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Thanks for that link!

THAT's the kind of advertising informercial that couldn't be made in modern times, but as a "showcase of engineering capabilities" in the 1961 era, it was typical for back then.

As a general "drive around car", the Corvair was one way to get Americans into smaller cars, back then. It had many of the attributes of GM cars of that era, as in a soft ride on all road surfaces, but in a more maneuverable size with greater fuel economy.

There was mention that had GM kept with the original-proposal aluminum engine, rather than the production cast iron version, the "pendulum effect" of the rear end would have been diminished, which also would have affected the "jacking" situation somewhat, some have claimed. After the '65 upgrades, the rear suspension was much more like the production Corvettes of the time, which was a big improvement. But the engine size was pretty much locked in to what it was . . . at a time when more horsepower was a selling point. So with no money or inclination for a new engine, the Corvair was allowed to fade away.

The Corvair was an interesting car, but it was a little too different to gain wide and continued acceptance . . . especially after the unusual handling characteristics came to light.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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I have always been fascinated with the the Corvair. It's too bad Gm Execs did not listen to the Ford corporate spies, that a few weeks before the public release in late '59, expressed reservations about the emergency handling and the extreme camber movement. The 'spies' thought the average American was unprepared for the characteristics of a straight swing axel, and one where the engine was mounted so far the the rear of the car. Most cars of that design mounted the engine closer to the differential (VW). Kind of flinging a hammer into the air and guessing which end will hit the wall first. Too bad Cole never spent $10 per car more for camber compensators or outer CV joints. Still dig 'em though, especially the 2nd generation '65s+. Re. the engine weight. The original specs were,I believe, was to be 250 lbs, but the production model came in at @325. I thought all 'vairs had aluminum engines??

Edited by rons49 (see edit history)
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I have always been fascinated with the the Corvair. It's too bad Gm Execs did not listen to the Ford corporate spies, that a few weeks before the public release in late '59, expressed reservations about the emergency handling and the extreme camber movement. The 'spies' thought the average American was unprepared for the characteristics of a straight swing axel, and one where the engine was mounted so far the the rear of the car. Most cars of that design mounted the engine closer to the differential (VW). Kind of flinging a hammer into the air and guessing which end will hit the wall first. Too bad Cole never spent $10 per car more for camber compensators or outer CV joints. Still dig 'em though, especially the 2nd generation '65s+. Re. the engine weight. The original specs were,I believe, was to be 250 lbs, but the production model came in at @325. I thought all 'vairs had aluminum engines??

_________________________________________________________

No, your right about Cole. The interesting part was in another film where all three of the compacts were compared and I was blown away watching the Ford Falcon on the skidpad roll over and the Corvair and Valiant wouldn't.

After Cole left Chevrolet, Pontiac general manager Bunkie Knudsen was positioned by GM to take over the spot at Chevrolet, but Knudsen refused to take the position unless he was able to change the suspension on the Corvair. With GM granting his demand Knudsen first changed spring rates and added a camber compensator by 64 and in 65 the rear suspension was heavily modified and double jointed.

There were some pretty fast Corvairs out there with the turbo option so there was no lacking for horsepower. When I was drag racing in the mid sixties there were some turbo Corvairs in the high 13's at or near 100mph in the quarter. In fact Don Yenko got his start racing Corvairs. His car was called the Stinger.

You must remember adding a bigger engine to a Corvair completely ignores why the car was designed in the first place.

D.

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There was mention that had GM kept with the original-proposal aluminum engine, rather than the production cast iron version, the "pendulum effect" of the rear end would have been diminished, which also would have affected the "jacking" situation somewhat, some have claimed. After the '65 upgrades, the rear suspension was much more like the production Corvettes of the time, which was a big improvement. But the engine size was pretty much locked in to what it was . . . at a time when more horsepower was a selling point. So with no money or inclination for a new engine, the Corvair was allowed to fade away.

The Corvair was an interesting car, but it was a little too different to gain wide and continued acceptance . . . especially after the unusual handling characteristics came to light.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

The Corvair engine was mostly aluminum except for cast iron cylinder jugs, which were very light.

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There was mention that had GM kept with the original-proposal aluminum engine, rather than the production cast iron version, the "pendulum

The Corvair was an interesting car, but it was a little too different to gain wide and continued acceptance

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

____________________________________________________________

Why do yo say different to gain acceptance? Volkswagen and Porsche cars had little problem gaining acceptance. I mean like over 21 million Beetles!

