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1936 dodge 4 door sedan restoration start


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The tank looks pretty good but I see that it's missing about a 4 in. spout on the filler neck. I would have it cleaned well and then seal it with one of the good tank sealers. The fuel lines are just standard 1/4 in. brake lines that you'll have to bend and fit. It's held along the ouside of the frame with several clips. To remove the fuel pump, disconnect the fuel lines,remove the sediment bowl glass and empty(optional). Remove the 2 bolts and pull the pump out of the block. It may have a tendency to push down because of the actuator arm pressing against the camshaft, if it does just pull up a little on the pump until it's loose enough to remove. On the wheel cylinders, if there is any pitting in the sleeves they should be replaced . The fronts are available at NAPA (United no.3494/3495) but the rears will have to be resleeved. I had White Post Restorations rebuild mine. It's best to replace all lines regardless of the type of fluid used. You might have a little trouble using the original "banjo" fittings on the rear wheels and the original block fitting on the front. Make sure you use new copper washers on the "banjo" bolts. What happens sometimes is that the old line fittings leave a "footprint" in the seats of the brass fittings. If you make your own lines(which you probably will) the new flare seats cut into the fittings differently and may leak around that area. On the tank line question,I think that there is a short pick up line that extends into the tank near the bottom for better fuel pickup by the pump.

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Thanks for the info Jpage. The Tank did have another section of tube but that came off during the removal. (It was loose on the tank) I think it was press fit. Amigo.. since you have a filler neck in 1 piece can you tell me if it's something that is rigid? It looks like it might have been free to spin. Maybe a light tig job would bring it together. I'll try to remove the sending unit and see if there is a tube that goes down ... not sure if there would be issues striping and sealing the tank. I have the por 15 kit on my list.

Does anyone know if the sending units are serviceable? I suppose it wouldn't be worth if it's faulty. I'll stop by Napa and get a long length of 1/4 and some hardware. Should have a working fuel system this week! Thanks guys.

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There is no tube on the sending unit. There is a wire arm that carries a cork float that goes up and down with the gasoline. You can check the sender by hooking it up to a battery and a good fuel gauge,then by working the arm and watching to see if the gauge moves. New sending units are available that will work if your old unit is bad. You may have to replace the old cork float ,may I suggest a plastic one because of the ethanol in the gasoline may destroy the cork(or so I'm told). You might be able to resolder the extension onto the filler neck. If you use a sealer,make sure the tank is very clean inside and that you get the sealcoat on all the surfaces. There is a baffle in the center of the tank that can give you fits when trying to slosh that stuff around. Also,make sure it's completely dry before putting any fuel in the tank. I opted to have a new tank made at a local tinsmith shop,the man matched it perfectly,even putting in the baffle ,installing the reinforcing ring around the sender opening then rolling and soldering the seams so there woud be no rust from welding! Cost about $350.00. You can't tell it from the original as he used all the old fittings.

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  • 1 year later...
So "dodge36MA", how is the restoration going? It has been a long time and I was wondering how your late summer driving went in 2012.

I was also curions about what you selected to work on so far in 2013.

Keep us informed - with photos!

things are going good Ive just got back to work on the thing I was side tracked with building my home but im in and have set up shop in the garage here is a link to flicker with the update http://www.flickr.com/photos/57892007@N00/sets/72157637287522483/

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Welcome to the world of the 1936 Dodge Paul, yours looks like a real nice car. I have a rumble seat cp and I have most of the options that were offered. Mine, however, is in a million or more pieces right now as I try to move on with a very slow restoratin lol. If I can be of any help, it will be my pleasure. I have received a LOT of help from this group and you will find a great bunch of guys here to help you. Good luck and have fun.

Bob

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  • 4 months later...

Hey Paul! Been pretty curious as to how "dodge36MA" has been doing on the '36 Dodge D2 restoration.

I know it has been a pretty crappy winter but do you have any recent photos? Keep us up to date please! :cool:

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  • 4 months later...

1936 Dodge D2 question here:

My wife's grandpa has a '36 D2 that has been sitting in his garage for 10 years. He says, and my father in law confirmed, it ran well when they parked it, but the carburetor was acting up so they took it off and gave it to a mechanic friend to rebuild. 10 years later there is a rebuilt carb sitting in the back seat. It's a Ball & Ball C 0-370 5. Is the the correct carb (or at least compatible)? If this is not an original series carb, 1. what/when is the carb from, and 2. what was the original carburetor?

