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tincan

New Guy with a qestion about the Marion Bobcat

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I am not a car collector, but I do have a real appreciation for them.

The question that I have is that as a youngster I found an old what I think is a medalion from a watch fob or key ring.

On this medallion it says Marion motor cars and has a picture of a Marion Bobcat.

Can anybody tell me if there is any value to what I found or just an interesting piece of history?

Thanks in advance for your input.

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There was a car called a Marion Bobcat. If it is an original from 1909 it would be very rare. If it is a reproduction from the 50s or 60s not so much.

Photos will help to identify it.

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Std Cat shows Marion in Indianapolis 1904-1915 (later the Marion-Handley) and says, in part "A special straight 8 race car called the Comet was built in the Marion shops in 1904, and George Schebler used a Marion chassis to build a V12 roadster in 1908, but the best known sporting car from Marion was the Bobcat roadster of 1913, a rakish machine...".

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I have e-mailed the owner of a 1912 Marion Bobcat and told him of your question. I think the Bobcat is the speedster. The car on your fob is a touring car.

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Yes, It is definitely a watch Fob. And it is much more authentic than a Marion Bob Cat that I pieced together years ago for a customer that had a few old parts.

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Looks like around a 1912 Model 30. A bit of history, Harry Clayton Stutz of the Stutz automobile fame ... between 1906-1910 was Chief Engineer and Designer/Factory manager of Marion Motor Car Co.

Eric

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Marion roadster and a touring

It was in 1913 that Marion started calling the sporty open front body style the Bobcat. The roadster name moved to the same 2 passenger body but now it had doors.

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I have a pocket watch with the name "Studebaker" on the face of the watch. Apparently anyone could order a run of watches with any name they wanted on them. Does anybody have a clue as to who might have actually made the watch?

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There is a gentleman in the Studebaker Drivers Club who sells and repairs authentic Studebaker watches (yes, they did make them). He is in Dayton, Ohio. Send me a pm for his name and number.

Terry

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can you imagine an assembly line of gruff old Studebaker men on the line, presided over by a line foreman with a whip, pushin to make his watch quota for the day?

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The Marion Company was in business from 1904 through 1915 with the Bobcat being their most legendary and remembered model. It was reminiscent of the later Stutz Bearcat, and both cars shared the same designer, the legendary Harry C. Stutz. The Bobcat was produced from 1911 through 1913.

It seems the Bobcat was model 33 while the fob shows model 30. The model number may also indicate horsepower. It isn't the early 1907 style and not the late 1914 either (fob still shows side lanterns) so should fall in the middle.

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Studebaker watches were made by the South Bend Watch Company - I do not think they were made exclusively for the Studebaker company, but both plants were in the same area and I'd suspect a family tie-in was there if not financial backing. If you open the rear cover the works should be marked with both "South Bend Watch" and "Studebaker" as well as a serial number that can be traced to a year of manufacture somehow.

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Hi new guy. Advertising watch fobs like yours can be fairly valuable. They appeal to both antique car guys, and watch fob collectors. If you did want to sell it, I would suggest doing a bit of research on the Internet. Marion cars have unfortunately survived in mere hand-full numbers; there are probably several times the number of the watch fobs around, so I doubt a Marion owner would pay a large sum for your fob. It would probably appeal most to a specialized collector of automotive advertising memorabilia.

Greg in Canada

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Thanks for all of the input everybody. If I find any further info I will be sure to post what I find.

Thanks again

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