BTW Corvair engine cases and heads are aluminum.

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Years ago, I had a '62 4 door with the bigger engine (115 bhp?) and I always thought it was a really nice little car. I never had problems with the handling and it was a great little servant. I do recall I broke a diaphragm in the clutch pressure plate and wondered where I'd find a replacement but it was the same as a '39 and I had one of those laying under the bench !! Nader killed them.

Photo taken around 1974 with my 19 year old girlfriend who became and still is my darling little wife.

Al

Oh, just remembered I popped in a 4 speed when I did the clutch job. Al

post-56708-143138893151_thumb.jpg

Edited by Al Brass (see edit history)
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The video from Harry J is quite interesting.Notice the 3 slots in the panel below the front bumper on the drivers side. That was placed there for the horn but early problems with it clogging up with snow etc,the horn was moved.Today these "horn slot" models are very rare since it was deleted during the first two weeks of production.Production started early July 1959.There are only about 3 "horn slot" models known.

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I drove a 1961 Corvair when it was a 7 year old used car. Bias ply tires, swing axles, drum brakes and all. Never had an accident. It was one of the best cars for snow I ever drove, up there with the VW beetle, before front wheel drive became popular.

The danger of the Corvair was very overblown. This was proven by a US government investigation in 1972 which absolved the Corvair of being dangerous, 3 years after they went out of production, and which never seems to have been publicised.

It is amazing to me how people are still taken in by Ralph Nader's bullshit. I seem to be the only person who has actually read his book.

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Just bought a 64 Corvair Monza 4-door. Picking it up Monday morning out in Reading!

Everything I've researched thus far always has the Monza name attached to it. I've seen things saying that he was a designer and also another site said that their was a Monza package available that added a few features. Was there just a 'Corvair' or was it always a Corvair Monza?

post-83525-143138901154_thumb.jpg

post-83525-143138901182_thumb.jpg

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I had a small used car lot and in 69 and I purchaced a Corvair Monza convertable from a Chevy dealer that had a "blown engine". I adjusted the valves, polished it up and put it on the lot. I had four dealers try to buy it off of me.

One of the nicest car I ever drove.

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My first car was a '64 Corvair. My aunt and uncle had two of them and I always thought they were fun little cars, so when started college and needed transportation, I decided a Corvair would be just the ticket. Mine was a black 700 4 door with red cloth and a 3 speed manual. I think the only option was the AM tube radio. I thought it would be good in snow since I was commuting daily and with no radiator, one less thing to worry about. The car was 4 years old and had just turned 49K. Mechanically, it turned out to be one of the two worst cars I ever owned (pretty close tie with my 1990 Dodge Dynasty). I bought the Corvair in September '68 and kept it until May '69 when I traded it on a '64 Falcon. I don't remember all that went wrong with it now - I do remember having to replace head gaskets a couple of times, but the final straw was when it started sucking exhaust fumes through the heater. The last month I had it, I had to ride around with the windows down. My local mechanic said the only thing he could think of was to cut the heater lines so the fumes wouldn't get into the car. I went to the local Chevy dealer, explained the problem, and was told they didn't work on Corvairs unless I bought it from them - which I didn't. This while they were still selling new '69s. So, I traded it. As ironic as it seems, I've always wanted another one, particularly a '65-'67 4 door hardtop. I think they are gorgeous cars.

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Just bought a 64 Corvair Monza 4-door. Picking it up Monday morning out in Reading!

Everything I've researched thus far always has the Monza name attached to it. I've seen things saying that he was a designer and also another site said that their was a Monza package available that added a few features. Was there just a 'Corvair' or was it always a Corvair Monza?

There were also models called the "500," "700," and "Corsa," along with a few others. Monzas were usually the most popular. Sign up over at corvaircenter.com to speed up your learning curve about these things. Good luck with it!

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dminer

Re: Corvair

Just bought a 64 Corvair Monza 4-door. Picking it up Monday morning out in Reading!

Everything I've researched thus far always has the Monza name attached to it. I've seen things saying that he was a designer and also another site said that their was a Monza package available that added a few features. Was there just a 'Corvair' or was it always a Corvair Monza?

1 Day Ago 06:55

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In 1960, the first year for the car, the entry level Corvair was the 2 dr. 500.

Top level Corvair was the 700 sedan.

