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Considering a Reatta...Brakes


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Ive been hearing some negative things about the ABS on these cars. Are they, really that bad? Will they fail with no warning? Require constant maintenance? Be expensive to fix? Im mostly concerned with the safety aspect. Are parts still readily available? Brakes are some i really dont want to have to worry about. Thanks.

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Ive been hearing some negative things about the ABS on these cars. Are they, really that bad? Will they fail with no warning? Require constant maintenance? Be expensive to fix? Im mostly concerned with the safety aspect. Are parts still readily available? Brakes are some i really dont want to have to worry about. Thanks.

They're really not that bad. They will give warning signs before you have a failure.

Failure can be avoided by maintenance. They do have to be maintained more perhaps than normal brakes, but they don't fail just out of the blue.

Parts are still available. Anything you need for the brake system is available through the "Reatta Store" on ReattaOwner.com

Some people here seem to think that this brake system is too complex, and too expensive to fix, but it's really not bad. Chances are any Reatta you buy will need an "Accumulator" (black ball on top of the master cylinder). You may need a Pressure switch. But that does t happen as often as the accumulator.

Worse case scenario, you'll probably spend maybe $400 fixing everything. That's a high estimate.

If you like the car, don't let people's opinions of how bad the brake system scare you away.

If you do buy the car, just be sure to run the "Brake Test" on Reatta.net

I would do that before you drive the car much at all. Just to get a good idea of the condition your system is in.

Good luck! And welcome to the forum!

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Thanks for the info.

They're really not that bad. They will give warning signs before you have a failure.

Failure can be avoided by maintenance. They do have to be maintained more perhaps than normal brakes, but they don't fail just out of the blue.

Parts are still available. Anything you need for the brake system is available through the "Reatta Store" on ReattaOwner.com

Some people here seem to think that this brake system is too complex, and too expensive to fix, but it's really not bad. Chances are any Reatta you buy will need an "Accumulator" (black ball on top of the master cylinder). You may need a Pressure switch. But that does t happen as often as the accumulator.

Worse case scenario, you'll probably spend maybe $400 fixing everything. That's a high estimate.

If you like the car, don't let people's opinions of how bad the brake system scare you away.

If you do buy the car, just be sure to run the "Brake Test" on Reatta.net

I would do that before you drive the car much at all. Just to get a good idea of the condition your system is in.

Good luck! And welcome to the forum!

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I'd add here that the 1991 cars have a different (Bosch) ABS system that is as reliable as any current production ABS setup. The 1988-90 cars had a system sourced from Teves, and while it is more complex than most newer systems, it is not that bad. Parts are a bit more expensive perhaps, but the two biggest problems are:

1) Lack of knowledge on how the system works and how it needs to be maintained. This causes many people to bad mouth it because they are either uniformed about it, or have been sold a line of misinformation by their mechanic.

2) Lack of prior maintenance. Some Reatta buyers appear to have been burned by getting a car that the ABS was neglected on. Then, they have to spend the money and effort right out of the gate to get it right again. This results in some irritation (naturally) and some posts here have reflected that.

I have an 88 I bought with 36,500 miles on it, has 41,500 now. I have done nothing to the ABS so far (in 1.5 years of ownership) except a thorough inspection of all brake components, and changing the brake fluid out so that it is fresh. My car's brakes work great, and I have no concern about their safety.

KDirk

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As a former Reatta owner, the brakes were never a major issue for me. The one thing to keep in mind is that mechanics that don't know the system tend to throw parts at it In later Reatta ownership, I found an old stand alone Buick dealer who knew the cars, but more importantly read every thread from here relating to my car.

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Tom raises a good point here regarding shops/mechanics. Most really experienced techs at the time these cars were new or just a few years old are now mostly retired (or running the shop, not working in a bay anymore) I'd guess. What we have now are a lot of younger techs who were trained and have become more experienced on more modern ABS implementations that bear little or no resemblance to Teves.

Since it is a fairly seldom seen setup anymore (due to retirement of many, if not most cars that were so equipped) and is rather unusual it throws these guys for a loop. Then there is the inevitable lowering of standards that has occurred in most trades over 2-3 decades, auto mechanics included. This results in a lot of guys who can turn a wrench but lack troubleshooting skills. So, the first thing they do is throw new or rebuilt parts at it, this also under the assumption that the age of the car means parts must be worn out.

A good mechanic who really knows how to troubleshoot is a very valuable find indeed.

KDirk

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"A good mechanic who really knows how to troubleshoot" is working in computers now. Air conditioned, clean, & no heavy lifting.

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