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MarkV

Soon to be Collectable Front Wheel Drive Vehicles

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I get tired reading about what I'm suppost to collect based on what was a new car when I was a kid. I saw my first MERCER Raceabout in 1961 when I was ten years old, and I still want one today. :)

I know the feeling. If the Stoddard-Dayton roadster remains I had only had a motor and transmission it would still be in my stable. :cool: Dandy Dave!

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I get tired reading about what I'm supposed to collect based on what was a new car when I was a kid. I saw my first MERCER Raceabout in 1961 when I was ten years old, and I still want one today.

You misunderstand me. I said tend to collect, based on a lot of observation. There are many cars that are significantly older than me that I'd love to own. Realistically, I tend to find that my tastes in the older cars significantly outrun some combination of my pocketbook, expertise, and garage space.

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I believe the very title of this thread takes one away from the discussion of what should be considered an "antique" vehicle.

The question is, what more modern cars might become collectible?

Regardless of what kind of car you like, or when you think the "last good car" was made, asking what people might collect a few years down the road is a good question. Someone, right now, has two 1987 Chevy Astro vans sitting in their yard or garage, and are thinking this is the start of a great collection. Someone...collects... everything... and...anything. I've heard of toilet seat collectors, for goodness sakes, not that I'm comparing a van to a toilet seat, just making an observation.

I've always felt that the definition of antique, as it applies to automobiles, gets muddied quickly. The very feel of the word "antique" doesn't fit, to me, a 1980's car. The 1980's car might be old and collectible to some, but it's not really antique in the true sense of the word (aside from the AACA definition or classification).

Furniture is antique when it's 100 or more years old, and even then, some people stop that definition at pre-1901, or the end of the 19th century.

Yes, someday, there'll be a Prius at an AACA show, in the new Hybrid original classification (HHPOF??). And there'll be this same discussion......

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I think the 1986 Taurus is a good collectable car. It was a radical change in car design for the US, and set the pace for the next decade or so in car design.

My 1997 Taurus LX is my future antique collectable!

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Those who predict the future are usually found to have been embarrassingly wrong. Would the old standby "little deuce coupe" still be as popular without the Beach Boys and American Graffiti? How much of the "coolness" of the tri-5 Chevies is due to Hollywood? Did muscle cars develop in response to street and strip racing or was it the other way round? Not even the Shadow knows....

I've been saying for years that the hobby is or has been heavily driven by memories of ones youth and the automobile being a significant part of social interaction. I think the real question regarding front wheel drive vehicles and/or any of the vehicles made since the late 1970s is whether a sufficient number of the youth of that period have any real connection to any car. We simply haven't had the same circumstances since sometime in the 1970s that joined much of the public at the hip with automobiles. The Romance and emotional involvement with people and cars of earlier times is long gone! Sure there are some who will pickup the hobby when we old coots of the '40s, '50s and '60s era leave this planet, but it will be from desiring to capture some since of times past as depicted in motion pictures and old TV shows. To illustrate: When was the last time you knew of a new car showing up in the neighborhood causing a stir as it once would have? Just doesn't happen anymore, does it? But then we once knew everyone who lived in the neighborhood, bet few here know by name who may live five houses down the street.

Before I forget, Detroit chose to get into the horsepower race thanks to the popularity of hot rodding and track racing of all types and a desired to capitalize on that market. God knows for sure the typical family of the so called muscle car era needed a 400+ cubic inch, 300+ horsepower car like they needed a new hole in the head but guys like Harley Earl, John DeLorian, Bob Lutz, and Lee Iacocca understood the public wanted to identify with the roar of a powerful engine even if they were a wimpy pencil pusher that would be doing good to find where to fill the gas tank. Obviously, they were right.

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I get tired reading about what I'm suppost to collect based on what was a new car when I was a kid. I saw my first MERCER Raceabout in 1961 when I was ten years old, and I still want one today. :)

I re-read all of the previous posts and I did not see one line in there that said "you have have to collect any car based on somebody elses idea of what is collectable". everybodys idea is different, so collect what you want. I believe the question was "what FWD cars do anyone think will be collectable?". Let's stick to that question.

