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Recommendations for Tire Suppliers


1957buickjim
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I will be looking to get new tires for my 1957 Buick this spring. Looking at bias ply www 7.60 x 15. Does anybody have any recommendations as to where to buy them at a reasonable cost? Thanks in advance for the help!

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If Discount Tire can do that, then that would be where to get them mounted, so that if anything's wrong, up front, it might be better than if you didn't have that arrangement. Just price shop to see what the charges might be (over and above the Coker price) . . . AND which store seems more agreeable to do that.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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Guest gunjeep444

I have bias Coker's on my 56. I've been told radials track better and don't roam around the road as much. Mine does that, but it has the springs that have been cut to lower it. I'm getting those replaced, so maybe the tires will be fine.

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Jim

The 2.5 in www BFG from Coker is the only tire that looks right. All of the other available tires in that size are 2.75-3.00 in and don't look right to me. My last set only lasted 15,000 miles (5,000 miles short of my previous 4 sets). If you are going to drive more than 15,000 miles in 5 years consider radials. You can get tires from Diamond Back made with 2.5 in www and they don't cost much more than the BFG. But if you don't drive much, stick with bias ply since around here radials start separating around 6 years. Judging: bias ply.

Tip: if you refinish your rims before mounting the new tires have them static balanced with the weights on the back side only. All of mine that I had done that way balanced out as good as dynamic balancing with the weights on both sides --- and they look much better.

No definite conclusions yet, but since I put radials on on of my 55's I have had two outer bearing failures in 7,000 miles.

I could not tell much difference in handling with radials, but this on a car with all front end components replaced.

Willie

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You may be able to add weights ONLY to the back side since the rims aren't that wide, but I have BEEN THERE, DONE THAT, and sometimes you just can't get a vibration free wheel with only the back side weights.

Did you give TIRE RACK a call? I'm not sure they could help, but worth a call IMO.

I wish you well,

Dale in Indy

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I believe that most of the modern electronic balancers can be set to put weights on just the backside of the wheel, rather than the more common "both sides". What about using adhesive weights (ala aluminum wheels) rather than the normal rim-clamp weights?

Back in the bubble balancer days . . . they either put the weights on the backside of the rim OR split the weight amount between the outside and inside of the rim. Seemed to work ok, either way, back then.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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Jim: Just go get used tires or better yet the dump has tires sometimes for free. I mean what's the worst that can happen? So you get a flat tire. Sooo what. With all the money you'll save by buying used, you can buy 2 or 3 extras and store them in the backseat area or the trunk as well to be at the ready. In addition to that, why take all these guys advice on spending "your" money like as if "they" actually know what they are talking about.

So here is what you should do:

You want white wall tires right? OK. So just go to the many sites that have white wall tire paint. Comes in cans and spray cans. Tape off the tires and paint. You will need to get enough paint for several good coats. Oh, yeah, use a brush on the first 3 coats in order to get this stuff on nice a thick, wet sand it down and then finish with the rattle can stuff for a nice even coat and finish. Then matte clear coat them with a UV blocker agent.

Yet another time proven method is to use those heat-gun applied white walls that are out there now. Just make sure to prep the side walls well and everything will be just fine and look at all the money you'll be saving to boot and this is something you can do yourself and feel real pride.

Don't listen to these money spending guys on this board. Save the money so you can spend it on all those dash pads! :D

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You know David, you may be on to something there! There are quite a few large tire piles in the Detroit area that I could find some salvagable tires at, and with the handy dandy whitewall paint, voila! New Wide Whitewall Tires...plus like you said, I could have a whole rack of spares, should one blow out! :D

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Guest shadetree77

Better yet, you can get some used white letter tires or tires with the small white wall. Then you can watch the video linked below and make your own wide white walls!! I plan on trying this out on some junk tires I have lying around just for fun to see how it looks.

Edited by shadetree77 (see edit history)
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Gheez Wizz and I was just joking around Jim! Had no idea rednecks were now a postin how they make those moonshine runners with white walls tires!

