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The biggest quirk is its uniqueness and "only Aurora parts" in many cases. Due to the way the body is "shrunk-fit" around the engine, the under hood is not a very friendly place to work, for some things.

The shortness of the deck lid can make putting things in the luggage compartment tricky and shape/size sensitive.

Make SURE of where it's been in its earlier life. As flaky as a CarFax might be, it might be a good thing to do, with all due respect.

Several years ago, we sold a 2nd gen Aurora on the used car lot. It came back a few weeks later with a long list of customer concerns. One was that some of the warning lights would not go off. We did everything we could think of to get these things fixed correctly (some had been "rigged"), but the one thing that was onerous was the overheating, even after we got the radiator done. THEN, in the course of re-checking things after the radiator didn't fix the heat issue, our tech took more of the front shrouding of the upper radiator off and found a completely plugged up with debris a/c condenser. Looked like it had been underwater and all sorts of grass clippings and such were "mudded" into the condenser . . . yet the car looked very nice otherwise. Once the condenser was cleaned out, end of problem. The condenser on those cars is pretty much hidden, so looking at it might be advised.

You might notice some clunking in the steering column, but feel no looseness of sorts. Many GM cars had a slip-yoke intermediate shaft in the steering column under the hood. GM put out a bulletin about re-lubing them rather than replacing them, but it was a guess as to if that'd make things completely quiet. A normal situation that's more of an aggravation than a problem area.

I bought a 2000 Impala a year ago that had the clunking in it. I knew it was a normal situation and didn't worry about it. A few weeks ago, I had to replace the outer tie rod ends and that took care of the majority of the steering system noise. Seems that GM and others used some rubber isolation in them which can deteriorate with time and age. They'll be noticed like a worn idler arm used to be, when changing lanes and such, probably.

The NorthStar V-8 is very reliable, although it's got the starter under the intake manifold. It "sounds" worse than it is to replace, though.

There can be an oil leak near the oil pan rail, but up a few inches. This is where the main bearing saddle mates to the basic cylinder block. Have to drop the cradle, remove the engine, and then take the bottom half of the engine apart to replace the thin seals. As a result of the labor needed to get to the leak, it's an expensive repair. I think that cleaning it wiht some brake cleaner and then daubing some sealer on the outside of the mating surface might be a "band aid" fix that might work for a good while. More of a nuisance than anything else.

There might be some soft trim issues on the lower driver's seat cushion. Leather can be expensive to replace, but if a good trim shop does it it'll be fine . . . just that it'll look new compared to the other panels, possibly.

The car is a neat car to drive. Seating position is good, but rearward visibility can be an issue until you get used to using the mirrors and get them set TO use them all the time. The 4.0L V-8 still knows what "Rocket Oldsmobile" is about too! Ride and handling are generally good, too, with a good set of radials on it.

Other than that, just the normal stuff to look at and be aware of. It'll probably show a little wear, but still be a nice car to have, I suspect.

Keep us posted on what you find.

NTX5467

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The biggest quirk is its uniqueness and "only Aurora parts" in many cases. Due to the way the body is "shrunk-fit" around the engine, the under hood is not a very friendly place to work, for some things.

The shortness of the deck lid can make putting things in the luggage compartment tricky and shape/size sensitive.

Make SURE of where it's been in its earlier life. As flaky as a CarFax might be, it might be a good thing to do, with all due respect.

Several years ago, we sold a 2nd gen Aurora on the used car lot. It came back a few weeks later with a long list of customer concerns. One was that some of the warning lights would not go off. We did everything we could think of to get these things fixed correctly (some had been "rigged"), but the one thing that was onerous was the overheating, even after we got the radiator done. THEN, in the course of re-checking things after the radiator didn't fix the heat issue, our tech took more of the front shrouding of the upper radiator off and found a completely plugged up with debris a/c condenser. Looked like it had been underwater and all sorts of grass clippings and such were "mudded" into the condenser . . . yet the car looked very nice otherwise. Once the condenser was cleaned out, end of problem. The condenser on those cars is pretty much hidden, so looking at it might be advised.

