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SHOULD I BUY THIS 1940 PACKARD?


Guest Ben2009
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Guest Ben2009

I found this 1940 PACKARD suicide doors in my neighbor hood thing is i dont know much about them more familiar with cadillacs.. Asking 2,000 Now just wondering if its a good idea to buy it? heres more about vehicle: Good things are it has a motor, transmision straight six flat head, its almost complete. The bad things are its missing manyfolds, carborator, distribuator, and starter and front seat and one rear window and it has a little bit of cancer on the bottom of the doors and on the trunk.

:confused:

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Ben,

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. I personally know very little about Packards. Someone else can hopefully chime in with some words of wisdom. There is also a specific Packard Forum a little bit further down the page that you might want to do some reading in.

The best advice I can give you is make sure you do your homework before you decide to buy it. Just because it is close by does not mean it is the best vehicle for you to purchase. If the car really appeals to you, and you have the know how and tools and a place to work on it, it might be just what you need. It also might not be the right car for you. There are certainly drivable old cars available in the $2,000 price range. Where are you located? There may be a forum member or a member of a local AACA Region or Chapter who could offer you some assistance in evaluating the car.

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Guest Ben2009

Thank you, Im in the modesto central valley, ca. Yes im having trouble posting pictures not sure if you can see it on my profile picture.

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Guest Ben2009

Hey keiser,

No not yet only because i have no knowledge on these packards other then what i read this morning.. It seems like a pretty good deal, how hard is it to find parts for this vehicle?

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Guest Jim_Edwards

I would agree with Keiser31. Why isn't already sitting in your driveway? And don't buy it without the wheels and hubcaps. It will cost you more to replace them than the $500 you would save without them. Tires that hold air are worth half that if in half decent shape otherwise.

Don't worry about knowing anything about Packards, there a lots of resources, parts, an folks around to get you through a restoration. Just isn't a big problem.

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Guest straight shooter

$2,000 is a great deal for what looks to be a mostly complete and solid Packard. The problem is if you don't plan on doing most of the work yourself it will end up costing you a ton of money.

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$2,000 is a great deal for what looks to be a mostly complete and solid Packard. The problem is if you don't plan on doing most of the work yourself it will end up costing you a ton of money.

That will be the case with nearly any restoration, but since Packards are on the higher end of collecting, you probably can't go wrong in purchasing that car.

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I don't want to rain on your parade, but I would be concerned about the condition of the engine, the missing engine components, and what it is going to take in know how, parts, labor, tools, and $$$ to make that a drivable car.

The initial investment is only a small part of what it will take to make that car drivable.

Don't be fooled by the initial small investment. That thing is going to take a lot more than it is worth if you wish to restore it.

Your level of personal knowledge of restoration will certainly make a difference as to if that is a good or bad car for you to purchase. Hopefully we can find someone close by to take a look at it and give you some advice. Otherwise, you should post a lot of detailed photos of every square inch of that car inside and out, so that you can get the best advice possible.

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It's all a question of love and money.

If you love the car, then you can buy it at the cheap price and spend the money needed to restore it. As mentioned, you'll have tens of thousands of dollars in a car worth less, but if it's love, then one spends as is needed.

If you think it's a deal, then I'll pass some advice (paraphrased of course) I've gleaned recently from numerous conversations about restoration projects, and it's nothing new.

The most expensive car you ever own may be the cheapest you ever bought.

If you could buy a great six cylinder 1940 Packard for $20,000 (and a sedan probably so), then why buy this at a tenth the price and put all the effort and money into it? It is, for sure, probably worth more than $1500 mentioned in parts, though.

I don't agree with this position, just state it as it is these days, when the cost of chrome, paint, and upholstery, is so great, as to make the restoration of just about any car not cost effective..but if you love it, that's another story....

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There's a saying somewhere stating that there's nothing more expensive than a cheap car. (Trimacar just beat me in saying that by a minute)

If you're capable of doing a lot of work yourself then that statement may not apply.

I would personally jump at that deal in a heartbeat if it were near me.

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+1

It is very hard to tell from that single picture if 1500 is worthwhile for the car or not.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but I would be concerned about the condition of the engine, the missing engine components, and what it is going to take in know how, parts, labor, tools, and $$$ to make that a drivable car.

The initial investment is only a small part of what it will take to make that car drivable.

Don't be fooled by the initial small investment. That thing is going to take a lot more than it is worth if you wish to restore it.

Your level of personal knowledge of restoration will certainly make a difference as to if that is a good or bad car for you to purchase. Hopefully we can find someone close by to take a look at it and give you some advice. Otherwise, you should post a lot of detailed photos of every square inch of that car inside and out, so that you can get the best advice possible.

