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marlin65

Cruise-in comments

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Once a month I attend the town of Dade City,Fl's cruise-in.There is usually 200-300 cars,mostly modified and some butchered cars there and some very nice stock ones also.I drive my 1964 Corvair conv and the urban legends really are comical.Everything from Ralph Nader,oil leaks,belt tossing,these were 4 cylinders weren't they etc.One lady was telling her friend that these were banned from the road because the front end lifted off the ground at 40 MPH.When I asked her where she heard this she assured me she was right.I offered to take her for a ride but she declined and moved on.One man came along sat down next to me and was telling me he had a mint 1928 Chevy coupe up north.I was all ears until he told me it had a 350 V/8,Mustang front end and God knows what else.

My Vair is usually the only one there and it never fails to draw comments.I even invite people to sit behind the wheel and relive memories of when they had one.Can't wait till my 62 Corvair ex-Bell telephone truck is done!

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Well you certainly have your explaining work to do, and I hope you did!

Yes, they throw belts, only when the wrong type is used. Yes they leak everywhere, because the guy who put the wrong type of belt on threw the belt causing the engine to overheat and now all the seals get brittle.

How did you handle telling the guy he no longer really had a 28 Chevy?

D.

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helfan,I didn't,just bit my tongue and pretended I didn't hear what he said.Deep down though I wanted to strangle him.LOL.

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I stopped going to cruise ins around here a few years back. All of them are dominated by cars like the '28 Chevy you describe, along with quasi-muscle cars and real ones that have been mostly modified. Some of them are very nice cars, but generally they're owned by people who could care less about the kinds of cars I like.

For years I've had a fantasy of pulling in among all the Chevelles and street rods with an immaculate Stanley Steamer. You just have to wonder what the reaction would be when the all attention's been diverted from powercurves to psi's.:P

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I sometimes go to a local weekend morning cruise-in called Cars and Croissants. Very few hot rods, but a lot of modern and expensive exotica like Ferraris, Lotuses, Lambos as well as Alfas, restored VW Beetles and campers, a few British sports cars and an occasional enormous befinned, bechromed behemoth from the 60s. I take brass, and draw just as big a crowd as the family with matching vanity plates that brings three Ferraris. A couple of times I have taken a Stanley. Now, I'm still a relative Stanley newbie; when I light the beast up to go home, it becomes quite a media event, but I'm concentrating too much on not doing anything stupid to devote much of my attention to a teach-in. One time, an attractive woman described what steps I was taking, and why. The assorted gear heads ignored her, figuring she couldn't possibly know anything about steam cars. She sensed this, and said she and her husband had a couple of Stanleys; this got a few guys to listen. Then I quit concentrating long enough to say: "And, by the way, this is Sarah Stanley Davidson, the great-granddaughter of F. E. Stanley, who built this thing." You could just about hear their bones clank as they snapped to attention - it was a riot!

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ

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I roll into a large local cruise night filled with "meh" cars with the '29 Cadillac and people go wild for it. For two hours straight there's a crowd around it, all positive. When I tell them it's a V8, the transmission is synchromesh, and that it'll go 60 MPH, they're usually stunned ("I thought these old cars only went 30 MPH..."). Then I tell them I drive it 2-3000 miles a year without doing any more than putting gas in it, and they're flabbergasted. Surely you need a Chevy crate motor to do that!

I started it up, then a guy came up and wanted to talk, so I got out and talked while it was running. Nobody could even hear it or feel the vibrations. One woman got close enough to feel the woosh of the fan on her face and jumped back startled and yelled, "Oh my god, it's running!" People who don't know any better are VERY impressed by how good old cars can be, they just don't have any experience with them to realize this.

We need to get the original cars out there and circulating to prove to folks that you don't need to cut it up to make it reliable, comfortable and fun.

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Then I quit concentrating long enough to say: "And, by the way, this is Sarah Stanley Davidson, the great-granddaughter of F. E. Stanley, who built this thing." You could just about hear their bones clank as they snapped to attention - it was a riot!

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ

That. Is. Awesome.

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Deep down though I wanted to strangle him.LOL.

And I get banned because I am accused of being stupid by Gariepy.

Folks... they are not ruined until they are crushed.

Modifying an old car is NOT a punishable offense, nor should it be.

And wanting to kill someone who has a street rod, and then laughing about it is BS! Period.

I consider myself a hot rodder, yet have never owned anything but stock antiques.

I am sick and tired of the haters in this hobby - there is no excuse for close-mindedness.

You wonder why it is so hard to get new members in the old car hobby?

Idiotic spewing like the above quote is why.

Now I will step off my soapbox.

Edited by Studemax (see edit history)

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Folks... they are not ruined until they are crushed.

Sadly that's not true. Many if not most street rods have been modified beyond the state where they could be returned to stock condition by any practical means. Those that haven't been physically so modified are often de facto beyond redemption because the parts and materials needed to do so are too rare to be practically available (and have frequently been disposed of during the street rodding process).