You might notice some clunking in the steering column, but feel no looseness of sorts. Many GM cars had a slip-yoke intermediate shaft in the steering column under the hood. GM put out a bulletin about re-lubing them rather than replacing them, but it was a guess as to if that'd make things completely quiet. A normal situation that's more of an aggravation than a problem area.

I bought a 2000 Impala a year ago that had the clunking in it. I knew it was a normal situation and didn't worry about it. A few weeks ago, I had to replace the outer tie rod ends and that took care of the majority of the steering system noise. Seems that GM and others used some rubber isolation in them which can deteriorate with time and age. They'll be noticed like a worn idler arm used to be, when changing lanes and such, probably.

The NorthStar V-8 is very reliable, although it's got the starter under the intake manifold. It "sounds" worse than it is to replace, though.

There can be an oil leak near the oil pan rail, but up a few inches. This is where the main bearing saddle mates to the basic cylinder block. Have to drop the cradle, remove the engine, and then take the bottom half of the engine apart to replace the thin seals. As a result of the labor needed to get to the leak, it's an expensive repair. I think that cleaning it wiht some brake cleaner and then daubing some sealer on the outside of the mating surface might be a "band aid" fix that might work for a good while. More of a nuisance than anything else.

There might be some soft trim issues on the lower driver's seat cushion. Leather can be expensive to replace, but if a good trim shop does it it'll be fine . . . just that it'll look new compared to the other panels, possibly.

The car is a neat car to drive. Seating position is good, but rearward visibility can be an issue until you get used to using the mirrors and get them set TO use them all the time. The 4.0L V-8 still knows what "Rocket Oldsmobile" is about too! Ride and handling are generally good, too, with a good set of radials on it.

Other than that, just the normal stuff to look at and be aware of. It'll probably show a little wear, but still be a nice car to have, I suspect.

Great stuff! They are interesting cars - do you think they have more similarity to Cadillacs of the same age (engine) or Rivieras (platform partner) ?

Best of luck to the OP.

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We had a second generation Aurora for a number of years, bought it new, and it was a great car. Interestingly enough, it did develop the "clunk" in the steering mentioned, one reason my wife wanted to get rid of it, as the dealer just said it was normal.

We traded it in, and as we were doing the deal, the dealership had a local used car salesman come over, they were going to wholesale it to him. I actually knew this particular fellow quite well, and went over to talk to him, a situation that gave the new car dealership unease, as they kept trying to interupt us..........

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I found one ( 2nd Gen car ) in our "bid lot" for wholesalers before I bought the Impala. It was silver and about 100K miles. I ran a CarFax on it and found the (seemingly) complete service history of it since it got to its second and last owner. About once a year, she'd take it to the Cadillac dealer she bought it from (a used "program" car, I believe) to get an oil change. There were several "Check steering" repair order lines, all with "No problem found". Only thing that could have been was "the clunk".

It was a nice car. A little "slide in and out" wear on the driver's seat. Had the 3.5L "ShortStar" V-6 that was also in the Intrigues. It was Oldsmobile's answer to the Chrysler 300M, I suspect.

The platform is shared with Riviera, but each has their own unique chassis tuning (sway bars, springs, etc.). I do recall looking about the Park Avenues and DeVilles one time, to find that they had the same part number subframe, but obviously with different mounts for their V-6 and NorthStar V-8 engines, respectively. Although the Aurora 4.0L NorthStar is of the same engine family, the larger DeVille engine never was used in the Auroras.

There was one year of the 2nd Gen Aurora, with the 4.0L V-8, that paced the Indy 500. One of them is in the Indy 500 museum (or was for a few years). That was when the 4.0L "Olds" NorthStar was the basis of the Olds-engined Indy racers back then. Seems like that back then, in that particular race series, the engines used were either the Lexus V-8 or the Olds NorthStar V-8 . . . the Olds usually won.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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