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Guest Ben2009

Thanks,

For all the info i am going to take as much pictures as can tomorrow so i will be getting back to you all soon. Not my first choice of car so wouldn't say love it but really do like the body and only attempted to restore a 1950 cadi so i have some exp, did not finish it. So would just be a slow project.

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Guest straight shooter

Ben, what is your first car of choice. If it isn't really expensive it might be better to look for one instead of the Packard. The restoration cost might be the same, you will enjoy restoring it more, and in the end you will have the car of your dreams.

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Ben, I agree with trimacar it all boils down to love and money. Time and money are always in long or short supply on any restoration, but the love of the project vehicle is a constant. Love what you're doing and the time and money you have invested will be worth the struggle. The key is to start with the car that you really like. This may not be the car that's the cheapest or closest to you. The Packard in your picture picture has a great deal going for it as mentioned by others. You will also find a great deal of parts,information and help for this car through this forum. I think the price is fair for this car but only if it's the one you really want. Just my 2 cents worth. Mark

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Guest Backyardmechanic

Hey Buy it do what needs to be done to get it running drive it for a while then sale it if you don't like it a driveable car will bring more then one not and also sale faster.

Vern

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Guest prs519

nOT bad, Vern! That way if he decides to sell it, he will (judging by these comments), be bound to make a profit on it!

Perry

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Speaking from some extensive experience. (about 50 years) if your main concern is price then the cheapest car that you can buy is the one that has been totally restored by experts. Even then you will probably still have to spend more money. However If you are not concerned how much you spend over perhaps a longer period of time and enjoy a challenge, have the ability the enthusiasm and the determination to follow the project through to completion then go for it. Just remember the world is littered with abandoned half finished projects.

oldcar.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Orphanauto

That is a 110 Packard. They sold ALOT of those, as well as the 120 eight cylinder Packard. It is what Packard called a Jr. series. The senior series are the 160, and 180 models. The Senior models had around 4000 made in all body styles and are the expensive ones, the Jr models were the ones that didn't cost so much to but, so, they sold alot. Here's the good news about that car. Becasue it's a 110, small six, and tey made so many, engine parts are much more plentiful, ( easier to get ) and cheaper. You can get just about everything you need for it. The bad thing is, because it's NOT the top Senior series, these sell for around $10,000 ( nice driver )to $15,000 ( super clean driver ) maybe close to $20,000 if TOTALLY like new, show car. So, you will probablt spend what it cost to make it nice for what it's worth, ( if you don't spend more ). Cool thing, becasue it's not the expensive models, you can drive it and enjoy it everyday.

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FOR $2 GRAND. WHY ISN'T THAT CAR IN YOUR DRIVEWAY. ALL NEGATIVE COMMENTS ASIDE. ALL RESTORATIONS DON'T HAVE TO COST $20K TO $50K.

TAKE YOUR TIME AND LOOK AROUND FOR MECHANICS AND UPHOLSTERERS THAT ARE HUNGRY. They are out there, and just let them know that you are not the sucker de jour!!!!!!!

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Guest straight shooter
I agree with AIK. Also a black paint job is not too hard a color to shoot yourself. Black is black unless Packard added some special tint in it make it different.

There are actually many shades of Black and it is considered one of the hardest colors to match. I was surprised when I heard that from a body shop guy.

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Hmm, I was told that about white. I've had to match a few black panels on some cars and luckily they came out nearly perfect using a generic black paint. These days I agree, there are many different shades of black but maybe 30 or 40 years ago maybe there weren't that many.

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I sold and bought Packards cars for over 10 years. Make sure you cars complete, especially the interior stuff. Dash plastic is expansive if needs, interior cloth the same. I believe the dash is painted so you don't have expensive wood graining, someone may correct me on this.

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  • 2 months later...
Thanks,

For all the info i am going to take as much pictures as can tomorrow so i will be getting back to you all soon. Not my first choice of car so wouldn't say love it but really do like the body and only attempted to restore a 1950 cadi so i have some exp, did not finish it. So would just be a slow project.

You may want to join packardinfo.com

it's a great site with plenty of sources.

Let us know how it works for you.

Ralph M Bohm

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There are actually many shades of Black and it is considered one of the hardest colors to match. I was surprised when I heard that from a body shop guy.

I had a Packard exacly like that and it had had an amateur lacquer paint job with runs in the doors. I took it to a body shop and asked the guy what he could do about it. He said he couldn't do lacquer but he could do the doors below the moldings in enamel and get the texture pretty close. And he did.

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