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I saw a discussion somewhere about how to repair the threads on the attachment end of those horn trumpets if they get stripped out. Having trouble remembering where I saw it though. Let me know if I need to dig more.

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One thing which I am sure someone will be able to inform me about is : what is the hole in the passenger door capping, above the winder, for?

Sorry, I don't know much about these cars but I sure would like to!

Ray.

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Hey Guys,

Ply33, Im not sure if those parker lights mounted on the guards are original or not, I've ony had her going on 3 weeks so have alot to research and learn about.

Those parker lamps on the guards are disconnected anyway, I was tinkering today and found that out. The headlights that are on her have parker bulbs in them, so if I can get some orange bulbs they should work. My friend was busy with his daughter's birthday party today so am still to sit down and work out which path to take for the tail lights/indicators.

1930, those little deals are definatly horns with a gauze sreen on them. My model is a DRXX if thats any help, not sure what that stands for as I'm still waiting on the Historical Services to get back to me, they must be busy as I sent them an email last Wednesday and havn't had a reply as of yet.

Ray, I'm not sure what the hole in the door capping is for (your talking about my car?), its on both the drivers and the passengers door, can only think that its for another model?? I'd like to know as well.

Luke.

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Some people might be bothered by this, I hope you are not one of them, your car is one of the nicest newly restored car that has been shown on this forum in a long time so with that said the lower-priced model created to meet the needs of the Depression era market was the DRXX "Standard Six;" it was offered with a painted radiator shell, no safety glass and no pinstriping.

Surprisingly ( I still need to verify this so dont take it as end all be all ) the DRXX was only 20 dollars cheaper than the Deluxe DR model so sales werent that great with it.

Here is some addit info I found about your car, should get us started..........it would all need to be verified since it is info I found doing an on-line search but its prob pretty close if not spot on.

ENGINE

A new engine debuted for Dodge's passenger cars in 1934. Chrysler engineers bored out the old 201.3-cu.in., 75hp straight-six to produce the new L-head 217.8-cu.in. version with a 3.25-inch bore and 4.375-inch stroke. The standard engine fitted to the DRXX and DR models had a 5.6:1 compression ratio and counter-balanced crankshaft; it produced 82hp at 3,600 rpm. The standard engine for the more expensive DS models had a higher 6.5:1 compression ratio that produced 87hp; this engine was also available as an option on the DR models. All blocks and cylinder heads were cast iron and the carburetor was a Stromberg EX-22 one-barrel downdraft type.

The engines used a water-baffle tube installed in the water jacket behind the centrifugal water pump. Engineers designed this to cool the exhaust valves. Over time, this piece rotted away due to corrosion, and is not visible to the naked eye. This piece must be replaced if the engine is to be properly cooled."

Unlike other engines of the period, the Dodge Brothers engines had decent oiling with the aid of a Purolator oil filter. The carburetors were fitted with a large, Duplex oiled, copper-gauze air cleaner.

TRANSMISSION

The floor-shifted transmission was a manual three-speed with helical selective sliding gears and a single-plate dry clutch. Selective cam-and-roller free-wheeling could be ordered as an option. The universal joints were well-made ball and trunnion units with roller bearings, and were protected by a leather boot at both ends of the driveshaft.

In the differential, spiral-bevel gears were used, in either 4.11:1 or 4.375:1 ratios

SUSPENSION

The 1934 models saw the debut of an independent front suspension. The front and rear leaf springs were of the semi-elliptical type, with the rear springs protected with metal covers. The spring shackles were "C"-shaped bolts held with rubber-cored bushings to reduce vibration. The threaded bushings served the dual purpose of holding the shackle in place and isolating it from the frame in the hanger.

Hydraulic shock absorbers were used; those in front were double-acting, while single-acting shock absorbers were mounted in back. The worm-and-roller steering was semi-irreversible, with a ratio of 18.2:1. Most Dodge Brothers cars of 1934 had a 40-foot turning circle and 3 1/2 turns lock-to-lock. The steering column also could be lowered and raised, similar to today's tilt wheels

BRAKES

The four-wheel drum system was hydraulic; it originally used a strong, molded-asbestos riveted brake lining. Larger than in previous years, the drums measured 10 inches in diameter and had a total braking area of 126.25 square inches. It's a simple system that should give long-lasting service with minimum upkeep

INTERIOR

The standard interior for the DR and DRXX models boasted cloth seats; leather and mohair were available options. The convertible coupes came with standard leather interior, or mohair at no extra charge. The DS models sported mohair in closed cars, with leather for the convertible sedan. Optional for the interior were a heater, clock, radio and cigar lighter. Seat covers were optional.