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I didn't think to take a picture of the entire carburetor.

Considering the car has been sitting for 10 years, what would we need to do to get it in drivable condition?

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1936 Dodge D2 question here:

My wife's grandpa has a '36 D2 that has been sitting in his garage for 10 years. He says, and my father in law confirmed, it ran well when they parked it, but the carburetor was acting up so they took it off and gave it to a mechanic friend to rebuild. 10 years later there is a rebuilt carb sitting in the back seat. It's a Ball & Ball C 0-370 5. Is the the correct carb (or at least compatible)? If this is not an original series carb, 1. what/when is the carb from, and 2. what was the original carburetor?

I didn't think to take

Considering the car has been sitting for 10 years, what would we need to do to get it in drivable condition?

I say save yourself time and grief and call the people at Kanter auto parts , they will sell you a rebuilt carb that fits your 1936 dodge. They do not rebuild them until it's ordered so they don't sit on the shelf and dry out .. I got mine their and it's been great just bolted it on and runs like a champ

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I think you need to make sure that the gas tank is emptied. Any old gas eliminated. Get the carburator on, replace battery (under front seat). I use at least 89 octane gas. Check the radiator, drain several times and fill with coolant. Change the oil and check the air intake filter. If it is stock the brakes and shocks are hydraulic. You may need a professional to check them. Try starting it. If it starts be careful if you drive it. The brakes may need to be pumped a few times. Check all the guages to see if they work. Good luck! I'm cruising tomorrow in my 36 beauty winner!

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Thanks for the list! Seems like a reasonable place to start. I'll add some car pics or start a new thread when we get to work. Currently garage is full of stuff making pictures difficult.

Would the fuel pump need to be rebuilt? I haven't looked at it yet, but would guess if there is any old gas in it then it could present problems?

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I don't think it will need to be rebuilt, however old gas can turn to varnish. I would try to empty all gas lines and replace the gas filter. By the way, my carburator is a stromberg ex, exv . we were out cruising last night. The comments were awesome. I' ll see if I can up load some pics of my 36.

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Old OLD gas will leave varnish and lots of other "sandy" deposits.

Bear in mind the new gas will clean up those old deposits and will cause problems for a while so be sure to use a filter or sediment bolt ahead of the carburetor.

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Cahartley, how would I incorporate a filter or sediment bolt into the system before the carburetor?

Today I got the hood off of the car, and found that the exhaust manifold had also been removed. The bottom portion was still attached, but not bolted on. The top half was sitting inside the car as well. I got the manifold cleaned up and have it on the car, just need to put on/tighten the nuts that hold it on. Also drained coolant out of the engine. post-102605-143142690329_thumb.jpg

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I see the sediment bowl from the fuel pump is sitting on the head in your photo. Once replaced that should catch the particulate sediment from the gas tank if the screen above it is in good condition. This is the correct AC Fuel Pump.

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The correct carburetor for your '36 Dodge is a Stromberg EXV-2. The Carter B&B that you seem to have there is a common replacement carb that seemed to be used on the D2. It is from Dodge trucks and was also used originally on Plymouth of the era.

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I also saw in your photo that the intake and exhaust manifold are not coming up evenly to the engine block. You mentioned that the two parts were separated at one time. If that's the case you MUST loosen the two halves when you tighten the manifolds to the block. If you don't you will crack the manifolds as you tighten them down or stress them so that sometime in the future they will crack.

If the manifolds did not come together (one is a replacement), you will have to tighten the two halves together and then have the block mating surfaces machined flat - together. Also, do not machine the surfaces between the two manifolds unless very poorly mating. If too much material is taken from the square surfaces between the manifolds, they will not line up with the mounting studs on the block later.

Take it from one who knows! :(

Time to start a new thread here instead of hijacking the original. Sorry "dodge36MA".

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The exhaust manifold it mounted with brass washers with conical holes which accept a nut with a conical ball end. Make sure you use these fasteners as they are for expansion. If you don't have the correct washers someone on this forum might have some . I made new nuts from simply drilling stainless cap nuts completely through.

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