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A Chapter, a Region's Asset or Liability?


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I have heard rumors that a Model "A" club, about 30 miles away, is considering associating with the AACA in hopes of attracting more members. Since they would be within our 50 mile radius, my understanding is that they would either become a chapter of our Region or we would have to vote to allow them to become a separate Region. Is this correct?<P>If so, what are the plusses and minuses of the options? Would Chapter members also have to be Region members who would also have to be National members? Have any Regions wished that they had no Chapters or any Chapters wished that they were independant Regions?<P>I'm not looking for answers contained in the Policies & Procedures Manual, I'm looking for real life experiences. Thanks....

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Ron, if we had a few hours and as many beers, I could tell you a lot about this question. You have apparently read the P&P Manual so I will not repeat what is in there.<P>We have had many cases where new clubs had to make the decision to become a chapter and in all cases as far as I can remember, they do have to pay some region dues as well as the obvious requirement for each member to be an AACA member. We have also have had the case where a new club or established chapter wanted region status within the "boundary" of an existing region. If there is no objection from the region, the request is usually granted. However, in numerous cases the region did not grant their agreement and the subject became very contentious. These have been handled with a careful and thorough review by the AACA Regions Committee and the National Board. Some requests have been granted and some have not.<P>The term "region" was intially used early in AACA history and a means to get membership in a region of the country. The first region included four states and later was just one state when the other three states split off. At this time there are only three regions which claim a state area. All AACA affiliates in Lousiana are chapters in the Louisiana Region. The North Carolina Region and Ohio Region have many chapters, however there are some separate regions within their state boundaries,<P>Hopefully there will be other responses which will give you more input, but for the most part it comes down to the relationship between the two groups. If it is good the region-chapter relationship can work well. If it is antagonistic, it is hell on wheels. <P>Sally just called for supper so I'll check out for the time being. Hope you get some more responses.

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Ron,<P>I am a little surprised that no one other than Ron has answered you yet. Let me see if I add a little something.<P>Before the Brass-Nickel, I was involved in the NC Region. As a matter of fact, I was secretary/treasurer for 12 years. As Father Ron said, the NC Region is one of the few Regions that have chapters. It was chartered in October 1954 but did not accept its first chapter until 1964. Since then it has as many as 20 chapters. When first chartered, it covered most of the state going from the mountains to coast. For a long time, it was the only Region in NC. Over time, it has lost chapters and also picked up chapters. Currently in NC, there are 10 Regions.<P>1. Alamance Region *<BR>2. Brass-Nickel Touring Region (non-geographical) *<BR>3. Foothills Region * <BR>4. Great Smokey Mountains Region<BR>5. Hornet?s Region *<BR>6. Mid-Carolina Antique Drivers Region<BR>7. Mountaineer Region *<BR>8. NC Region<BR>9. Transylvania Region<BR>10. Zooland Region *<P>* - Started first as chapter of the North Carolina Region<P>There are many pluses and minuses on both sides of the issues. With the chapter structure, another layer is added to everything. Every chapter member must be a member of National and then the Region. Your paperwork also doubles, as you need to report your roster and officers to mother Region also. The additional layer of dues something hinders recruitment. When people are really only interested on participating on the local lever, it is a hard sell to require an additional $15 (inaddition to the national dues) before they may join the chapter. You also have an additional layer of by-laws and regulations that you must follow. On the plus side, there is usually a Region newsletter which co-ordinates the information from the various chapters. When fighting legislation issues, it is the fastest and easiest way to contact a large number of people. The Region usually offers its members additional activities that they may participate in ? shows, tours, picnics, and so on. <P>There are also many reasons for conversions. Triangle Chapter, which was chartered in 1964 under the North Carolina Region, was first its own Region. Originally chartered in 1961, Triangle asked to be taken in under the umbrella of the NC Region in 1964. It is the only case I know of where a Region converted to a chapter. (I am sure there must be others). I was on the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Region when most of these conversions took place. A common reason was the aforesaid additional layer of dues. Sometimes the conversion was sparked because of a back lash to a Region regulation or by-law. There are many different reasons why. Maybe some people that have been involved in a conversion will share why their club did it.<P>The Brass-Nickel converted from a chapter to a Region because we never should have been chartered as a chapter. Because we are a touring club that focuses its attention on cars made in 1931 or earlier, we were chartered non-geographical. Because you are restricting membership, non-geographical status allows you to broaden your membership base, which is good. However, by being a chapter of geographical region this advantage was defeated as every members had to belong to the mother region. Basically, we were a reduced to regular chapter status. <P>I hope this all makes sense and answered some of your questions.<p>[ 04-08-2002: Message edited by: 24T42 ]

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