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Dodge Brothers "convertible" closed cars


brian j
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Hi. I ran across some old advertising, and one of the questions nagging me is how the Dodge Brothers "convertible" closed cars were constructed. I have a 1919 "convertible" coupe that in 1919 began having non-operable components, such as wood "A", and "B" posts. I was under the impression that the earlier cars had a removable top also, to make it a true open top. The part that doesn't make sense to me in that is the rear of the car top is metal, and unless that area was detachable, it would look odd with the top off. Looking at this old advertising it looks as if only the posts were removed, and the windows lowered, making it an "open" closed car. I have doubts that the top was supposed to be removed. If that makes any sense. I noted also that the cars were the typical Blue/Black paint scheme, but the lower side panels of the car were a gray color,(as is John Dodges 1919 ,his last car, in the Detroit Historical Museum), with gold(or yellow) pinstripe outlining the gray panel. I also noted the cream colored wire wheels, with black hub lugs,black lock ring, and white tires.(John Dodges car has black tread whitewall tires, but his are not high pressure wire type wheels) So is it reasonable to assume the paint scheme for these closed car "convertibles" are as pictured in the old advertising? Does someone know for sure that the older (1917/1918) tops came off also? Regards.

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1917 convertible sedan ( as it was called ) was just that in that the side windows could be entirely removed and stored along with the center post pillars in a narrow compartment in the back of rear seat cushion.

During the 1917 season ( I don't know if I have an exact date ) a convertible coupe was introduced with the same appointments as the convertible sedan ( center door ) .

As mentioned previously ( in another post ) 1918 the convertible coupe capacity was increased from two to three passengers beginning with serial number 258848.

Feb 1919 prod was concluded of the center door conv. sedan affective with serial number 317857, in its place and beginning with serial number 317858 was a conventional 4 door sedan.

The hard-top convertible coupe likewise was replaced by a conventional 5 window coupe in April 1919 affective serial # 334379 and no 334380

To answer your questions I don't think first of all that you can reference what the color were on John Dodges auto, he had enough money to make most anything happen with with own cars, my opinion if you wanted the car correct would be to seek out factory literature ( some of which I have already shared here ) and only then will you have the original paint schemes that were offered to the general public.

Your model car never had a roof that was designed to be removed ( I have given you word for word verbatim above partially substantiating this )

While Dodge Bros cars prior to your model I.E. roadster and touring cars were avail with a removable top and fully enclosed side curtains these were offered at an additional cost and the tops were as far as I can tell supplied by what would first maybe be called an outside vendor but seemingly ( as from what I am learning ) this vendor ( Rex being one company ) became further or more deeply woven into the Dodge Bros. line-up.

I am sure that it was a great disappointment to Rex manufacturing, and other companies such as the Anchor Buggy company ( another vendor that supplied D.B removable tops ) to see the introduction of the more conventional hard top style or fully enclosed style body in 1919.

Few people consider / realize the damages that were placed upon some of these companies by these constant improvement changes.

For instance and as another example it is not generally known that the reason for N.E great success as well as its eventual passing was mostly revolved around its starter generator system almost initially and in great numbers used by Dodge Brothers and the the decision later to go with the separate units but that is getting off track here I suppose.

Hope this helps

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Thanks Jason. Great info. I really didn't want to beat this color thing to death, but after seeing the advertising, i just had to be clear on this. I'm very detail oriented, so if question marks are floating around in my noggin, you can be assured i won't let it go until i'm completely satisfied. I owe you some tool pics, so i'll get off my duff, and get them to you. Thanks again, and Regards.

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Brian, I could be wrong on anything I mention, I am pretty careful and try to get things right but I am always open to correction so no problem.

I am not sure what you mean by advertising as I see no mention of colors on the advertising you shared above so maybe you could clarify where you have seen information that contradicts what I have told you.

BTW you dont owe me a thing but it would be nice. :)

Please lay them individually on something clean and white and maybe have something ( yardstick ) in the picture as well as a referance for size and I will get back with you if there is anything more needed. Thanks jhason2@yahoo.com

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Hi Jason. It doesn't show the colors in the advertising. But it does show the detail. There's a color pic on the internet, that show John Dodges' car at the Detroit Historical Museum. That's where i got the gray side cue. It's painted identical to the advertising with the exception of the wood spoke wheels, which are painted as you described to me. I travel to that area yearly to visit relatives, so sometime this year i'm going to try to get together with the Curator and pick his brain for info also. I can also do the tool pics as you wish on a white background with tape measure. Regards

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