BODY/FRAME

The Dodge utilized full-frame construction, with a double-drop bridge type and a seven-inch deep channel. The body was all steel. Interestingly, both front and rear bumpers were optional, as were metal sidemount covers, wire spoke wheels, bumper guards, a spotlamp and a chrome radiator shell. Other options included exterior rearview mirrors, metal spare tire cover, body pinstriping and special paint.

The frames had wood runners along the rails and these areas are quite susceptible to corrosion. The floors, however, were made of very thick steel and many have survived quite well.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Yes I just verified the price and as per factory literature the deluxe Dodge six 4 dr. sedan sold for 765 dollars basic model out the door ( 2940 loaded ) ............( with A/C, power brakes, power steering, heated seats and mirrors, and automatic trans ;)) and the standard Dodge six sold for 745 dollars or 2910 fully loaded with options which we still need to pinpoint.

BTW, you will have to give Chrysler Historical time, will have to learn not to be in a rush for any of this old car stuff, it will be weeks maybe before they get back with you.

Quote.......1930, those little deals are definatly horns with a gauze sreen on them.........thanks for that than, now I know

Quote........Ply33, Im not sure if those parker lights mounted on the guards are original or not, I've ony had her going on 3 weeks so have alot to research and learn about.............I wouldnt care myself either way, leave em on the car I say.

Dont try to tell anyone they are factory installed because I can tell you now they are not but maybe with a little investigation we can show that they are period correct for the vehicle and could maybe have been added by the dealer that sold the car originally in which case in my opinion that would make them original for the car.......just not factory equipment if you get my drift.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Quote........Engine: All blocks and cylinder heads were cast iron ...........I know this too be false, first year for an aluminum cylinder head but not in all models, will need to look into which one as I dont have it memorized yet.

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Quote.......Selective cam-and-roller free-wheeling could be ordered as an option. .........Pretty sure this is not quite accurate as well, I believe I have read that it was standard on some models, would have to look into further.

BTW anyone know what automatic clutch is? It might not be what you think. Only avail on Deluxe models as a clue!! Take a guess

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One thing which I am sure someone will be able to inform me about is : what is the hole in the passenger door capping, above the winder, for?

Sorry, I don't know much about these cars but I sure would like to!

Ray.

This is for the vent window winder.

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Quote.........The 1934 models saw the debut of an independent front suspension. The front and rear leaf springs were of the semi-elliptical type, with the rear springs protected with metal covers. The spring shackles were "C"-shaped bolts held with rubber-cored bushings to reduce vibration. The threaded bushings served the dual purpose of holding the shackle in place and isolating it from the frame in the hanger. ...........I know all of this to be true and can really go into much greater detail on this if needed.

Notice it does mention the rear covers ( cadaber ) as being factory installed.

We can verify all the rest of the info above easy enough, just not in one sitting I guess.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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This is for the vent window winder.

One other thing that I could add is that there was an optional 7 point ventilating system avail on these cars, you could prob. see pretty quickly how you could start out at 745 and finish at 2910 pretty quickly !

Might be someone replaced the door panels at one point from a car that had the window winder or maybe you are just missing some pieces to that, we can find out easy enough

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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There is a chromed frame that goes inside the door window opening.

Inside the chromed fame is a window and another chromed frame surrounding a vent window .

You can wind the entire assembly including the vent window down and up or you can move a lever that locks the entire assembly in the up postion and then lower just the glass window pane leaving the vent window up.The vent window can then then be cranked out using the winder mentioned in previous post via a gear that has become engaged in tne process.

It must have been expensive to make !

These are also in 1934 Plymouth De luxe and Chrysler CA.

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That sounds like a really up market feature, so I can see why you guys thought it might be that the door cappings were from another car.

The design sounds like the British built Chrysler Wimbledon. From what my Dad could remember, they were full of innovative features, not seen on many British cars until after the War.

ray.

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Quote.

