marked as ... ''1965-1967 Chevrolet Butternut Yellow''. Could be a mistake ... I will try to sort that out ...

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The rest of the frame was blasted this AM, and the rust encapsulator from Eastwood was sprayed onto the frame ...

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... should be ready for some bodywork this PM ...

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I used some sprayable polyester on the frame pits ...

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... I quickly realised that this stuff will work best as a finisher. The pits on the frame are too coarse for this stuff and will need some real body filler ...

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... it did fix some of the smaller pits though ...

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I did my paint test also ...

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... I like it ... pretty darn close to what I am looking for ...

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here you see the test card after three coats ... the yellow color seems off because the camera has a hard time with shadows ...

Looks like I will be needing four coats over a white primer sealer ... for good coverage ...

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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Looking at the label on the can ... they have it marked as ... ''1965-1967 Chevrolet Butternut Yellow''. Could be a mistake ... I will try to sort that out ...

No it's right. Butternut. Buttercup would be closer to lemon yellow.

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Two small spots needed some welding filling ... got that out of the way ...

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... there was a smallish kink in the X part of the frame ... got the hydraulic gear to sort that out ...

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... didn't need much of a push to get everything lined up again ...

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Bodywork almost done ...

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... final coat of primer ...

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... hopefully ... tomorrow ... paint!

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I had wanted to spray the paint myself ... but I quickly realized that if I wanted a good paint job ... then someone with more experience than me should do the spraying ...

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... first coat was very glossy ... I didn't care for it so we added some flattening agent to make it a semi gloss ...

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... it is still wet ... but you can notice it becoming duller as it dries ...

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... We are going to leave it to cure over the weekend and wait for Monday morning before moving it.

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I agree with dulling the black out some. Too many people use gloss black on frame and inner fender panels. The factory never used gloss, so it isn't original looking.

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The information I have found is that the factory did indeed paint the frames a gloss black, but that the paint quality was such that it dulled in a short amount of time. Many sources have told me that both gloss and semi gloss are both correct and simulate a factory finish ... although with a modern gloss paint ... it will remain glossy for quite as long time, and not dull like the original.

Just because I found this information does not mean that it is 100% correct. Even though I will probably never have this car in a judged event, I wish someone who is a judge would chime in here and give us a ruling as far as what the judges look for in this case. Are both gloss and semi accepted in this case? Is the information about the factory gloss painted frames I have found correct also?

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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Next up on the program ... get the rear end restored, to be able to install into the newly painted frame.

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... looks like a seal will need replacing ...

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... U bolts came off easily enough ...

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... next up is the removal of the leaf spring covers ...

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... I lightly tapped the locking edge over to open it up a bit ...

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... then used a screwdriver to pry the lip upwards ...

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... the burlap material is pretty much toasted ... leafs are in good condition ... even the covers are not too bad ...

... the options open to me are ...having the rear springs re-arched ... or buy new units ... which mean that the covers will not be reused. I need to do this because I will be getting new coil springs for the front, and if I do nothing for the rear suspension ... the back end of the car will be significantly lower than it needs to be ...

I am off the the spring specialty shop to find out what is possible ... availability of new springs ... prices etc ...

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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Just got back from the spring specialty shop ... oddly enough ... named ''SPRING SPECIALTY''. I talked to the old fella about re-arching my springs. He told me he would be glad to take my money and re-arch my springs ... but ... from his experience ... the re-arching process does not last. He said that within a year or two ... the re-arched springs lose about half to 3/4 of the re-arch. It does not last. He talked about changing the main and maybe the second leaf ... that would get me in the ball park. His recommendation was to get new springs, especially when you factor in the cost involved in reconditioning the old ones. I had looked online at some prices and here is what I found.

First place ... $430 US plus $190 shipping (WHAT???) to Maine ... does not ship to Canada. So I need to drive six hours total to go get them and cross the border. So that's about an extra $80 in fuel. TOTAL = $700 US aprox.

Second place ... $559 US plus $94.50 shipping to the Maine border ... same deal ... does not ship to Canada, so tack on $80 for fuel and a wasted day. TOTAL = $733 US aprox.

My local Spring Specialty shop will sell me a pair for $534 CAN plus $70.00 tax (shipping is included). And the springs come from the USA. Dayton I think. TOTAL = $604 Canadian, and didn't waste any time and supported my local shop. They are ordered and will be here in a week or so. They will also custom make some new U bolts for me at a reasonable price. It's all good.

