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That's great stuff but I would like to see them use the equipment of the day. In 1910 I would like to see the machine that cut those bores! No micrometers back then just gage blocks and calipers. I would like to go back in time and shake their hand. Real Craftsman!

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That's great stuff but I would like to see them use the equipment of the day. In 1910 I would like to see the machine that cut those bores! No micrometers back then just gage blocks and calipers. I would like to go back in time and shake their hand. Real Craftsman!

Id like to go back ( and stay back ) and shake alot of hands

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Looks like the heavy beam gauge arm can be moved around over the top of the block. The gauge tip can be seen under the arm, coming down near the valve seat area. He is probably measuring the hardness of the valve seat area on the gauge. I would think that because of the apparent tedium of this process, this may be some of the reasoning to use hardened valve seat inserts in later production instead of testing each block for a particular hardness at the seat area. Just throw in some hardened valve seats and only worry about block hardness inside the cylinders.

Whada' ya think, Bill?

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Alot of these salesmans data books were embelished greatly, testing each and every block would be in my opinion a stretch.

I would guess ( and only a guess ) that the machinine can test its hardness by its density and it does this by measuring waves or vibrations traveling thru the block.

Hopefully someone with more experience will give Ray ( and all of us ) a better explanation.

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The block is sitting on a machined table on top of a set of parallels. The arm do-dad with an indicator resembles a dial height gage to measure block height. Could be just a stock photo used. Today we have a hand held electronic device that shoots a steel ball onto the steel and converts the bounce to rockwell standard. Another way to check hardness is spark testing.

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I have finished reading the book but before I put it away here are a few more.

The connecting rod bearing procedure is pretty clear, I have read other literature about this spinning in the past.

I always enjoy the press photos, what a treat it would be to see these in operation

post-48869-143138947243_thumb.jpg

post-48869-143138947252_thumb.jpg

post-48869-143138947261_thumb.jpg

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I don't know if you tried it already, but type "dodge" into the search box on that Old Motor page and you get some interesting period photos/stories of the Brothers.

Might be my outdated web browser but I do not see a search box, can someone tell me where it is?

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Today we have a hand held electronic device that shoots a steel ball onto the steel and converts the bounce to rockwell standard. Another way to check hardness is spark testing.

You probably know, but the steel ball indenter has been replaced by tungsten carbide these days..;)

As a machinist, I expect you can tell one type of steel from another by the spark shape. I respect that kind of experience.

Ray.

Edited by R.White (see edit history)
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Along the left side about 1/2 way down, in the webpage border menu. Just above the "Categories". Odd place.

Thanks, I see it now but I guess it just does not like my puter

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