Had no idea....? Did you see the one where the guy actually "does" paint the other tire to match his white wall on the other side of his car?

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David, I think we are on to something here! The painting one is crazy as well. I guess it takes all kinds..

As for the grinding of the white walls, that makes sense, since the have to mold the black over the white to get the lettering / whitewall on the tires. It would just be a matter of whether the width of the underlying white rubber runs to the bead or not.

Crazy interesting, for sure!

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Well on a serious note and if truth be told. Some of these places our fellow Buick men referred you to above, I have been told, actually do this white wall expose the same way basically, but taking a new tire not a used one, and use a round ring abrasion face tool they set onto the sidewall of the tire and go at it and have different jigs for the various widths of white walls that are offered. Of course these rigs and jig setups render a superior and natural look, basically it is done the same way but more refined then these back street poor boys on youtube do theirs.

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Guest shadetree77

Jim, I'll post on here if I ever get to try it. Been having so many vehicular difficulties around here lately that I haven't had time for those "just for fun" projects. That one is top of the list though. I'll let you know when I get around to it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I know that this is a silly question, but how long should you have a tire on the car? I have only put about 1200 miles on these tires in 18 yrs. They have been stored on the vehicle mostly inside for that time. Do I really need new tires. Plenty of tread on the tires, and no sign of abnormal wear. BTW, they are the BFG from Coker correct WWW width (2.5 in). Comments anyone? Thanks.

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Thanks Dale. I was thinking that, but would like some feedback from the group, like I recievied from you. I did google the name, but wasn't sure if it was Summit Racing. Did not find any classic tires on the whole website, hence my request.

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I get my tires from coker and they're the bfg whitewalls. I like them.

I've never used the whitewall paint but know someone who has and he was unhappy with the outcome. Maybe he just applied it incorrectly?

Ive seen plenty of tires that have been ground to get a whitewall. Looks good from 5ft away but you can see the grind marks when you get close. Not a big deal if your not picky and can save you some $.

I like to drive my car everywhere so I'm not comfortable taking shortcuts on some things. Nothing like getting a flat in the middle of nowhere from some used tires. Guess it depends on what's acceptable to you.

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Dale..Thanks. Got it this time and pricing is better than catalog including shipping.

Raul - The grinding and whitewall paint are for the fun of it, most likely. Not happening on my car, that is for sure. I amwith you regarding the tires. Pretty important part of the whole driving picture, so no short cuts there. Thanks for the input.

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Those 18 year old tires probably look good and probably ARE good. Rubber formulations have changed significantly over the last few decades, leading to the current recommendations of replacing tires every 5-7 years regardless of mileage.

For driving around town and to cruise-ins, I wouldn't worry about new tires. For long distance highway driving, I would definitely err on the side of caution.

You will probably not be as pleased with today's tires after 18 years.

Best of luck with your new tires!

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They started date coding tires I believe not too many years ago. Yes and today, 5 - years is the accepted time frame due to U.V. degradation of the tire. But when you are not driving the car store the tires horizontally and in a shaded cool environment and you should be OK.

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Guest RACEJones

Better yet, you can get some used white letter tires or tires with the small white wall. Then you can watch the video linked below and make your own wide white walls!! I plan on trying this out on some junk tires I have lying around just for fun to see how it looks.

Give my wife a new set of tires and a few curbs and she will get wide white walls eventually. :rolleyes:

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  • 2 weeks later...

So Jim, what has your exhaustive research safari taught you so far regarding what is the bestest, coolest, smartest, mostest correctness white wall tire offering out there to this point ? Please share.

I seem to remember that there is but only 1 outfit out there that actually sells the tire that is actually made by the brand that is stamped on the tire. The rest of the herd sellers either buy or acquire license rights for a given name recognition brand, the molds or whatever and use god only knows who and where to make the tires. Maybe sorta funky? Still yet another setup gets some brand of tires somewhere, then does some of their "magic" to the side walls of the tire and wholla, you've now got yourself a www tire!

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