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2012 Market Value of 1991 Reatta Convertible


HRP

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I'd appreciate some information for our taxes. What would be an acceptable market value for a 1991 red Buick Reatta convertible with a new tan canvass top. The car has minimal wear, 106k miles, has always been garaged, and has all original equipment. The cd and tape player do not work. the radio does. Has been regularily serviced every 3k miles.

Thanks,

Dick

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I'd appreciate some information for our taxes. What would be an acceptable market value for a 1991 red Buick Reatta convertible with a new tan canvass top. The car has minimal wear, 106k miles, has always been garaged, and has all original equipment. The cd and tape player do not work. the radio does. Has been regularily serviced every 3k miles.

Thanks,

Dick

THAT is a loaded question. Assuming it is your car, I might start with asking your insurance agent (what's your coverage).

I am more curious how your taxes and the car are related. I can only write off one car per business (that is of course if I use the car for business ;). You must have something else mind.

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It is my car, and I'm not planning to sell it. I'm retired. My wife wants the current fair market value as a part of her tracking our net worth. I've managed to find reasonable values for our 2001 Honda CR-V SE and our 2002 Lexus LS430. She wants the values of my 1991 Buick Reatta Convertible and my 1977 Excalibur Roadster. She usually does this about every 2-3 years while doing our taxes. No tax implications.

Thanks,

Dick

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Take a look at NADA - New Car Prices, Used Car Values, New Car Reviews & Car Buying Guides - NADAguides.com Official Site . Put in the relevant info (i.e. zip code) and hope for the best. As for market value, there isn't much demand for our convertibles at the moment. Look at comps on Hemmings and AutoTrader (I think your mileage is a factor even though few '91s were produced), deduct 15-20% and you might have a reasonable number.

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I think the best you could hope to do is look at sources (auctions?) where the car can be determined to have sold, and what the selling price was, and aggregate these figures with NADA or similar sources. Cars of Particular Interest is another source to check, and maybe your insurance agent. Of course, with the latter, they will generally low-ball the value on a regular auto policy so they can pay less if there is ever a claim. Really, the number has to come from one's own research and is only as good as the sources considered.

Also, document everything - if you go by online sales, print a hard copy of the page showing the sale price and file it away, to support the stated [estimated] valuation. I've had to do this for insurance purposes on my homeowner's policy. I own a large a quantity of vintage stereo equipment, enough that I chose to carry special coverage for it's aggregate value. I had to document sales of identical make/model gear over time (from ebay, and other online sources mostly) and base the amount of coverage on a averaged sum of those figures. I also kept receipts from the purchase of my own gear to show what was paid.

It can be a lot of work to do this, but is the only way to convincingly determine replacement value if the house burns down and takes my toy collection with it. Even so, I'd expect a fight with the insurance company as collectibles of any sort are hard to put a firm tangible value on. They will still want to factor in depreciation. Eye of the beholder and all that kind of stuff.

Then too, the valuation to the owner of such a car as a Reatta convertible is generally (in one's own mind) based on what they would like to get for it if they decided to sell it. Right now, that is a tough one to peg. From my casual observation, 'verts are selling for decent money if one thinks of them as just a 20 year old car, albeit a unique one. That said, it seems only the really primo examples are getting top dollar, and those mostly from ads in Hemmings or at reputable auctions. The blisteringly expensive examples on Ebay are not selling (at least at asking price, they may get a best offer that is accepted - or not - or may sell offline for less after the fact) just based on the number of times you see the same cars re-listed.

There is a 91 red/tan on ebay right now that has been relisted at least 4 times now. It does not appear to be an A1 condition car, but it has had it's BIN reduced to $7500 on it's most recent relist, and is still sitting there waiting for a buyer. Unless there is some major problem with it (I have not looked that closely) it seems it should sell pretty easily at $7500.

I don't want to gore anyone's ox, but neither do I want to encourage valuations based on wishful thinking or pure fantasy. Ebay in particular tends to breed this kind of mentality, where everything is "rare", "one of a kind", or some other such descriptive modifier intended to justify a higher asking price. This is one place where the market still more or less works. Excepting the periodic uniformed/foolish buyer, if the price is too high, it's gonna sit there unsold for a long time.

KDirk

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Guest steveskyhawk

Convertibles don't sell well in February. In June the price/value will rise around 30%.

All kidding aside, Padgett got it right. Condition is everything. I have said before, and I will say it again now, I believe that prices will skyrocket in 2014. Nice convertibles will be selling for near MSRP. Coupes will take a couple extra years to catch up.

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Buick : Reatta Buick : Reatta | eBay

Check this out. It's been up for awhile only because reatta's arent a fast seller. I think it'll put it in a pretty good perspective. $7000 range seems about right unless it's show room quality. Also having a rare color combo adds to value. If I was looking for one or to sell one, me personally i'd value A driftwood, black or polo convertible higher than a red/tan or white model would.

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It's been up for awhile only because reatta's arent a fast seller.

