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About a fuel filter


Guest bofusmosby

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Guest bofusmosby

I just removed my fuel pump to send it off to be re-built, and when I emptied all the gas out of the bowl, I noticed a lot of crap and red stuff that came out with it. The red stuff looked like flakes or something to that effect. When I get the fuel pump back, I am wanting to install a fuel filter to catch any more crud that happens to break free. It would be very difficult to install this filter before the fuel pump, so I was thinking of installing it between the pump and the carb. My problem is, this is a solid metal fuel line, so I am wondering if I just cut the line or what? Also, will I use a small rubber fuel hose to join the filter to the metal line?

Any advice would really be appreciated.

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Guest Foggy norm

The small rubber hose...how do you intend to attach it, clamp or doe's it have compression end's. Clamp's work fine on small engine and vacuum hose's. Is it an auto filter, if so, it should have compression fitting's. Metal line's can be double flared, same as brake line's. I would avoid the rubber hose because of the vibration,my opinion. Flare kit's are handy, be sure it's a DOUBLE flare kit. Be sure to place the fitting on the line before you flare it. The line shouldn't be difficult to remove, cut a section the size of the new opening (width of filter), flare the end's, after installing the appropriate fitting's, reinstall, working from the pump. Remember these part are usually potmetal (softer than the fitting's), use commn sense when applying torque.

avoid placing new filter in a HOT zone

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Guest bofusmosby

Thank you Foggy Norm for your reply. This is for my 37 Pontiac, and yes, the fuel line is easy to get to, and of course, the line is already disconnected from the fuel pump. If I am to buy a "flair kit", do I have to take the fuel line with me to get the correct size, or is it pretty much universal? Also, (remember my ignorance) Is there a special fuel filter to get that accepts this flair'd end and the nuts? I just need to know what to look for or to ask.

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If you don't want to buy the flare kit, I've used compression fittings on metal auto gas lines. It has a brass ring that slides up over the line and the brass fittings that come with it have recesses that the ring fits into. As you tighten the fittings, the ring is "compressed" into the fitting and onto the line, providing a seal.

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Guest Jim_Edwards
I just removed my fuel pump to send it off to be re-built, and when I emptied all the gas out of the bowl, I noticed a lot of crap and red stuff that came out with it. The red stuff looked like flakes or something to that effect. When I get the fuel pump back, I am wanting to install a fuel filter to catch any more crud that happens to break free. It would be very difficult to install this filter before the fuel pump, so I was thinking of installing it between the pump and the carb. My problem is, this is a solid metal fuel line, so I am wondering if I just cut the line or what? Also, will I use a small rubber fuel hose to join the filter to the metal line?

Any advice would really be appreciated.

The "red flakes" you speak of can be two things and both are resultant from exposure to the MTBE and Ethanol in gasoline. Paper element fuel filters apparently consist of multiple layers glued or fused together and with sufficient contact with oxygenated gasoline they begin to decompose. Unfortunately your carburetor is also collecting that decomposed material. The best plan is to place a micro-screen type fuel filter in the scheme of things and leave the paper element filter out. I have written WIX about the paper filter element issue and after several weeks having past I have not heard a peep out of them. I suspect they haven't answered because they have no solution and are not really worried about their business being severely impacted if everyone stopped buying that type of fuel filter.

FYI the second factor in those flakes is garbage being removed from the fuel tank and/or common welded steel rigid fuel line. Ethanol is a solvent with very aggressive tendencies with several metals including steel. Ethanol will eventually loosen and dislodge every bit of rust in the tank and steel line.

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Guest Foggy norm

Double flare "kit's" are universal, fit's brakelines to the fat fuel line's. Sold in auto store's, price's vary, work's on copper or steel line. Copper is easier but not recomended, tend's to crack from vibration over time. Pick up a vintage in-line fuel filter on eBay, the one's with the glass bowl. You may have to make a new gasket for it ,cork rubber, does a buddy have a spare peice. These usually have ceramic filter or screen (cleanable), check when purchasing. The glas bowl is held on with a wire bail and screw tightner, some time's the screw get's stripped (got a tackwelder). These filter's have the same fitting's as the carb and fuel pump. Your aware old part's need new care, trying to give you a heads-up about potential need's, sound's like a lot of work...it's not.

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Guest bofusmosby

Thank you guys for your answers. One of my concerns (speaking of the gas tank) is that the previous owner had cleaned and "treated" the tank with a epoxy coating years before the car became mine. I am concerned that maybe the epoxy could be breaking down, and that these red flakes are a result of that. Either way, I know that I must install a filter in the fuel line to prevent major problems in the future. I hadn't thought about getting one of the old type filters on Ebay, but that's a great idea. I'll look into that tonight. I'd like to get all this taken care of before the re-built fuel pump arrives.

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My problem is, this is a solid metal fuel line, so I am wondering if I just cut the line or what? Also, will I use a small rubber fuel hose to join the filter to the metal line?

Any advice would really be appreciated.

No need for flaring as the fuel pump only puts out 3-5 psi.

Yes, just remove and cut the line where you want the filter. Take a few inches out to allow for the length of the new filter. Go to Napa (the counter guy will know what you need) and get an in line fuel filter with the same diameter fittings as your fuel line (usually 5/16" or 3/8"). Get the one that comes with two short rubber hoses and clamps. These can be had in either metal or plastic. They're cheap and easily replaced in the future. If you can only find one without the hoses you can buy fuel hose separately of the correct diameter but make sure it's for fuel and not just plain rubber hose.

impala

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Guest bofusmosby

I spoke to a local agarge, and the owner said that compression fittings would work well for what I needed. I guess before I do anything, I need to get the diameter of the metal fuel line. Does NAPA sell compression fittings for this? I'd rather do this myself, instead of paying someone to do this. Got to save money when I can.

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You can of course do that but it's not necessary. This is all you need:

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The example has 1/4" inlet and outlet but it also comes in 5/16" or 3/8" depending on your fuel line size. Slip on and clamped rubber hose is perfectly acceptable for early cars with a mechanical fuel pump. You just don't want to use this setup with newer cars that have high pressure systems.

impala

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