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No one and I mean no one can predict what will be deemed collectible 20 years from now.
We simply haven't had the same circumstances since sometime in the 1970s that joined much of the public at the hip with automobiles. The Romance and emotional involvement with people and cars of earlier times is long gone!

I disagree with these statements. I grew up in the 1970s, and even then people had a good idea what was "gong to be collectible", and it was frequently expressed in how they spent their money. The guy who had a 1968 Rambler generally did not spend as much on it as the guy who owned a 1968 Mustang, and the aftermarket catalogs of that day reflect that. Have you ever tried to compare the aftermarket accessories available for 2011 Camaros vs. 2011 Malibus?

That's one predictor right there. Here's another:

In my neighborhood there was a '56 Nomad that someone totally restored (true "frame off") to stock perfection when it was 18 years old. In 1979 there was a '71 GTO Judge convertible preserved like it was the original Declaration of Independence, whose owner would gleefully tell anyone that they only made 17 of them. Another guy (who drove GTOs daily) was saving 2 or 3 Continental Mark IIs for their collector value. My best friend bought and restored a '70 Challenger R/T as an investment when it was 8 years old, and made money doing so just 3 years later!

They were not always right, and some people did not see a monetary return for their efforts. The Continental Mark IIs for one didn't live up to their monetary promise as a collectible IMHO. However for the most part those cars were correctly seen as investments long before the time came when they were truly "collectible*". How was it possible to predict that...?

IMHO...relative resale values.

1957 Chevy coupes and convertibles were always 2x-3x the the price of Plymouth or Ford competitors in the used car market at that time. Ditto for Mustangs vs. (early) Barracudas, or 2 seat Thunderbirds vs. 4 seat T-birds, or dozens of other similar comparisons (outside of a brief period during the 2 gas crises, and then only for big block muscle cars). People just wanted them more when buying used cars, and they were willing to pay a premium to get them.

The same conditions exist today. Have you tried pricing a Miata vs. a 1998 Mercury Capri? How about a Subaru WRX vs. a 1999 Dodge Neon SRT? 2002-2005 Thunderbirds can already be worth more than their original sticker price (in perfect condition with low miles), much like 1955 Thunderbirds frequently were at that age. Can any Taurus say that? Any similar condition 1990s Dodge Viper is still worth more than 1/2 it's original MSRP. Try that with a Dodge Spriit or Stealth.

...And if that doesn't speak of a real "romance" for certain specific cars made of late, I'll eat my hat!:)

====================================

*However that line of "collectibility" can be very fuzzy with respedt to age. For instance the third issue of Hemmings Special Interest Autos had a cover story on the 1963/1964 Studebaker Avanti, when it wasn't even 10 years old yet! Obviously they (being among the most perceptive car buffs around) knew what was in store for those cars. Perhaps a better word here would have been "antique", but I kept to the meaning in the thread.

Edited by Dave@Moon (see edit history)

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Was looking at a new issue of Hemmings Classic Car and the new 25 year old cars! What FWD vehicles do you think will be worth picking up?

___________________________________________________________

Lets read the original thread and what it refers to. Collectible front wheel drive from the new Issue of Hemmings Classic car and the new 25 year old cars. Can we now comment on the 1987 model year FWD cars in the magazine and if they are collectible.

D.

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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There is at least one forum regular here who has taken pains to accurately restore his '80 VW Rabbit, and has been showing it in AACA National Meets over the past several years, to where I believe he is now AACA Grand National status, and possibly beyond...

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Things just aren't the same. Any established comp. is all thats producing nowadays. It sucks there can't/won't be a 'tucker' situation ever again. Or a Pinto even from an established comp. Gov safety standards are now the driver it seems.

I like the VW...the Rabbits, Cabrio's, Trucks...and Toyota has got a few old Corollas and Celicas...tho they stuck to rwd for the hotties like the Supra. Those cars are already going up in retail resale value. Honda has a few choice vehicles...old vin accords for instance.