The sporty version and most expensive was the Monza.

In 1961 Corvair gains a station wagon called the Lakewood, Corvair also debuted a truck line called the Corvair 95, and a Greenbriar wagon.

The entry level 500 retired after 1961.

In 1962 Monza gains a station wagon, and also a sporty model in convertible form called the Spyder with a turbocharged 150hp engine.

1963 There is a new coupe, called the Monza Spyder coupe with the 150 hp turbocharged engine.

1964 the suspension changes becomes reality and engine changes from 145 cid. to 164 cid., thanks to Bunkie Knudsen who came over from Pontiac to take over Chevrolet in 1962.

In 1965 the final season is for the Greenbriar station wagon (CORVAN).

Corvair gets a completely new body and a fully independent rear suspension, similar to the 1963 Pontiac Tempest redesigned transaxle.

1965 will also see the new name...The Corsa

D.

BTW, The name Monza is not a person, the Corvair Monza is named for the famous race track in Italy MONZA!

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helfen,some minor corrections:the original 60 Corvair's were only 4 dr sedans both 500&700's. The coupe came a little later.In May the Monza was introduced in coupe only.In 1961 a Monza sedan was built.There was a 500 series Corvair thru the end of production in 1969.The Spyder was both a coupe and conv in 1962,1963 &1964. In 1964 the Spyder was a model not just an option. The Greenbrier was sold as a wagon.The pick-up's and panel (Corvan) were sold as trucks.The Corsa was either the 4 carb 140 horse or the turbo in 1965 Ed

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helfen,some minor corrections:the original 60 Corvair's were only 4 dr sedans both 500&700's. The coupe came a little later.In May the Monza was introduced in coupe only.In 1961 a Monza sedan was built.There was a 500 series Corvair thru the end of production in 1969.The Spyder was both a coupe and conv in 1962,1963 &1964. In 1964 the Spyder was a model not just an option. The Greenbrier was sold as a wagon.The pick-up's and panel (Corvan) were sold as trucks.The Corsa was either the 4 carb 140 horse or the turbo in 1965 Ed

There was a 700 through 1964. When the restyle came out in '65, the 700 was dropped so there was the 500, Monza and Corsa. As I recall, the Corsa and 4 door hardtop were both dropped after '67.

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Apparently there is more than one source/fact book out there.

[edit]Production notes

Year Production Base Price Notes

1960 253,268 US$1,984–2,238 500 and 700 4-door sedan are only models available at introduction; 500 and 700 Club Coupe become available January 1960, Monza Club Coupe introduced spring 1960 with 95 hp (71 kW) "Super Turbo Air" high performance engine option, and 4-speed transmission, gas heater optional, spare tire mounted in luggage compartment, central automatic choke. Sales impeded by U.S. Steel strike shortly after introduction, causing a shortage of new 1960 models. Monza is the first Chevrolet model with 'narrow' 1 in (25 mm) stripe whitewall tire.

1961 337,371 US$1,920–2,331 Lakewood station wagon, Greenbrier, Corvan, and Loadside and Rampside pickups added; 145 in³ engine and optional three-speed manual; spare tire now rear-mounted on models not equipped with mid 1961 All Weather Air Conditioning option. Manual choke. First full year of Monza production demonstrates its sales success, pushes Ford to develop Falcon Sprint and eventually Mustang to exploit the small sporty car market uncovered by Corvair Monza.

1962 336,005 US$1,992–2,846 Monza Convertible and Turbocharged Monza Spyder added mid-1962, heavy duty suspension optional with front anti roll bar, rear axle limit straps, positraction differential, new Monza full wheel covers, Kelsey Hayes knock off wire wheels added to options, Monza wagon becomes available, 500 wagon dropped- wagons lose 'Lakewood' designation. Station wagons discontinued mid-1962 to provide capacity for other Corvair and Chevy II models.

1963 288,419 US$1,982–2,798 Self adjusting brakes and small engine improvements (belt guides, improved oil cooler), new Monza rocker moldings, Loadside pickup discontinued.

1964 214,483 US$2,000–2,811 Larger 164 CID engine, improved rear suspension with added transverse leaf spring and revised coil springs, front stabilizer bar added as standard, finned rear brake drums, new optional full wheel covers-std. for Monza with specific centers, new Monza chrome rocker and wheel opening moldings, last year for Rampside pickup.

