Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi, does anyone know the difference between a 1939 Studebaker President brake drum, and a 1940 Studebaker President brake drum? They have different part numbers, but I was wondering if a 1940 drum could be made to fit a 1939?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does seem strange that the brake shoe set 192671 is listed for 4C-6C (1938-40) while the drums for 5C (1939) are 191692 and 6C-8C (1940-42) are 198039. If the shoes are the same for 1939 and 1940, how different can the drums be?

I also wonder how different the President 198039 drums are from the 198038 drums for 1940-42 Commanders. This is the same part number that fits all Studebaker 1/2-ton trucks 1941-64, so these aren't too hard to find. Anyone want to pay the Museum to pull the drawings for the three drums and compare them?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My understanding is the President brake shoes are wider than the Commander shoes to provide greater braking service. The parts catalog notes to use up existing stock of linings for 7A to !0A and 11 A and 12A and then substitute part # 676582 linings for all these commander models. It doesn't mention this for the President linings. Could someone measure the width of a president drum vs a commander. If the two Presidents have the same diameter drums and axle spindle size they will probably interchange. Could just be a design upgrade. Studebaker made quite a few changes in the front suspension between 1939 and 1940.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, thanks for the replies. Which museum, and I'll contact them for drawings? The front and rear hubs on 2?C to 8C don't change either, and the backing plates on the 39 and 40 pres are the same (from memory) along with the shoes so I guess the changes in the drums must be minimal? I've heard a 4e or 5e champ ute drums fit but can't be sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The person to contact is archivist Andy Beckman at the Studebaker National Museum. He is the official keeper of the 70 tons of original factory drawings held by the museum. For a relatively small fee, one of the museum volunteers will search the files for the drawings you want and make paper copies in actual size. Many parts are drawn 1:1. The museum takes credit cards for payment and mails the drawings. They will not provide electronic files, e.g. PDF, in order to limit re-distribution. The income from this service goes to good use at the museum. I have been able to get drawings for parts from the 1920's, don't know how far back they really go.

Andy Beckman's email address is abeckman at studebakermuseum dot org. Just give him the part numbers and part names and they will take care of it. Be sure to say what your goal is because they use their experience to suggest related parts.

Edited by Gary_Ash (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Took some photos of the rear drum that is on the car- hopefully they are attached. I can't be sure this is an original, but suppose it is. The drum machining on the inside was 66.3mm wide. Let me know if you need any more dimensions. Regards James.

post-75720-143138879243_thumb.jpg

post-75720-143138879246_thumb.jpg

post-75720-143138879248_thumb.jpg

post-75720-14313887925_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have contacted the museum, they are going to look. In the meantime, I sketched up the attached diagram showing main dimensions (hopefully it attached). It looks like it might just be an increased offset on a 1940 drum (in the stamped sheet metal part). So might be able to part off the sheet metal half an inch from the cast, and weld in a 39 hub and sheet metal. Have figured out a way to keep alignment but would be much easier to find a nos drum! Thanks for your comments. James

post-75720-143138889741_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...