BTW anyone know what automatic clutch is? It might not be what you think. Only avail on Deluxe models as a clue!! Take a guess

Now your'e talking! My Dad designed and built a prototype centrifugal (automatic )clutch which could be retro fitted to manual cars. This was as a response to the many injured servicemen after the War when automatic gearboxes were only available in this country, on upper market cars at that time. Nothing came of it.

The only other thing which springs to mind, is the Wilson pre - selector gearbox with fluid flywheel - a semi automatic, I suppose. To change gear, you pre selected the gear required with a little lever and then when you wanted to make the change, you depressed the gear change pedal. A delight to use, once you get used to it!

Ray.

Edited by R.White (see edit history)
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Quote........The only other thing which springs to mind, is the Wilson pre - selector gearbox with fluid flywheel - a semi automatic, I suppose. To change gear, you pre selected the gear required with a little lever and then when you wanted to make the change, you depressed the gear change pedal. A delight to use, once you get used to it!

Not Quite Ray, I would like to know more though about the ........Dr.Fogarty invented the centrifugal clutch in 1934...........might be you have your dates off, I can find that he was born in 34. I can find little else concerning his centrifugal clutch work other than he wanted a better scooter.

This automatic clutch was not new to the 34 Dodge but had been offered as either standard or optonal equipment on the 32 and 33 Dodge as well ( and I am sure a host of other products )

Lets give it a couple of days and see if anyone has it in their own car.

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I have probably got it wong. I remember Dad talking about Dr Fogarty and the centrifugal clutch so I have got it mixed up somewhere along the way; after all it was all a very long time ago.

The clutch my Dad made worked O.K. most of the time but would slip on a long steep climb - so it had it's limitations but in reality, the automatic gearbox would have made it redundant anyway.

What I didn't realise was that there was an automatic clutch already in use in American cars before the war. Please tell us more. Did they manage to overcome the slipping problem? how?

Edited by R.White
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I have probably got it wong. I remember Dad talking about Dr Fogarty and the centrifugal clutch so I have got it mixed up somewhere along the way; after all it was all a very long time ago.

The clutch my Dad made worked O.K. most of the time but would slip on a long steep climb - so it had it's limitations but in reality, the automatic gearbox would have made it redundant anyway.

What I didn't realise was that there was an automatic clutch already in use in American cars before the war. Please tell us more. Did they manage to overcome the slipping problem? how?

No you had it right I believe other than the date, if you can find anything more on his invention post it here. Thanks

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This is what I have found. It's amazing what is out there! :)

This, of course is a form of manual clutch assistance, not an automatic clutch like the centrifugal one. I would love to know what method of clutch lock the Dodge used.

Ray

Edited by R.White (see edit history)
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There is a chromed frame that goes inside the door window opening.

Inside the chromed fame is a window and another chromed frame surrounding a vent window .

You can wind the entire assembly including the vent window down and up or you can move a lever that locks the entire assembly in the up postion and then lower just the glass window pane leaving the vent window up.The vent window can then then be cranked out using the winder mentioned in previous post via a gear that has become engaged in tne process.

It must have been expensive to make !

These are also in 1934 Plymouth De luxe and Chrysler CA.

You can see the operation of that on a 1934 Plymouth DeLuxe at 1934 Plymouth DeLuxe

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...This automatic clutch was not new to the 34 Dodge but had been offered as either standard or optonal equipment on the 32 and 33 Dodge as well ( and I am sure a host of other products )

Lets give it a couple of days and see if anyone has it in their own car.

It was available on the '33 and '34 Plymouths too. Looks a bit like a vacuum assist unit for power brakes and it connected by a linkage to the accelerator pedal for control and a separate bell crank on the clutch release to control the clutch. If engaged via a dash control then it releases the clutch when you remove your foot from the accelerator. The cars that have/had that also have freewheeling transmissions. Between the automatic clutch which handles the issue of shifting into first and/or reverse while stopped and the freewheeling you can drive without touching the clutch pedal.

At least that is the theory.

I've never had the automatic clutch installed on my car to test it out. Many/most were removed leading me to think that they were problematical. The one I picked up at a swap meet many, many years ago has a worn out spool valve that will, if I ever install and hook it up, be a major vacuum leak. There was no air inlet filter on the unit and given the dusty roads of the day they probably wore the control valves out in short order.

Freewheeling still works fine but given the tiny size of the drum brakes is a bit scary in hilly terrain. I usually leave it locked out except for demonstration purposes.