It isn't an issue with cars that are commonly available, but about 15 years ago it became fashionable to street rod rare cars that (frequently) were previously restored antiques. The bad blood created by that practice may never be overcome.

Also, almost all street rods will eventually be "crushed", or at least scrapped in some form once their modifications are no longer fashionable. A stock 1928 Chevy 40 years from now will be an historical artifact of value, inconvenient for the road for sure but of intrinsic value none the less. A '28 Chevy in 40 years that's just an old body shell stuffed with antiquated/obsolete performance parts that are no longer street worthy due to fuel changes and technological progress will just be a dead man's old toy that can't be played with any more. It's only value will likely be as dismantled for reuse. A lucky few may escape that fate, if there develops an "old street rod collector" hobby to absorb some. Most are just future Hyundais and Whirlpools waiting to happen.

That's why you hear such "idiotic spewings".

Edited by Dave@Moon (see edit history)

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About 30-60 of us local guys show up every Saturday morning with our favorite cars at a friends bakery for about two+ hours. We have guys from various clubs including AACA members. All of us have our own idea of what we like in cars or how we like our cars to look. I would say the majority of the friends I have there have street rods, but there is room and understanding for the purest. Last week everyone was all over two of my friends cars, a 1930 Cadillac V-16 and a 1931 V-12 Auburn.

I know many people have said that most of the street rods come from cars that would not have enough in them to be restored, but I can tell you ( and I heard it again yesterday ) street rodders say that the best way to be cost and time efficient is to buy a restored stock car and make your street rod build from there. That does bother me.

D.

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I take my '50 Packard to all the local cruise nights I can get to when the weather permits. It's true that the vast majority of cars there will be much newer than my car, modified, or buried in 'bling' but my totally stock, top-of-the-line bathtub Packard certainly stands out from the crowd. Nobody is going to mistake it for a bland, lookalike transportation appliance. Love it or hate it, the car has styling that was unique to a very short period in automotive history. Young guys just stare at the 356 ci straight eight behemoth under the hood (the hood that opens from the left, or the right, or lifts off completely for full engine access). Women tend to appreciate the wool upholstery, chrome and wood trim with ample room for 6 full sized adults. I think it's because my car is so different from what folks usually see at a cruise night that I get so much activity. I'm pretty sure that the outrageous, ostentatious, over-the-top chrome Cormorant hood ornament is one of the most photographed items at any cruise night I attend. I love going and answering questions about my car and Packards in general. Except maybe the question... "Who made Packard?" :)

6286-1949-custom-sedan-cormorant-hood-ornament.jpg

People actually thank me for bringing the car.

Edited by JD in KC (see edit history)

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Come on man, we (I) love those cars.... now post a complete picture of it!

D.

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For years I've had a fantasy of pulling in among all the Chevelles and street rods with an immaculate Stanley Steamer. You just have to wonder what the reaction would be when the all attention's been diverted from powercurves to psi's.:P<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

Dave, they'll probably think you're Jay Leno, 'cause they saw one "just like it" on his garage site (or perhaps that you work for him).

That said, let's be thankful for the new, trademarked AACA Original class of cars within the HPOF Class. Just got back from the Melbourne Winter Meet where several cars qualified for that honor, including a friend's '60 Buick Invicta flattop (a 62K-mile original). Just over a handful of the 17 cars going for it won in that inaugural group,

so now there's even more recognition and respect for originality.

TG

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I consider myself a hot rodder, yet have never owned anything but stock antiques.

I am sick and tired of the haters in this hobby - there is no excuse for close-mindedness.

You wonder why it is so hard to get new members in the old car hobby?

Idiotic spewing like the above quote is why.

Now I will step off my soapbox.

Very well said. Thank you!!

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Studemax, as an owner of both hot rods and stock antique cars,your comments on this site are similar to my thoughts, however, the owners of this site wish only to speak about original cars. It is their right.

One must remember that on the other hot rod site, if you speak of "Rat Rods" you will be tarred and feathered in a language that is not even acceptable on this site!

This bars me from speaking about a few of my cars on both sites. (;-)

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At the current rate of decline, folks who have any interest in cars may not have the luxury of so aggressively disliking other parts of the hobby.

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A few years back, our small town was having a car show, so my neighbor and I decided to bring out our old iron to display along side the high money engines on display. I took my 1920 Ford Model T Centerdoor and my 1912 Rauch & Lang Electric down into town for the show. The Electric is all original and not running, so I rolled it off the trailer and just had it sitting there. That Electric car had a crowd around it 5 people deep all day. I wore my voice out answering questions like "When was the electric conversion done?". One of the guys with a car that had an engine that cost more than all my cars put together expressed his opinion that my car should not be allowed to be at the show because it was not running. In reality I think he was jealous that people were more interested in my not-running 100 year old electric car than they were with his high priced hot-rod.