I think what happened is a lot of the old car collectors look as these guys with the eye of 'get that thing out of here'. So most of the lovers of these vehicles have started their own underground clubs. These are the people that do the same thing as all lovers of sport cars...go out to dead highways at night, leave a coffee can at the next exit and put it down! It's fun(might've done it)and those folks have the same love for those cars as you do for yours.

The era of big old cars started going down when gas started coming up. Bottom line.

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Best way to answer the original question is to look at ebay or Craig's list to see just how many of those eighty whatever front wheel drive vehicles are still around. While I can't imagine a cruise night gathering being full of those things I would seriously question if there are enough survivors to fill a good size parking lot. Cash for Clunkers soaked up a bunch of them...Thankfully!

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Guest my3buicks

Nice attitude as always Jim with your "Thankfully" - some of these cars mean as much to their owners as any of your cars do to you. If you look over your list of cars many of them would have been the ones targeted if "Cash for Clunkers" happened at a different time in history.

There are some very worth FWD vehicles to be considered as future collectibles.

Edited by my3buicks (see edit history)

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Guest my3buicks

I will stick with Buick, some have been already mentioned

Reatta

Riviera (T Type & upper end ones)

Regal GS's

Electra T Type

LeSabre T Type

Century GS

These are all cars that I think down the road, and even today have some followings, and certainly good atrributes - they can make excellent driving cars, and have a great blend of performance and comfort.

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Whether we "olders" like it or not, there will be some folks who want what we wouldn't consider. I really do not like front wheel drive, but happen to have one of the early "starters" of the current packaging fad-a 1963 Mini. They made these little cars till 99 or so, and some of the prices for them are considerably more than list. I only have our little car because it is a street-legal go cart, but would love to have an engine in it that had a driveshaft going where it's "supposed" to go. Ha !! I agree with "my3buicks", there is and will be some of the fwd's that will be sought after, John

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collectable?? i would guess any convertible or two door or sports car would be first choice. and as far as "they don't build them like they used to" is so true... anything built now is better than they were back then... 100,000 miles now is no sweat. they just don't have the style of the old ones.

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Though there are many interesting newer cars out there, For me, anything built after 1965 just doesn't spin my crank. I'd sooner have a 49 DeSoto or a Stude Champion or a Kaiser than a FWD puckey bucket from the 80s. Yuck! I've owned plenty of them, wore 'em out and sent 'em packing. The only ones that I would like to have again were the Honda 600s. Poor mans Mini.

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The real question is what constitutes a "collectible" or "classic" car? Being old does not make it collectible or a classic. Is a 1978 Chevy Chevette a collectible classic? I suspect not. But I guess the Chevette has it's 'fan'.

2002 Lincoln Continental will be a collectible car in the near future.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)

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Guest my3buicks

Actually there are a couple superbly nice early Chevettes that run the AACA National show circuit, and I am sure their owners feel they are collectible and worth preserving or they would have driven them into the ground. It is the same regardless what you collect - One Mans junk Is Another Mans Treasure.

Collectible does not necessarily spell valuable - and again what is collectible to one person, another person may have no interest in it at all.

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Actually there are a couple superbly nice early Chevettes that run the AACA National show circuit, and I am sure their owners feel they are collectible and worth preserving or they would have driven them into the ground. It is the same regardless what you collect - One Mans junk Is Another Mans Treasure.

Collectible does not necessarily spell valuable - and again what is collectible to one person, another person may have no interest in it at all.

That's my point in the previous post, what constitues a collectible or classic car? I sure the Chevette owners love their cars. For me the Chevette was a 4 speed I learned to drive when I was 16. I would not consider it collectible though. But yes, one's man junk is another treasure. :)

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I typed out a long response, then realized that none of the cars I referenced were FWD cars from the late '80s. :)

That being said, I have many fond memories of my youth in compact import cars from before the tuner years. Not sought after for speed/handling by the tuner crowd, but I would take any car from my youth as an additional car just based off of the sentimental value. I think this will be the trend for years to come. Even if that car was a Ford Escort or Chevy Cavalier...someone has fond memories that will bring excellent examples of these cars into the limelight once again. They may never be popular enough to generate a stack of catalogs for replacement parts, but there are plenty of '50s and '60s cars that still need those catalogs created before we get to a 1990's Cavalier catalog. :)

Now, moving into the tuner cars, my 70 year old mother has a 38,000 mile 1992 Acura Integra that is just a good detail and new floor mats away from being a contender in any local car show. And a stylish car at that! Driven by a little old lady to the grocery store on Sundays....