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post-30650-143138927252_thumb.jpg

Edited by ply33
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Brilliant, Ply33, one of the best posts I have seen on here.

I suppose today we would call it a servo operated clutch.

By the way, I am a fan of the freewheel; having had it on our Austin 3 litre Princess (Vanden Plas)and Rover 100. Explaining for those who may not have realised why you prefer not to rely on your brakes alone, it should be said that with the freewheel in use, there is an absence of engine braking.

Thankyou for all this detailed information; it's made my day.

Ray.

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I think Tod has it but the way it is explained here seems much easier to operate and seems to have less parts. Maybe they are just dummying it down here though, hopefully someone here with a Dodge that is equipped with this can let us know

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post-48869-143138927278_thumb.jpg

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This is what I have found. It's amazing what is out there! :)

This, of course is a form of manual clutch assistance, not an automatic clutch like the centrifugal one. I would love to know what method of clutch lock the Dodge used.

Ray

That is pretty amazing, dont think I will run out and buy a car with it but still amazing

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To clear up the X and XX -

XX meant a cheaper version of the model -

1934 Dodge DR DeLuxe Six (Intro January, 1934)

4 door sedan - $765

1934 Dodge DRXX Six (Intro May, 1934)

4 door sedan - $745

1933 Plymouth PC Six (Intro November, 1932)

4 door sedan - $545

1933 Plymouth PCXX Standard Six (Intro April, 1933)

4 door sedan - $510

A single X (PCX, DRX) meant a car built for export with a 2.88 inch bore.

The PC used an engine 3.13 inch bore and 4.13 inch stroke for 189.8-cid.

A 2.88 in bore gave 161.3-cid. The small bore was popular in countries that had a tax on engine bore size and number of cylinders, although they called it `horsepower`.

The PC engine was 23.44 horsepower while the PCX was 19.34.

The 1933 Dodge DP used a 3.13 inch bore with a 4.38 inch stroke, but that was still 23.44 horsepower. Needless to say, the horspower tax encouraged long stroke engines.

Bill

Toronto, ON

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To clear up the X and XX -

XX meant a cheaper version of the model -

1934 Dodge DR DeLuxe Six (Intro January, 1934)

4 door sedan - $765

1934 Dodge DRXX Six (Intro May, 1934)

4 door sedan - $745

1933 Plymouth PC Six (Intro November, 1932)

4 door sedan - $545

1933 Plymouth PCXX Standard Six (Intro April, 1933)

4 door sedan - $510

A single X (PCX, DRX) meant a car built for export with a 2.88 inch bore.

The PC used an engine 3.13 inch bore and 4.13 inch stroke for 189.8-cid.

A 2.88 in bore gave 161.3-cid. The small bore was popular in countries that had a tax on engine bore size and number of cylinders, although they called it `horsepower`.

The PC engine was 23.44 horsepower while the PCX was 19.34.

The 1933 Dodge DP used a 3.13 inch bore with a 4.38 inch stroke, but that was still 23.44 horsepower. Needless to say, the horspower tax encouraged long stroke engines.

Bill

Toronto, ON

Thanks Bill, I think the X in many cases on earlier models was to signify export models, I would need to verify that though, just something that is stuck in my mind

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Thanks Bill, I think the X in many cases on earlier models was to signify export models, I would need to verify that though, just something that is stuck in my mind

Don't know about Dodge, but he has it right for Plymouth: A single X suffix was for export. But the only Plymouth with a XX suffix, the 1933 PCXX, was for a later economy version of the PC. For Plymouth that XX aberration was for one year only. In '34 the equivalent later economy version, the PG, used a normal for the era two letter engineering code.

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That is really very useful info, Bill.

You are absolutely right about the dreaded horsepower tax and long stroke engines. The result in Britain was a proliferation of small sixes and some truly awefull 4 cylinder engines with very fast piston speeds which I have read wore out in no time. The American cars must have been much better.

As a matter of personal interest, do you know anything about the cars that were made at Kew, like the Kew Standard 6 and the Chrysler Wimbledon, of which just two remain?

Ray

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That is really very useful info, Bill.

You are absolutely right about the dreaded horsepower tax and long stroke engines. The result in Britain was a proliferation of small sixes and some truly awefull 4 cylinder engines with very fast piston speeds which I have read wore out in no time. The American cars must have been much better.