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...the urban legends really are comical.Everything from Ralph Nader,oil leaks,belt tossing,these were 4 cylinders weren't they etc.One lady was telling her friend that these were banned from the road because the front end lifted off the ground at 40 MPH...

Driving our '73 Pinto to old car events results in many similar-type occurrences!

It's just because they're JEALOUS, Marlin! Ha ha!

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Some of them are very nice cars, but generally they're owned by people who could care less about the kinds of cars I like.

How do you know? My only collector/collectable cars are newer Corvettes - this is where my wife and I choose to spend our money. However, we love other cars - one of my greatest thrills of a very eventful 2011 was waiting in the early morning chill on Saturday morning at Hershey and watching many cars from well before we were born drive in.

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Come on man, we (I) love those cars.... now post a complete picture of it!

D.

OK. Here's the car attached to the hood ornament.

6285-1949-custom-eight-touring-sedan-22nd.jpg

It's not the car I currently take to the local shows though. This is a 1949 22nd series. It's a work in progress. Currently suffering from a hemorrhaging differential, cranky shift linkage, and needs the carburetor re-built. Hopefully, I'll have it ready to show this Summer.

Edited by JD in KC
typo (see edit history)

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6285-1949-custom-eight-touring-sedan-22nd.jpg

Lovely car!

Currently suffering from a hemorrhaging differential ...

Aaack!

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Sadly that's not true. Many if not most street rods have been modified beyond the state where they could be returned to stock condition by any practical means. Those that haven't been physically so modified are often de facto beyond redemption because the parts and materials needed to do so are too rare to be practically available (and have frequently been disposed of during the street rodding process).

It isn't an issue with cars that are commonly available, but about 15 years ago it became fashionable to street rod rare cars that (frequently) were previously restored antiques. The bad blood created by that practice may never be overcome.

Also, almost all street rods will eventually be "crushed", or at least scrapped in some form once their modifications are no longer fashionable. A stock 1928 Chevy 40 years from now will be an historical artifact of value, inconvenient for the road for sure but of intrinsic value none the less. A '28 Chevy in 40 years that's just an old body shell stuffed with antiquated/obsolete performance parts that are no longer street worthy due to fuel changes and technological progress will just be a dead man's old toy that can't be played with any more. It's only value will likely be as dismantled for reuse. A lucky few may escape that fate, if there develops an "old street rod collector" hobby to absorb some. Most are just future Hyundais and Whirlpools waiting to happen.

That's why you hear such "idiotic spewings".

At one car show about 15 years ago, someone had a extremely nice restored (I think it had a national AACA award) 1935 Cadillac V-8 convertible sedan. In talking with the owner (he had recently purchased it), I discovered that he intended to hot rod it "because it would be worth more money." This is what gets many people like me: almost sort of a bragging attitude that the rodder wants to turn a very well restored car (in this case rare to boost) into a hot rod. Why not buy a reproduction body of a 30's car?

Once an original, restored car is rodded, it is gone. I bought the complete running gear (frame, engine, axles, interior, bumpers--basically everything except the body shell) from someone who was taking are restored 1936 Chevrolet cabriolet (an uncommon car...) to make a rod. All he wanted was the sheet metal--seemed to me like a waste of an excellent car.

At least several times I've had people approach me when I've had the 36 Chevy out and ask when I was going to drop in the 350 (and maybe put on mag wheels). Conversely, though, I've never approached the owner of a modified car and asked them when they were going to restore it back to original.

Edited by 36chev (see edit history)

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JC in KC, the Packard is beautiful. One of my most memorable auto experiences was spending 4 days at the Packard 100 year celebration in Warren Ohio in 1999.

As for the cars at shows and cruise-ins, a person needs to determine what they want to see before they plan where to go. I look for AACA shows but some of the AACA chapters will stage shows that seem to welcome and cater to more street rods than antiques. After you attend a few of them you learn which ones you will probably enjoy and which ones you will not enjoy. I enjoy seeing a few modified cars but if a show is predominately that kind of vehicles I usually pass on going to the event.

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I drove my 1912 T Touring to a few local Cruise Nights, it was fun, people liked it. As with car shows I don't bother hanging around my car, I'd rather look at others. The quality of Cruise Nights has gone down hill in the last 5 years, NEW CAR dealerships are sending over salesmen and new stuff. We started driving the 1985 Ford over as a joke, it did allow us to park closer.

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About rodding restored cars, I bought this Oldsmobile from an old gent who was deathly afraid that one of his relatives would drop a 455 into it. He had owned and babied it for 35 years. He even showed up at my place a year later(a 600 mile drive) to check on his baby and was greatly relieved to see I hadn't done something to it.

post-59904-143138893154_thumb.jpg

post-59904-14313889316_thumb.jpg

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