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Engine paints?


jpage
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I need to get some engine paint for my Dodge and was wondering who's is the best. I've only ever heard of Bill Hirsch and Eastwood. I've used Hirsch's product with good appearance results but I need something that will hold off the rust. I see Eastwood's paint has ceramic in it,I'm not familiar with ceramic paints or their qualities. What are your thoughts?

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Depending upon which model of Dodge it is and which engine's in it, if it's of the "modern" variety, you can purchase engine paint from Mopar Performance, going back to about 1960, I believe? By the same token, you can probably get a local paint store to mix some if you have a good item to match.

BEFORE Chrysler was selling any engine paint other than Hemi Orange, I needed some for my '67 Newport. In looking at color chip charts, we determined that a "close match" for the turquoise engine paint was "Desert Turquoise" Dodge pickup paint, circa 1966. The parts store mixed me some of it in Sherwin-Williams acrylic enamel. I got a PreVal sprayer setup, recently on the market at that time, added some carb cleaner (Berryman's B-12 to thin it a little) and painted a new oil pan I got for the car with that mixture. I also did some other touch-up on the engine with it, too. It was a perfect match, had expected gloss characteristics, AND still looks good 30 years later. I suspect the original engine paint was a lesser grade of enamel paint, though, so the paint I had mixed in acrylic enamel is a better paint.

Just some thoughts . . .

NTX5467

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If its rust that you are worried about, Then you need to make sure you prep the engine very well. Make sure the surface is well degreased and use a phosphoric acid metal prep. Hirsch, Eastwood and Por-15 all make quality engine paints. I was once told by an auto paint store person that engine paints are most of the time just regular acrylic enamel that they put a different label on. I have never been able to verify this but the cost of paint for your car engine is peanuts compared to the rest of the car so it is just as easy to use real engine paint.

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The engine was cleaned and blasted when it as rebuilt several years ago. It was primed and painted with Krylon aluminum paint but sat for several years in storage. The cast iron has started to rust under the paint as they all would do eventually so I'm in the process of stripping and repainting it in the chassis,that's why I need a brushable paint. I'm priming it by brush with non sanding acrylic enamel primer that I've had for a while and that seems to do a good job. I'm hoping the commercial engine paints have more body and give more protection than just regular Rustoleum or good spray paints. I was curious about the ceramic paint that Eastwood carries. What makes it special and is it superior to other brands? This is a '30's Dodge so I just need a universal silver.

Edited by jpage (see edit history)
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Hey JP,Believe everything you ever heard regarding Bill Hirschs engine enamel,it's NOT coming off and the brush on has outstanding shine with no brush marks.It's not cheap.......BUT you only do it ONCE.diz

Ditto. I have had Hirsch paint on an engine for 15 years and it still looks great. Highly resistant to gas, oil, antifreeze, etc.

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I'm priming it by brush with non sanding acrylic enamel primer that I've had for a while and that seems to do a good job. I'm hoping the commercial engine paints have more body and give more protection than just regular Rustoleum or good spray paints.

Others can weigh in, but it seems to me that if you are using a cheap primer then the paint over that will only hold up as well as the primer. I used a very good epoxy primer and it has held up....OK I guess, except on the hottest surfaces. Brushing vs spraying is no problem IMO. What do we think? Todd C

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You don't need special hi-temp paint to do a water-cooled motor. Ordinary body paint will work fine. I picked that tidbit up at from a respected restorer at the AACA convention this year. Having said that, I do like the Hirsch engine paint. It goes on quite smoothly with a brush. If you make a mistake, it wipes off with lacquer thinner, even after it dries (hopefully, it won't come off with gasoline!).

Phil

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Body paint does work great and on many show vehicles that is what was used. Personally having done it both ways for me the Hirsch seemed to hold up better with the occasional drips especially if you are going to have more of a driver than a show vehicle. The rattle can Hirsch paint also works great.

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If you have a good, clean engine block, is the Hirsch paint applied directly to that metal with no primer?

If I'm not mistaken, on the cast iron, no primer would be needed. On other metals, yes, a primer is needed. If I am mistaken, please correct me if I am wrong.

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Hirsh works and looks great as a brushable on cast iron right out of the can, slightly thinned to spray on sheet metal. No primer on cast iron, primer of choice on sheet metal. Just the right shade and gloss of silver/grey without that gaudy silver paint look. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.....................Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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I'm stll curios about the Eastwood paint. Any users out there,we'd like to hear from you!

Eastwood paint will not last near as long as Hirsch and has issues with engine compartment drips. I used it once and within 2 years removed as it marred extremely easy. Recommend Hirsch be applied directly to clean metal. NO primer.

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Speaking of Hirsch paints, I see that they also sell paints for the intake and exhaust manifolds. Here's a question for you. What color would these be painted? Also, was it different colors, depending on what car year, model, and make. I guess my real question would have to be what would be the correct color for my 37 Pontiac?

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Jim ,I don't know the colors for your car ,I'm guessing in most cases the exhaust would probably been left raw or painted engine color but would soon burn off. I have used Krylon High heat silver on my "A" exhaust with very good results. Did not burn or flake but I did have to touch it up after winter storage because of slight rust. I have also used HIrsch stainless steel coating and it seem ok too.

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It'l be down the road before I do this (painting the engine and such), but after I restored the 2 horns and the air silencer which holds the air filter, the rest under the hood looks bad! According to Hirsch paints, the type used for the manifolds are rated up to 2000 degrees. The bad thing though is that I will have to do all of this while the engine is still in the car.

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Jim , Those engines shouldn't be too hard to strip down ,which would make cleaning and painting alot easier. That stainless manifold paint is brushable and dries pretty quick but it requires a clean surface. I used to breakdown my Ford "A" engine each spring for cleaning and touch up,after 16 yrs.it looked as good as the day we put it in! I liked the Krylon products because it had a lacquer base and dried quick with a hard finish. Used it on alot of parts and the hi-heat silver is good. The black high heat not so much--it will flake. After all the priming I did on my engine I might just use a can of Rustoleum!

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