Edited by bhclark (see edit history)

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We have already established that any car over 25 is a antique, and it has been proven that people collect cars that 50 to over 70 years ago people would never say was collectible. Think about it, would someone in the mid 30's to mid forties think a model T was going to be collectible? -only the person who has a attachment to it. In my generation we trashed Woody wagons because they were a cheap way to carry us and our surfboards to the beach, and after we beat them up we pushed them over cliffs and blew them up or crashed them into each other and the same thing happened to VW beetles about ten years later and now the big rage 21 window VW buses...we just trashed them, With the exception of the woody you could trash them and they would take it over and over. In 1966 if you would tell me a 1962 21 window bus would go for 182,000.00 at a auction I would tell you your off your head- even if you asked me that question in 1982.

The only problem I see for the future will be parts, peoples enthusiasm for the automobile, fuel and the government letting us have them-and all our old cars. If all those things turn out to be a yes people will be collecting ( they already are ) 1987 anythings.

D

Edited by helfen (see edit history)

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We have already established that any car over 25 is a antique, and it has been proven that people collect cars that 50 to over 70 years ago people would never say was collectible. Think about it, would someone in the mid 30's to mid forties think a model T was going to be collectible? -only the person who has a attachment to it. In my generation we trashed Woody wagons because they were a cheap way to carry us and our surfboards to the beach, and after we beat them up we pushed them over cliffs and blew them up or crashed them into each other and the same thing happened to VW beetles about ten years later and now the big rage 21 window VW buses...we just trashed them, With the exception of the woody you could trash them and they would take it over and over. In 1966 if you would tell me a 1962 21 window bus would go for 182,000.00 at a auction I would tell you your off your head- even if you asked me that question in 1882.

The only problem I see for the future will be parts, peoples enthusiasm for the automobile, fuel and the government letting us have them-and all our old cars. If all those things turn out to be a yes people will be collecting ( they already are ) 1987 anythings.

D

Accurately and well said!

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Possibly one criteria for "future collectible" might be a vehicle which dealers generally added "availability charges" to when sold new? AND for which the manufacturer didn't edge the price up the next year because they could? Past that, the "oddball stuff", like '50s Buicks with manual transmissions, with all due respect? Then the "sentimental attachment stuff", like the car you came home from the hospital in or . . . first date, first race, honeymoon (first or whatever) . . . LOTS of possibilities in this area--fwd or not!!!

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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We have already established that any car over 25 is a antique, and it has been proven that people collect cars that 50 to over 70 years ago people would never say was collectible. Think about it, would someone in the mid 30's to mid forties think a model T was going to be collectible? -only the person who has a attachment to it. In my generation we trashed Woody wagons because they were a cheap way to carry us and our surfboards to the beach, and after we beat them up we pushed them over cliffs and blew them up or crashed them into each other and the same thing happened to VW beetles about ten years later and now the big rage 21 window VW buses...we just trashed them, With the exception of the woody you could trash them and they would take it over and over. In 1966 if you would tell me a 1962 21 window bus would go for 182,000.00 at a auction I would tell you your off your head- even if you asked me that question in 1882.

The only problem I see for the future will be parts, peoples enthusiasm for the automobile, fuel and the government letting us have them-and all our old cars. If all those things turn out to be a yes people will be collecting ( they already are ) 1987 anythings.

D

Well thought out but I'm not buying a Chevette! :)

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Well thought out but I'm not buying a Chevette! :)

There is someone out there who bought one, perhaps their very first car that has that attachment.

I'm just lucky I still have two of the three cars I had in high school.

D.

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