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starter stuck on, almost caught fire.


Jerrys 49
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If you have old cloth wire, and you see sparks in a section of that wire that you have to hold together. You definetly have to replace the faulty wire. If it is sparking in the switch, then the switch is either bad, or out of adjustment. If the cloth is brittle on all the wires and breaks apart with some flexing, then it is time for a new wiring harness. Dandy Dave!

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The first thing I did on both my 41 buicks was to disconnect the carb switch in favor of a under dash momentary switch. Also gives you the option of not pressing the pedal to the floor which is desirable in some starting situations.

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Willie.. I started her up and let her get hot. Turned her off and same situation. SO, I jumped the starter solenoid like you said. The starter motor ran but did not engage the flywheel. Not sure if this is what is supposed to happen. I am going to try and jump the carb switch now..

Jerry

1949 Roadmaster

Jerry the solenoid wire/terminal is the smallest on the back of the solenoid. If you inadvertently jumped 6v to the terminal closest to the starter if will spin the starter only. If actually jumping to the small solenoid terminal only spins the starter then the solenoid or starter is defective.

Willie

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Willie.. I jumped 6 volt to the terminal facing the front of the vehicle that has the copper strap connecting it to the starter (not the terminals with wires). This terminal was the one that DOES NOT have the positive battery cable connected to it. Was I supposed to jump 6volt to the small terminal on the back with the wire? If so, those are not different in size.

Jerry

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Dave.. yes pretty much all of my wires are brittle with the exception of the ones under the dash. All the engine wires are crusty. I realize I must buy a new wiring harness, but I wish to buy one made in the original fashion (cloth and braided with bullet terminals already crimped on). YNZ's has one, but will cost me $1000.

If the problem is the carb switch ( i know my wires are old), how would one adjust that? I took it apart last night and I can not see any adjustment area on it. Just a spring which connects the switch to the carb mount..

Jerry

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Those wires SCARE me........I would encase with sleeves, or GENTLY tape. Picture two looks as thought BARE wires are showing, and could be shorting out. IMO

I wish you well,

Dale in Indy

No Foolin... :eek:. Me is scare't too. You can repair your old harness yourself a lot cheeper than a grand. Here is a link to a good Friend of mine that has replacement cloth wire with a modern core.

Lee W. Pedersen Antique Engine Supplies

The ends can be had at most any auto parts store, or electrical supply house. If you wish to not have the plastic piece on the connectors, The take it off and crimp and then solder the ends to the wire.

Starter pictures up loaded fine. How about one of the switch on the carb. Dandy Dave!

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The first thing I did on both my 41 buicks was to disconnect the carb switch in favor of a under dash momentary switch. Also gives you the option of not pressing the pedal to the floor which is desirable in some starting situations.

Although not original, I do have to agree with Tom on this. It is much better when starting a hot engine where some of the fuel may have boiled out of the carb and down the manifold. Dandy Dave!

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Yes that looks like my Carb switch. I know i have old wires, but still I don't believe the wires are the culprit for my problem at hand.. I am going to replace the wires though. I don't think the engine while hot is not starting due to old wires.. something is getting hot and malfunctioning I think. I started her up yesterday, let the engine get hot, and she fired right up like a charm multiple times. So I took her out and cruised around the highway for about 40 minutes. When i went back home I turned her off and once again the car would not start. No click... nothing. Not a sound. Under the hood gets extremely hot btw.. voltage regulator practically burns the hand when i touch it.normal temp? Curious.. inside the cab gets real hot too, although I think that may be because I'm missing the hoses that are for the vent/heat functions therefore allowing hot air from the engine to enter the hose areas into the cab.

My starter Guy said the solenoid and starter worked fine under his heat tests.. he also said the generator was in real good condition. The only thing that I could think that would malfunction due to heat would be my solenoid though.. weird.