As a matter of personal interest, do you know anything about the cars that were made at Kew, like the Kew Standard 6 and the Chrysler Wimbledon, of which just two remain?

Ray

At least in 1933, the Chrysler Kew Six was a Plymouth PCX with the small export engine. They were shipped to England "completely knocked down" and assembled with locally sourced interior.

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Bill,

Interesting information on the Dodges.

No sure if you've been reading some of my posts but mine was made a right hand drive in America and sent to Australia. I don't have an X in any of the numbers I have and incidently, my build sheet on the microfilm was gone missing along with 200 odd others. The plot thickens !!!!

Ian

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Hey Guys,

Wow 1930, thats alot of info you have posted, thanks alot, and no, im not bothered at all that Dot was a cheaper model, my wife and I have her know and couldn't be happier with her. Im trying to track down the person who restored her through the people I bought her off in Texas so will let you know what I come up with.

Chrycoman, Thanks for your post also, it clears it up.

Luke.

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Stephen48 is spot on.

These windows were split. You could wind down the main window or by moving a lever locked both the 1/4 vent window and the main window together thus enabling both to be wound down at the same time.

I have attached a photo so you can see the winder ( sorry its not as clear as I hoped ) and the black car clearly shows the 2 windows in the front right side.

Mine has the split windows. If Luke can provide a photo with the windows up this should show me and I believe his will be one complete single window. Again if the XX is a cheaper car then they would have removed the split window feature, fitted a single window and use the same garnish mould hence the hole with nothing in it.

post-44589-143138927765_thumb.jpg

post-44589-143138927768_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Luke,

This all goes into understanding the different makes and models and having you confirm this just ticks another box !!

Luke, could you please take photos outside and under the car where the front and rear bumper irons attach to the body / chassis, I'm still trying to get a handle on this setup ! Just when you get time would be great.

Thanks heaps...

Ian

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Hey Guys,

I'm having trouble up loading photos onto the forum! Keeps saying upload failed, any suggestions????

Luke.

Make em a little smaller until you get to a size that loads and stick with that

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Thanks Luke,

This all goes into understanding the different makes and models and having you confirm this just ticks another box !!

Mine has the split windows. If Luke can provide a photo with the windows up this should show me and I believe his will be one complete single window. Again if the XX is a cheaper car then they would have removed the split window feature, fitted a single window and use the same garnish mould hence the hole with nothing in it.

Ian I have literature that implies or states that the 7 way ventialtion system ( which includes these door window configurations I am assuming ) were options avail to all models. Again if you read my earlier post you will see the differences in price on where the car could be purchased and where the price could be when all the bells and whistles were attached.

Do any of you guys have the fold out windshield that is working?

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Aussie Luke:

Here is a quick rendition of how to easily post good photos on this Forum:

- Some instructions for putting "Thumbnail" style photo attachments on your posts. It is really pretty easy! You just have to be in the "Advanced" posting mode to be able to see the right icons. And you have to have the photos previously saved in a correct size (more on that later) on your computer in a place that makes sense to you so you can find any particular shot later.

1) Click on either the "New Reply" button to the left or the "Go Advanced" button below. (If this is a new thread you are starting, be sure to give it a "Title:" that identifies the subject of your thread and the year of your car.)

2) On the top row of your reply "Message:" box you will see a paper clip icon. Click on it or on the “Attach Files - Manage Attachments" button down in the Additional Options section below.

3) The "Manage Attachments" window will appear.

4) Click on the "Browse" button for that window.

5) A browse dialog will appear. Browse to the location of the file on your computer.

6) Click on the file twice to select it

7) From the "Manage Attachments" window click on "Upload" button.

8) Slide down a bit in this window and confirm all the attachments were successful.

9) Close the "Manage Attachments" window.

10) Click the "Preview Post" button to see what the message will look like.

11) Submit your reply when your message text construction is complete.

One thing to keep in mind when preparing your photos before attaching, is to make sure they are under 2MB in size each and that their dimensions are not over 2000 pixels in both vertical and horizontal directions. That will mean the max resolution for a photo will probably be from 150 ppi to not over 300 ppi.

When taking a photo with a digital camera, have the camera set to take photos with a resolution size of not more that about 4.3MP (megapixels). That seems to be about the max that the AACA Forum site can handle. Try not to take shots under 1.3MP though. They do not have enough detail.

Hope all this helps! ;)

How to Add Photos to AACA Posts.pdf

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