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Quisp

"Ruby" my 62 Mercury Comet

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Hey All,

I just joined the forum and I'm excited to dive into my Mercury Comet project. Picked it up in November from my mother-in-law. My father-in-law passed away a short time ago and this was his restoration project. I was fortunate enough to be asked if i was interested in the car and I jumped on it. I've been thinking about getting a car to restore when my kids are done with college (one just finished and the other is a Junior) so the timing is about right. I'm hoping to make many friends here and learn a little at the same time. Here's a picture of "Ruby" (named by my father-in-law), my 62 Comet. More are at my web site linked below.

comet-transport_header01.jpg

Dan

1962 Comet - 2-Door, 170 cu.in.

http://www.dplivingston.com <-- follow my 1962 Comet restoration and check out my other (non-automotive) projects.

Edited by Quisp
typo (see edit history)

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Great car to Restore But you could put a solid front axle, some Hairy 800 H.P. Engine, move the rear axle ahead so it has Funny car status, Wheelie Bars on the Rr. and of course the Parachute just in case you really want to slow down.... :rolleyes:

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Great car to Restore But you could put a solid front axle, some Hairy 800 H.P. Engine, move the rear axle ahead so it has Funny car status, Wheelie Bars on the Rr. and of course the Parachute just in case you really want to slow down.... :rolleyes:

Chequenman, thanks. Not sure that's the direction I'm going. But I appreciate the advise.

Dan

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HOT ROD magazine had an article, about 1961, of Ford building a modified Falcon for the wife of a Ford executive, back then. The original 6 cylinder items were replaced with a 352 V-8. The article detailed what it took to put that FE-series engine in the Falcon. It all seemed a little flaky to me, even back then, that an exec's WIFE would want something with that much engine over the front wheels and NO power steering! It WAS a tight fit, too!

Those were pretty basic cars, back then. Pretty neat, too! Don't see them everyday, either.

Keep us posted on how things go, please.

NTX5467

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HOT ROD magazine had an article, about 1961, of Ford building a modified Falcon for the wife of a Ford executive, back then. The original 6 cylinder items were replaced with a 352 V-8. The article detailed what it took to put that FE-series engine in the Falcon.

Wow, love to find a reprint of that article. I would like to see how they shoe-horned it in.

Dan

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Geno,

Thanks for the welcome and a welcome to you as well. Any pictures of your Turino you can show us?

Dan

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Ron, thanks.

This weekend I;m rebuilding the carburetor. It's 10 deg. out so I need a few inside jobs to keep this project going over the winter.

Dan

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Ah yes, the fun begins. Rebuilding, cleaning, adjusting, making new again. To bad we can't do that with people. If you're married, I hope your wife is an understanding woman while you drag in all the dirty things inside the house to clean them up (I was lucky in that department). If all else fails, tell her it's a mandatory necessity to do that kind of work in a controlled environment, ha,ha.

Enjoy the journey.

Ron

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Hi Ron,

Yes, the wife pretty much understands what comes along with a project like this. Previous projects include building a full size replica of the Lost in Space robot in my basement. So she's used to seeing all kinds of 'parts" laying around the house.

Dan

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Here are a few before and after pictures of my carburetor. It's a good example of what gas can do to a carburetor from sitting in it for 30+ years. The engine was occasionally started which means the gas in the carb was replenished and then left to evaporate time and time again.

carb-before-after01.jpg

carb-before-after03.jpg

Dan

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Ron, I used GUNK carburetor cleaner. It comes in a 1 gallon paint can. There is a small metal basket inside that allows you to lower your parts down into the liquid. Clean as much off of your parts with a rag or pape rtowel and then lower them into the can for 20 minutes, then pull them out. Then a little scrubbing with a toothbrush and you are all set. Rinse your parts with water and blow out all the nooks and crannies with air.

Dan

Edited by Quisp (see edit history)

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