Sign in to follow this  
X-Frame

X-Frame History - help

Recommended Posts

As suspected it is a Hudson frame... runs between 1937-1939. The 1937 had a different gas tank bracing but can't see the rear in this photo.

It also answers the oft-asked question of when Hudson first introduced its

swing-away steering wheel.

TG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
X-Frame, you may like this...

In mid-May, 1955, "The Great One" visited the B-O-P Plant in Linden, NJ,

for a tour and to pick up his new '55 Roadmaster Convertible. It was part

of the publicity for his new multi-million dollar deal with CBS surrounding

his new show, "The Honeymooners," as Buick had previously sponsored

Uncle Miltie's, "The Buick Berle Show" on NBC.

These pics came from the estate of Marshall Boden,

given to me by a kindly ebay vendor (they do exist)

for a favor rendered.

TG

They are really great pictures TG. Only problem is if I was to use one in the book I would need permission and of course credit given to the source :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As suspected it is a Hudson frame... runs between 1937-1939. The 1937 had a different gas tank bracing but can't see the rear in this photo.
Column shift. It's no earlier than 1939

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Column shift. It's no earlier than 1939

The style of frame in the picture was only made between 1937-1939. The 1940 had a different front design and the 1936 a different X brace design among other things.

Granted, I am not a transmission guy as my focus is on frames but did look at a 1939 Hudson Owner's Manual and it shows a manual shifter on the column. They also have had automatic transmissions since 1934 but the shifter doesn't look like the manual. So, if 1939 was the first year for "on the tree" shifters for Hudson and the frame in this configuration used between 1937-1939 then it must be a 1939 frame in the picture :)

Edited by X-Frame (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They are really great pictures TG. Only problem is if I was to use one in the book I would need permission and of course credit given to the source :D

I'm not so sure you'd need permission. They look like press-release photos, and your use would not be for advertising purposes. If they are not press-release photos, then you'd have to get permission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tip West... one never is quite sure about these things and rather play it on the safe side asking whenever I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I answered my own question about the 2002-2005 Thunderbirds. They share the Lincoln LS and Jaguar platform but yes, they have X bracing but a bolt-on type which also acts as a strut and not a true "frame". There are actually 3 of them positioned under the engine, under the body, and under the trunk area. Even owners are unaware of them but are supposed to ocassionally check to make sure the bolts don't come loose as it affects the ride of the car. Diecast models I have seen of these cars do not show the X bracing.

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The X frames used in the Kaiser's I thought were adapted by Dutch Darrin from his works with Duesenberg and Packard. Something to look into on the Frazer and Kaiser cars from 1949-1955

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The X frames used in the Kaiser's I thought were adapted by Dutch Darrin from his works with Duesenberg and Packard. Something to look into on the Frazer and Kaiser cars from 1949-1955

Will look into that tidbit, thanks. The Duesenberg never used a X braced frame but Packard did.

BTW... the 1946 Kaiser was originally planned to be a unibody front wheel drive car. And they did not use the X frame except between 1951-1955. They were ladder construction prior.

Edited by X-Frame (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this