Jump to content

AARP Magazine antique car article


trimacar

Recommended Posts

I'm of a certain age where, yes, I receive AARP magazine.

Fairly good article in the April/May issue on collecting antique cars, and the author has some insights I didn't expect to read in such an article. Of course there'll be some who disagree with the comments, but I, for one, think they're spot on.

Below from article, guess it's OK to repeat if I give credit:

"Collectible cars, especially American ones, that postdate 1973 are so are rare. That's when environmental and safety restrictions killed off the last golden-age muscle cars, and when American automaking in particular entered an aesthetically challenged period that few enthusiasts wish to revisit"

and

"A lot of market experts predict...that the collectible era of automobiles has essentially ended.......Few anticipate that aging Gen Xers, gripped with nostalgia, will rescue their high school Corollas from junkyards a decade hence."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess it's the "market experts" that could be proven wrong. Afterall, how many Baby Boomers actually drove real muscle cars to school, vs how many "wished" they drove muscle cars to school? I doubt many Gen X'ers will be coveting Corollas. I suspect that the Gen X'ers who are actually driving Corollas are coveting other things in the parking lot... or show room, and those are the cars that will be on their "wish list," when it's time to think nostalgically.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I look for the sports or sporty cars being built now to be collectibles. That would include the Corvettes and Mustangs and the new Challengers and Camaros. I also expect the high-dollar cars to be collectibles and that this would include about any European sport car and some the convertibles and sedans from people such as Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Jaguar etc. I don't envision Volvos and Saabs and Nissans and Toyotas and such as gaining collectible status but in 20 years who knows how people will think. My regret is that when I was buying new full-size convertibles such as Fords and Cadillacs and Chryslers that I never once owned a hot Buick GS or a GTO or anything of that type. However I did attempt to order a '65 GTO and the dealer and I couldn't reach common ground on what it would cost me. I also considered a Mustang convertible and a Corvette but neither had a trunk large enough to accomodate a person that liked to jump into a car and travel at the drop of a hat. I also tried to order a '65 Sport Sattelite convertible with the 335 horse 383 V-8 with a 4-speed and the dealer tried to talk me down to a 2-door hardtop with a 2-barrel 318. I think he didn't know how to process an order and just tried to sell whatever the manufacturer shipped to him. Oh, I did order a '65 Malibu SS convertible with a 300/327 and 4-speed but GM went on strike and never delivered it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see a golden opportunity for a magazine editor or inspired writer here - obviously AARP needs someone to serve as their "automotive expert." There are so many people who are in the hobby and get their magazine I think they should make a big effort to get some good stuff (and the right stuff) into their literature. They should be embracing the fast approaching antique mini-van craze! I'll be glad to take those old brass cars off their hands while they enjoy their air conditioned comfort!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I owned several muscle cars over the years but not placing any value on them, I just drove them for a couple years and traded them in! Who would have thought that they would ever be collectable? I had a 65 442 convertible, a 66 Mustang, a 68 Torino, a 70 Super Bee, and a 73 Charger! If I only had them today! I don't think I ever got more than $1,500 on a trade in for any of them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, since I am not quite there yet in terms of my AARP magazine (:D - you retired guys of course get the last laugh!!!) tell me, does the article feature prewar stuff at all? Curious if the writer is writing to his own "Boomer) generation - I think I am like the last year or so of that...

While I agree with the general sentiment that the pickin's are slimmer post - say, 72 or so, each era will have it's collectible cars. I am shocked at the price of say, a late 70s TA or Z-28 on one hand, but on the other, since acquiring the MB, we are seeing quite a following in 80s European cars. I am looking for a set of BBS rims for this car, common circa '85 - '92 or so, right? Well the MB guys refer to them as "period correct" and a nice set will easily set me back a grand before the sneakers to go with. Someone is buying them - so that says there is interest. My point is the future is tough to forecast sometimes when we all kind of color what may be desirable with our own filters.

Some, but not all cars, cross generations, so the question to me is less what will be collected but what will remain interesting to younger people in time. Many Gen X types appreciate musclecars but those behind them walk right by them. Funny how time changes everything including what's the "hot car to have". Well, I am anxiously awaiting the much talked about decline in prices of a Classic Packard, traditional '32 highboy or MG T series to replace our Packard. And waiting.... And waiting...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to speak as a Generation "X er" . I have never owned a Japanese car and never would. And as far as what type of car a "Xer" would like, Just look at my list of cars below. Ed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...