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scott12180

Using a rim spreader to mounting tire

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Hi all --

I am mounting new tires to my 1924 Franklin. The car has 23" wheels using split rims. I have a rim spreader.

The theory is to make the tire slip on easier to a collapsed rim, then expand it to normal size. But even with the rim spreader I worked on the thing for about a hour until I finally got it. And I've got three tires to go still !

Dam but that was hard. There's got to be a right way to do this but darned if I know what it is !

Any advice on WHERE to position the three arms of the rim spreader? Say if the split is at the 12 o'clock position, where do I want the three arms?

--Scott

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Go to the Club website, click on TECH<TECH><TECH>, click on 2006, scroll down to Sept. 26 and poke around, there is a copy of "Directions for Operating ATLAS RIM TOOL". They are very specific and if not followed you stand a good chance of distorting the rim.

Gordon Howard

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Gee Scott, if you had come to Rhinebeck, I did a demonstration of a rim spreader and mounted a tire for Joe A in the parking lot.

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Look at the #113 Sept 2006 Franklin Service Station; " Changing Split Rim Tires"

4 illustrations showing where to put arms. and 3 pgs of text

Edited by Franklin31
addition (see edit history)

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Thanks for your help, Franklin31 --- much appreciated.

Yes, I looked up Service Station 113 and saw the write-up on split rims. I had to laugh because Tim spends a lot of time on removing the tire and mounting the new tire, but quickly glosses over expanding the rim . That was the hardest part ! I could do everything else with ease, but it was that last 1/4 inch to lock the rim that blew me away...

The other thing is Tim did not mention lubricating the tire and rim before mounting. Is that so obvious that it doesn't need to be mentioned? Well, I learned the hard way. I think it's essential. (The first time I mounted a motorcycle tire I did not lubricate and encountered the same impossible situation. After much complaining to friends, the next try used lots of dish detergent. The thing slid on so easily I was dumbfounded.)

Also, in the drawings Tim places the rim spreader exactly opposite to what others have recommended. . . . I guess that means any orientation is OK as long as it works !

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Scott an hour per wheel sounds about right and a little cussing goes a long way!

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I should finish this thread by saying that I did get it figured out. The key ---- the ABSOLUTE secret --- is to use plenty of lubrication to slide the rubber onto the rim. It's astounding how well dry rubber sticks to the rim. A little lubricant makes a world of difference. Takes me maybe ten minutes to do a tire now with a decent rim spreader.

I used a paste-like substance called (something like) Euro paste or Euro Lube. The guy talked me into it at the auto parts store. I'd have to look at the thing again for the exact name, but it really did work very well. It's an glycol-based lubricant that eventually dries helping to seat the bead, but also has a rust inhibitors. Dish detergent may be OK but I question the residue. This gallon-sized tub cost me maybe $13 and ought to last the for rest of my life.

So now the 10-B has four new shoes and a new spare.

Oh, and it helped to use new rims which I got from Universal. I figured to buy them while they are available. . .

--Scott

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Thanks for the valuable information. I'm going to be doing this for my '21 9B touring.

A question: the new rims from Universal - where they 23" plain split rims? Did you buy the 3 or 4 mm version?

Thanks.

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The rims from Universal were the 4mm version.

The 3mm type was in the correct original width (2.76 inches) but they called back and said that they were out of stock or something (I forget) but said that the 3mm was a marginal thickness anyway. He recommended the 4mm thickness which came in at slightly wider than original (2.83 inches) . I agreed, bought them, and found they are slightly wider but still work out fine. If anything it gives a "firmer" wider profile to the tire, and the mounting was not effected. They look good on the car -- give it a beefier appearance without being oversized.

I didn't measure to verify the thickness of the original versus the new rims --- but 1 mm is a little hard to tell without a direct comparison.

I recall years ago the advice to buy any rims when you saw them at flea markets because the originals tended to rust. That was before new rims were available. With new rims on the market, I recommend that you buy them if you can and save your originals for spares. Eventually they will not be available anymore.

And besides, once you get your old tires off and look at those original rims you may find one or two (or three or even four) that are pretty buggered from 90 years of ham-fisted wrenching. I only had two really good original rims out of five.

--Scott

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