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Barry Wolk

Identify the car in this picture

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Has a kind of RR Silver Ghost "under running board box" look to it, but the front fenders are flatter.

post-37352-14313880849_thumb.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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It's a 1-cylinder Scrunch with Flat-O-Matic.

Too gone to really tell but one thing is for sure, has to be 1918 or earlier.

Being taken (or at least the photo is stored) in Toronto, Canada may make it a bit more difficult yet that trunk design sure caught my eye :)

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It's a 1-cylinder Scrunch with Flat-O-Matic.

Too gone to really tell but one thing is for sure, has to be 1918 or earlier.

Being taken (or at least the photo is stored) in Toronto, Canada may make it a bit more difficult yet that trunk design sure caught my eye :)

I think that the "trunk design" is actually the rear seat spread out.

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I think that the "trunk design" is actually the rear seat spread out.

Yup, that is why my smiley. :D

Wonder how it was thrown over unless this was a second run for the tank and this was a photo op shot?

Love those old WWI tanks.

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Maybe a car of German or Austrian make, since it is a British-made tank (Mark IV?) on Armistice Day (Nov. 11, 1918)? Trying to show that the Axis powers were truly and completely defeated?

Edited by 36chev (see edit history)

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Maybe a car of German or Austrian make, since it is a British-made tank (Mark IV?) on Armistice Day (Nov. 11, 1918)? Trying to show that the Axis powers were truly and completely defeated?

Excellent point!

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Sometimes it's hard to believe that, with all the knowledge on this forum, that there are cars that can't be identified.

It's a 1911 Gonnaflatten, with the rare "spreadaxle" option, to reduce wear on the bottom of the tires.

It also had the Springback option, and if the photo was availble right after this one, you'd see that it had Spring Backed to a normal touring car.

It's been a tough week, best I can do....

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Sometimes it's hard to believe that, with all the knowledge on this forum, that there are cars that can't be identified.

It's a 1911 Gonnaflatten, with the rare "spreadaxle" option, to reduce wear on the bottom of the tires.

It also had the Springback option, and if the photo was availble right after this one, you'd see that it had Spring Backed to a normal touring car.

It's been a tough week, best I can do....

:D

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You got to say one thing for this make of early car. It had some solid front suspension since after a tank driving over (can see by the door / center section the track had been there first) and now sitting on the car hasn't collapsed it!

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Assuming that the right front fender has not been bent up at the front, I would say that there is a good chance it might be a Stoddard-Dayton. One of the Stoddards unique styling designs was the upward curve of the front and rear fenders as seen here.

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T Head is absolutly right. BOth the upturn of the front fender and the storage area under the running boards spell Stoddard Dayton to me.

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Ouch! :eek: Yup, could even be a rare Stoddard Knight with the full aluminum running board tool boxes. At that time, just an old car that you could no longer get parts for. Dandy Dave!

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They had tanks in Canada to repell Ohioans ?

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Ouch! :eek: Yup, could even be a rare Stoddard Knight with the full aluminum running board tool boxes. At that time, just an old car that you could no longer get parts for. Dandy Dave!

Would make sense since they quit making them 5-years earlier and cars that were even 5 years old themselves in those days were considered scrap value.

But they were considered high quality cars which could account for the front suspension holding up so well under a tank attack.

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