I disagree. Put that car in Hemmings at that price, and it would be gone. eBay is not the place for that car.

my immaculate '90 White/Grey convertible (pretty rare color combo) with 47k miles, new top, tires, pinstripe, complete professional detail, among other things only got up to $7,400. People on eBay are not prepared to pay for nice cars.

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that is true, I wouldnt look to spend that much on ebay unless it was a SS model which we've seen one or 2 in the last year on ebay. But my point on color combo still stands. Red and tan is the most common color combo, hell the promo model was even red/tan lol

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that is true, I wouldnt look to spend that much on ebay unless it was a SS model which we've seen one or 2 in the last year on ebay. But my point on color combo still stands. Red and tan is the most common color combo, hell the promo model was even red/tan lol

Yes, however, color combo can go either way.

There are some people that are not a big fan of red/tan (like myself) simply because it's common.

On the flip side, like you said, the promo car as well as all the dealer literature depicted a Red/Tan Reatta. This is the color combo that sticks in the minds of those who couldn't afford the car back in the day, and now are looking for one.

When you say "Buick Reatta" to those people, the image that pops in their head is a Red/Tan car.

Thus, some people will pay top dollar to bing back those memories from the early '90s about that car they could never afford until now.

It all depends on the buyer. Who's on the other end of the cash.

But going back to the OP's subject, he's not looking to sell the car, just get an appraisal of what it is worth.

Like people have already said, condition is everything. If the car was lovingly cared for, and always treated with affection, then it probably is a beautiful car. I've seen cars that are over 200K that are still in very nice condition. Why? because they were taken care of.

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I don't think there is any argument that serious (read: well funded) buyers are not looking at ebay as a serious venue for car buying. I am surprised how many cars are listed there with high asking prices. Maybe they are listed elsewhere too (many listings state that they are advertised locally and subject to prior sale) but it is increasingly obvious that the real action is in Hemmings and other specialty forums/publications.

On the value of certain colors, I think the most expensive Reatta ever would be a Polo Green convertible. At least the first one to be found (if legitimate and not a repaint) would fetch top dollar assuming it was in otherwise great condition. I'd think long term the Select 60 will probably be the one that blows all others out of the water on price.

While color preference is subjective, I would tend to agree that red/tan will be less costly as they are so much more common. A whole lot of white/burgundy 'verts seem to be around too, and those were only offered in 1990.

While not a statement on value, setting aside my [obvious] preference for white cars, my other favorite color combinations for both coupes and convertibles would be (in no particular order):

Claret Red with Tan interior

Claret Red with Burgundy interior

Claret Red with Dark Grey interior

Polo Green with Tan interior

Gunmetal Grey with Burgundy interior

Silver with Burgundy interior

Silver with Red interior

Not much interested in black as an exterior color, it can look great, but is a real dog to keep looking top notch (swirl marks, anyone?) Just don't have the time for the constant detailing.

Generally not a fan of blue either, although I would make an exception for midnight blue with light neutral interior (never offered on the Reatta of course). With all due apologies to the Maui Blue fans here, I can't stand light blue cars (unless it is powder blue on something from the 50's like a T-Bird or a Bel-Air). Don't know why, I just never did like light blue paint jobs. Of course, I could say the same about brown (a very 70's and 80's color) and yellow (a overly trendy color that tries to come back every few years yet never quite goes away).

I think my aversion to blue is also partly because GM did so many cars with dark blue interiors for so long, I just got tired of looking at them. They must have gotten a heck of a deal on dark blue vinyl and carpet given how many cars came with that stuff.

KDirk

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Padgett-

Yes, the sapphire firemist is a pretty decent shade of blue (not quite as dark as I'd like, but acceptable) however the biggest problem there is all 3 that I have seen in person so far have had terrible paint jobs (original, but weather beaten/clear coat damage). So, I have not had the benefit of seeing one in proper condition to assess how it really looks.

My other issue is that nearly all of these were built with blue interiors. Just too much of one color. Admittedly, so is claret red over burgundy, but I clearly am more tolerant of burgundy than blue thus the double standard. I can't understand why more weren't built with a tan interior; I think that is a good combo with sapphire blue, yet only a handful of special orders were apparently made in that combo, along with a few having grey interiors based on anecdotes posted here in the past.

With that, I think I have said all I need to on the subject of color combos. Just my opinions, so no one need place much weight in them.

KDirk

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I always liked a deep (not olive) green with a saddle interior. If you ever get to Orlando, I'll show you what a triple blue should look like. BTW I have known several peoople who have trouble with red interiors but the foundling is white/white/red and so is the Judge, does not bother me.

Do agree that the 90 Select Sixty 'vert will eventually be the most valuable of all but the most valueable coupe will be the 88 (CRT and the most buttons) further, a future collector will put a premium on the Teves.

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Guest Squire Tom

i had no problem , other than the cost , of insuring my 91 red/tan coupe for $6000 stated value replacement in case of a total loss. i would probably sell it for $4000 with 114k in very good running condition and 85% cosmetic condition. it only needs a replace of the driver headlight motor ( intermittent non opening ) and power antenna (motor runs , mast doesn't ) , steering wheel fair and a lot of wear on swapped passenger seat, driver side carpeting worn badly , but covered with reatta mats.

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