Jump to content

"Penn" Automobile Company


Guest

Recommended Posts

I am a freelance writer seeking information on an obscure, and short-lived automobile company that, I think, existed in the Pittsburgh, Pa. area in the early 20th century. Either it or its cars were called "Penn." When it closed, it was rumored to be headed to a new facility in my hometown of New Castle Pa. That new facility was never built and the company disappeared. Can anyone out there help me find more information about this company? confused.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Automobile Quarterly's <I>The American Car Since 1775</I> lists the make as "Penn Thirty", "Penn" having been used twice prior to 1911. <P>It states that the car was made in East Liberty (a neighborhood in Pittsburgh) and New Castle. It gives dates of 1911-1913, but doesn't specify which location at any given date.<P>I hope that helps. smile.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are two Penn cars. One is the aforementioned 1912 roadster. The other is a 1911 Penn 30 touring now in the Frick museum in Pittsburgh with other Pittsburgh area cars. Several years ago, the touring belonged to my father and it was toured on Reliability tours. It has a Buda engine and three spd transmission. At one point, Penn's had a New Castle connection that we tried to trace, but did not come across anything there. Good luck. smile.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Penn: 1911-1913 by Penn Motor Car Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. The Penn 30 had a 4-cylinder engine of 3.7 litres. It was built in two-seater&five-seater versions, both with 8'9" wheelbases.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Sputnik64,<BR>Here is the entry on the Penn from the Beaulieu Encyclopedia of the Automobile:<P>PENN (1911-12)<BR>Penn Motor Car Co, Pittsburgh, PA<BR>The Penn was a conventional car powered by a 3.7 litre 30 hp 4 cylinder engine, and made in two open models, a 2-seater roadster and a 5-seater tourer. For 1912 they added a Comet roadster, which was presumably more sporting, and a 45hp chassis. In 1912 they moved into a new factory at New Castle, PA, but no cars were made there as their backers pulled out and bankruptcy followed. The Canadian McKay was based on the Penn Thirty, and was manufactured in Nova Scotia between 1911 and 1914.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...
Guest BruceW

The AACA has a large Library & Research Center located in Hershey, Pa. With their thousands of pieces of literature, they are a good resource of automotive information, especially for rare and obscure makes. The L&RC has an information request form online that you can send in for information. The staff is always very willing to help on research projects. You can contact the librarian, Kim Miller for more info or look at their webpage.

AACA LIBRARY & RESEARCH CENTER

501 West Governor Road

P.O. Box 417

Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: (717) 534-2082

email: kmiller@aacalibrary.org

web page: www.aaca.org/library

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...