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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Interesting comment on the price differences, Our government signed a Fred Trade agreement with USA and this is the result !!!!!!.

Quite comment that parts cannot be shipped to Canada as we are not a big customer of USA. We love to buy USA oil and ship it to Ontario!!

Just a thought!!

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I got a little contract work coming my way ... will be busy for the next three weeks or so ... back to the project after that ...

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Picked up my springs today. Number 80-197 ... cost landed to me ... $603.42 Canadian. They are coated with some kind of undercoating, so i will not be painting them ... just leaving them as they came.

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U bolts were made to measure on the spot ... cost $35.93 ... Canadian ...

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Here you can see the difference in spring arch ... the old ones were quite tired I think ...

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... for some reason ... non of the spring places included the bushings that get pressed into the leaf ... at the shackle end. I will have to get some pressed when the time comes to mount the unit onto the frame.

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I am not 100% sure that the ''Butternut Yellow'' is my final choice for the main paint color of my car. From what I can understand ... it is a color from the mid sixties. It is nice ... but maybe not quite there ...

I have posted topics in the Buick and Cadillac areas, to see if anyone out there has a modern paint code for the 1949-50-51 Buick ''OLD IVORY'' 1953 Buick ''OSAGE CREAM'', 1953 Cadillac ''ARTISAN OCHRE'' , and 1954 Cadillac ''APOLLO GOLD''. I will see if I get any information from these topics. I have looked at pictures of cars with these colors and they are all very nice

1950 Buick

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1953 Buick

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1953 Cadillac

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1954 Cadillac

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Butternut Yellow ...

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Of course ... these pics were taken from a google search and the acuracy of the colors is questionable .. but it is a good start ...

I think my favorite is the 53 caddy yellow ...

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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My choice, based on the pictures, which as you note, colour can be distored from screen to screen (I was an imaging professional for many years, so I know better than most), would be either the '50 Buick, or the Caddy. I like the apparent richness of the yellow on those cars, without it looking too bold. Though it is a very personal choice, there's really no right or wrong.

Keith

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Of course ... there is the 1951 Malibu Ivory

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... and the 1950 San Pedro Ivory ...

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Don't know what color this convertible is ... but it is nice ...

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If I can't get any information about a modern formulation for the older paint colors ... then I will use the Butternut Yellow from the mid sixties ...

Edited by GaWajn (see edit history)

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Great thread! I had a 1951 chieftain as my first car so your pictures bring back lots of memories.

Terry

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Welcome TerryB. Glad you like this place.

I have had a response from someone about the 54 APOLLO GOLD color. Seems like it has been formulated by the PPG guys. I will check with my local PPG guy and see what he can do for me. I believe that Canada has the same laws as California regarding auto paint ... that might put a damper in things ... we will see what he has to say about the matter.

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Found a visor for my car. It was advertised for a 52 (Canadian) Chevy ... but I believe that it is the same as the Pontiac ones from the era. If it is not ... then I will have a visor for sale :confused:

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... looks to be in pretty good condition ... just a couple of minor dings ...

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The information I have found is that the factory did indeed paint the frames a gloss black, but that the paint quality was such that it dulled in a short amount of time. Many sources have told me that both gloss and semi gloss are both correct and simulate a factory finish ... although with a modern gloss paint ... it will remain glossy for quite as long time, and not dull like the original.

Just because I found this information does not mean that it is 100% correct. Even though I will probably never have this car in a judged event, I wish someone who is a judge would chime in here and give us a ruling as far as what the judges look for in this case. Are both gloss and semi accepted in this case? Is the information about the factory gloss painted frames I have found correct also?

Most, if not all vehicle frames were produced by the A. O. Smith Corporation in Milwaukee, WI, prior to the advent of unibody technology. I can recall waiting at railroad crossings, in the back seat of my dad's '57 Olds, watching the endless caravan of flat cars with stacks of frames, I believe ten high, going southbound, heading for Detroit and elsewhere. I think that some may also have been sent by boat across Lake Michigan. Anyway, my vague recollection of these frames is that they were painted gloss black. Now, depending on how long they sat in a rail yard, or in other storage, (there was no such thing as "just in time" production strategy), the paint probably had ample time to fade prior to being assembled into an automobile. The company still exists, so if they have a historian on hand, perhaps some light can be shed on my darkened memory, about what was actually used. If I should happen to bump into an A. O. Smith retiree, I'll ask him.

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