Jerry

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Jerry

The confusion :confused: continues, on my part anyway. I did look at a 49 starter before posting the instructions on jumping the solenoid, only problem it was not a series 70 which apparently has a different starter and solenoid!:eek: The other series have a separate starter relay, and apparently the series 70 has that integrated in the solenoid, so you cannot jump in the traditional manner.

So as not to create sparks at the vacuum switch on the carburetor, get a remote starter switch and attach to the 2 terminals on the carb switch and activate when you have a no-start condition; if still no start the problem is in the starter area, most likely the starter relay or solenoid.

(I'm going to crawl back under my 55 and mind my own business...I know about 60 series):o

Willie

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Willie! No problem I appreciate your wisdom regardless.. I did not jump the solenoid so not to fret! I did however swap out my voltage regulator (for shits and giggles).. the one i had on was the one it came with. The one i put on is a new one i bought, but Im not sure if it works since the new one dies not go into the "charge" mode on my meter.. the old one is always in "charge" mode as long as I press the accelerator. So..... I took her out for an hour ride, brought her back hone and turned her off. I waited for 15 min. Or so and jumped back into the drivers seat. BOOM! she starts right up like a charm!! I have been testing her out intermittently now for the last hour and she's starting up every time..

Ok.. so now I'm wondering though if this new voltage reg is defective as far as charging goes... the whole hour while I was cruising the ammeter never went to the charge side.. and if I put the headlights on the meter was constantly in the discharge side.

Would a bad voltage regulator cause my hot start problem?? The old one was very hot to the touch when i turned her off.

Jerry

Btw.. I absolutely love belonging to this message board. You guys are VERY helpful and I appreciate it.. I'm only 34 so these ol cars are a whole new world for me.. thank you.

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It could be. Or it could be not hooked up correctly. I would have to study a wire schmatic for your car for a few minutes to be sure the starter connections running to it are correct. Being a GM vehicle it should have the posts marked Field (FLD), Armature, (ARM), Battery (BAT), and some voltage regulators have an" L" Terminal for "Load" which usually ran to the light switch. The FLD and ARM go to the generator. The generator will have corresponding letters stamped in it. and the BAT terminal runs up to the ampmeter in the dash and then back to the hot lead with the battery cable on the starter post. It could also be that you do not have the correct replacement regulator. The regulator has to match the generator. Dandy Dave!

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Matt. Great advice.. often times forgotten. I did polarize by means of touching the "batt" and "arm" terminals on the voltage regulator together with a long screwdriver.

Btw.. I left the ol Buick connected to my battery overnight as a test to see if she would fire up when i got home, or if the battery would be drained like it had a few months back. Good news.. she fired right up! I am still wondering though if my ammeter should be pushing a little more to the charging side when i step on the accelerator.. right now its just raising slightly pass neutral to the charging side... apparently my old regulator was constantly dipping to the charging side whenever the gas was pressed. May have been broke, but gave me a sense of security that my battery was being charged. When i put my headlights on, the ammeter is dipping closer to the discharge side and not raising towards the charging side even when i press the accelerator. But, she fires right up! :)

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Jerry;I would leave it alone for now,I think your problem was the cut in cut out,the regulator has 3 contacts ,volts,charge rate,cut in cut out.Kind of works like a pressure switch on a household water pump.I think your regulator was cut in [on] placing demand on the generator but did not cut out after you shut the car off[was still cut in/on draining your battery and leaving the generator on so to speak.your new regulator may be "set" for a lower charge rate,but i think the cut in cut off is correct.The lights on,car at idle will produce a discharge because you are running a generator not an alternator,it needs more speed.Run it for awhile maybe your battery is up and doesn't need much rate/charge. MARK

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Use a multi meter on the battery posts. You should have 6 plus volts when it is sitting. When it is running, it should have 7 plus to 8. The amp meter will show a charge usually when the car is first started and then drop off slightly. It is not good to have it over charge either, because it will boil the acid out of the battery. Dandy Dave!

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