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1929 Stutz M straight 8


xk140dhc
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Most Stutz parts are not drop in, but are made for each application. Are you replacing the factory rods? They have a very high failure rate and make big holes in the blocks. Bearings for the crank are babbit and must be done by someone who knows their stuff. Valves use adjustible buckets which thread on the valves, I have seen lots of poorly done valves. Just the head has 20 freeze plugs in it. Timing chain upgrades should also be done. I would recommend you get in touch with someone who knows what they are doing. The photos below also have a custom ground cam. Check out AJ's thread for more information. I can give you a phone number of a shop if you like. Ed

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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HI xk140 I have ss valves with .003 oversize stem had 250 made for sv and 250 for dv .also make zenith 105dc carb casting machained to put float, jets etc. gas cap, horn button and all the other parts below, parking, tail, marker. jewels, lens. The two large gear at the bottom steering column. Had BRC in fl make piston 7.5 comp. iam doing a 1930 m engine with packard rods Thanks John

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Hello Ed,

I have read that thread. At the moment I´m repairing a Stutz straight 8 engine OHC (built 1929). I would need 8 steel conrods and also the timing chain for replacement. Please can you give me an address or phone number, where I will get the parts? Can you also organize other parts e.g. intake manifold, alternator, starter.....? Hearing soon from you - Best Regards from Austria, Europe. Peter

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  • 4 months later...

The number is 413-543-9017 east coast business hours. Ask for John. The engines are not too complicated, but parts are almost always made to order. Don't run junk pistons....... most available are poor quality. I would use Aries or Ross and NO others. There is lots of good builders out there, but the good ones are busy and more expensive than the local engine shops. They are worth what they charge. I am doing over another motor right now done by a so called expert. He was expert at poor workmanship and causing lots of problems. Take your time and it will come out fine.

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M series Duralumin rods are probably the most risky to run, because the change to steel caps means that the tightening of the conrod bolts crush the material of the rod beyond its elastic limit. With CNC machined rods, from 4140 steel or similar, it is smart to use Bedford truck or International truck bearing shells. With copper-lead bearings it is also smart to get the crankshaft journals nitride; which is not a great expense, and it will last forever. We have made our own pistons for 3 1/4"bore from corebox and pattern I had made over 30 years ago. You have to used a suitable casting alloy, and heat-treat the castings. You can buy the carbide tipped grooving tools for the rings. You make a toolpost block to mount these upside down with the cutting edges on centre right of your lathe. Then when you machine them in a single operation with soluble oil and water to cool and lubricate, the swarf falls clear and does not jam. Years ago I made probably a dozen or so for other people until I had to stop because I was left with only a single float as a sample. One of my Stutz friends here has connections with a good metal spinner, and we will have perfect replica floats any time. The floats were the only original parts that I re-used, though making all the other small parts is a lot of "knife & fork" work. As old Doug Wilson , who did a lot of carby repairs for antique cars used to say, "There are two types of carburettor trouble; dirt trouble, and spanner trouble. Only item I had to correct was the accelerator pump plungers. I made the fit too good, and when you closed the throttle, the upper disc would dump raw fuel out the top of the acc. pump well. A set of drill holes round the top disc fixed that. Our patterns produced bronze sand castings which needed a lot of finishing. In future we shall be able to do much nicer investment casting.

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You can replace existing rods with 1940-46 or 1947 Model 356 Packard steel connecting rods For memory Packard are 1/8" smaller however if you use run bearings as opposed to shells you don't need to grind crank rod throws to suit If you DON'T intend to race or supercharge the motor run bearings are OK

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I have done one l and two m The l with 356 packard with insert ground shaft down .125 and stroked it .100 . See car on stutz blackhawk l6 One m packard rods bored out to .010 to bolt holes and had them babbited to the standard shaft . I have new valves .Had piston made .250 above the block gives 7.5 comp. I only do my motors.

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  • 8 months later...

Hi. I saw your post that you had custom valves made for your engine. I'm looking for a reputable valve maker. Were you happy with your vendor's work? Can I have his contact information. I am working on a Continental Straight 8. Thanks! JW

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi, sorry for the late response. We made the valves ourself. The basic valves are from a mercedes-benz truck, the diameter of the shaft is 10mm and you can have the valve disk diameter what you need. You have to prepare the diameter of the valve guide to 10mm. If you need further Information, please contact me.

Regards,

Peter from Austria

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