1965 247,092 US$2,066–2,665 Major redesign of the Corvair- all new Fisher Z body, hardtop styling for all models, 700 series discontinued, Corsa series replaces Monza Spyder series; Greenbrier discontinued mid-year after 1528 built; revised front and redesigned fully independent rear suspension, improved heater and air conditioning systems, numerous small engine and chassis refinements. Mid year introduction of Z17 'steering and suspension" option includes special springs with rates increased approximately 25%, special shock absorbers, a 16:1 steering box and special steering arms. New options include 140 hp (100 kW) engine, telescopic steering column, AM/FM, FM stereo, heavy duty oil bath air cleaner precleaner system with engine shrouding for dust control. Front Chevy emblem painted red.

1966 109,880 US$2,083–2,682 Improved 3 and 4-speed synchromesh manual transmissions; last year of Corsa model, Last year of Canadian production at Oshawa. Late 1965 modification to steering shaft adds a U-joint and floor reinforcement to reduce risks of column intrusion in collisions. Tire size upgraded to 7.00–13 from 6.50–13, with narrower .625 in (15.9 mm) whitewall. New "spoke" style wheel covers for all models with specific model centers. Front Chevy emblem now blue (remaining this color until the end of production). New optional equipment includes headrests, shoulder harnesses, 4-speaker Delco FM Stereo Multiplex, power rear antenna, 'Mag Style' (N96) wheelcovers. New, smaller condenser mounted behind the engine for air-conditioned cars. Four lap belts (2 front, 2 rear), padded instrument panel, larger taillight lenses, day/night rearview mirror, now standard on all models. Monzas and Corsas feature black crinkle finish on instrument panel.

1967  27,253 US$2,128–2,540 Last year for the four-door hardtop sedan, GM Energy Absorbing steering column, dual circuit brake system, stronger door hinges introduced. New safety three-spoke steering wheel standard. Four-way hazard flashers, lane-change turn signal control, additional padding on instrument panel cover, safety control knobs introduced. 110 hp (82 kW) engine is only optional engine at introduction; eventually 140 hp (100 kW) becomes available as Central Office Production Order in limited production as COPO 9551"B". New "safety" Powerglide shift knob, shoulder belt mount points added. New style standard hub caps for 500. Chrome ring inside taillight lenses widened. New options included Speed Warning, Delco Stereo Tape system. New thin-shell "Astro-bucket" front seats with new vinyl pattern standard on Monzas.

1968 15,399 US$2,243–2,626 Air Injection Reactor standard in all markets, 140 hp (100 kW) engine reintroduced as a regular production option, optional All Weather Air Conditioning discontinued, multiplex stereo option discontinued; fuel vapour return line and Ignition Key Warning buzzer new standard features. Front shoulder harnesses become standard after Jan 1, 1968, rear shoulder harnesses are optional all models. Side marker lights (clear in front with amber bulbs, red in rear) added to fenders on all models. New padding around central section of dash; thicker padding on top of dash, steering wheel spokes on Monzas now brushed aluminum (instead of chrome).

1969 6,000 US$2,528–2,641 Last year—production through May 1969; 521 Monza Convertibles of 6000 Corvairs produced; minor changes; improved clutch cable design on manual transmission cars, wider bucket seats with new head restraints, wider interior mirror, refined front brake hose design, Front side markers now feature amber lenses and clear bulbs (opposite from '68). 140 hp (100 kW) engine, F41 'special purpose suspension', N44 'quick ratio steering box' Positraction and telescopic steering column remain available. Interior window handles featured clear-colored knobs. Deluxe steering wheel option discontinued. New style ignition, door and trunk keys introduced. The last few months of production cars were hand-built on a special off-line area of the Willow Run plant.

Total 1,835,170

Corvair Production (Model years)

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It is amazing to me how people are still taken in by Ralph Nader's bullshit. I seem to be the only person who has actually read his book.

I read it and the various amounts of BS published about the Corvair. He left me totally unimpressed by his ranting nut it seems many believed him. It seemed to me it was picked on because it was different, that's all.

Al

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I miss my factory camper Greenbrier van (or was it a Greenbriar) ?

Green and white with cushions that made into a complete bed

behind the driver bench ....

Best handling van - would go anywhere

Saw the same model on an episode of ' Crime Story ',

the Las Vegas based TV Series .....

Shoulda' never sold it ..... :cool:

Jim

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