Jump to content

A nod to Colonel Jimmy Doolittle and his crew


West Peterson

Recommended Posts

Wow!! Today is the 70th anniversary of the Raid on Tokyo by Colonel Jimmy Doolittle and 15 other B-25 crews. They did a "fly over" at the Air Force Museum this afternoon, roughly 15 B-25s or so... maybe even a Mustang escort or two. Evidently my home is in line with their flight path. For a moment I thought a freight train was going through my front yard, then realized what was happening and ran out my front door to soak in the moment.

Edited by West Peterson (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow!! Today is the 70th anniversary of the Raid on Tokyo by General Billy Mitchell and 15 other B-25 crews. They did a "fly over" at the Air Force Museum this afternoon, roughly 15 B-25s or so... maybe even a Mustang escort or two. Evidently my home is in line with their flight path. For a moment I thought a freight train was going through my front yard, then realized what was happening and ran out my front door to soak in the moment.

West - Check your history books young man. The Tokyo Raid was led by Col. Jimmy Doolittle.

I do like your salute to the brave men that participated in this raid and all the other WWII vets as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as it was not Dr. Doolittle.

What Jimmy did was nothing short of inspirational. Then again, the entire mission was to be inspirational for the folks in the US. It was to be daunting to the folks in Japan. Effectively Jimmy accomplished both. Jimmy's book, "I could never be so lucky again" is a great read. I recommend it. Jimmy has always been a inspiration to me! He has done much in the aviation industry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest South_paw

Very cool :cool:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/9Bqbx8C4Y-E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doolittle's Raid Survivors' 70th Reunion in Ohio.

The jovial banter and storytelling will halt, and guests will be ushered out of the meeting room, the door shutting behind them.

Five men, all in their 90s, will come to military-erect attention. Before them will be a wooden display case with 80 silver goblets. On each, a name is engraved twice: to be read right-side-up — for those still alive — or to be read placed upside-down, in memory of the 75 now dead.

"To those who have gone," 96-year-old Lt. Col. Richard Cole will toast, raising his goblet high.

The other four surviving Doolittle's Raiders — Maj. Thomas Griffin, Lt. Col. Robert Hite, Lt. Col. Edward Saylor and Master Sgt. David Thatcher — will answer in unison: "To those who have gone."

The ceremony Wednesday will come 70 years to the day after the bombing raid over Tokyo led by Lt. Col. "Jimmy" Doolittle that helped change the course of World War II. Four days of celebration are planned April 17-20 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near Dayton, including a fly-in of B-25 bombers like they flew. Special guests include survivors or relatives of the USS Hornet aircraft carrier crew that launched them and of Chinese villagers who helped save them after the raid.

The toast ritual grew from early get-togethers led by Doolittle, who died in 1993.

"It's going to be special," said Griffin. "I can't help but think it's going to be our last big one."

Six years ago, there were still 16 survivors.

By plan, the last two Raiders living will someday make the final toast. They will sip from cognac vintage 1896 — the year Doolittle was born.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jimmy Doolittle may have been the best pilot who ever lived. He is the man who was able to win the national air races in the GeeBee, an aircraft that killed everyone else who ever flew it. He also flew racing seaplanes in the Schneider Cup races and was the first air force pilot to ever do an outside loop.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...We owe the WWII generation so much, thank you to all who served and those that are on duty today...

I definitely ditto everyone's comments. Bob's comment above made me think of a man named Hal who I had the pleasure of speaking with for a while this past Saturday, April 14th, at an old car gathering in Westbrook, CT. I had casually known this fellow for many years thru seeing him at various car events, etc., and on Saturday he was wearing a hat that indicated his Vietnam Veteran status. Then it clicked--I also remembered the sticker on the back window of his '66 GTO that he drove to the event that day: "University of South Vietnam" (see attachment).

After a little bit more digging, I came upon this article, published in January of this year, saluting Hal Farrington as a new member of the CT Veterans Hall of Fame, reference:

http://www.shorelinewebnews.com/oldsaybrooknow/2012/01/rep-giuliano-honors-one-of-old-saybrooks-finest/

Thank you Hal, and all Veterans.

post-34222-143138932987_thumb.jpg

Edited by stock_steve (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the clip. It's always impressive to see old WWII aircraft in action. I was fortunate enough to watch a couple of WWII trainers make circles over our neighborhood yesterday at a really low altitude. It's nice to hear the old engines humming along and a real treat for the kids 2 and 4.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...