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Removing a Steering wheel - 33 chrysler Imperial CQ 4 dr sedan


augusta
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33 chrysler Imperial CQ 4 dr sedan. Can anyone advise on how to actually remove the steering wheel from the steering column. I have been able to remove the horn button and removed the nut from the steering column but can't figure out how the wheel comes off. It appears to actually be screwed onto the treads of the steering column.

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Guest billybird

You will probably need a steering wheel puller. Universal pullers have worked well for me and are reasonably priced at NAPA, Advance, etc. There should be 2 holes with threads on opposite sides of the steering shaft. Install the proper bolts from the puller in these. The center bolt then screws against the shaft to slowly remove the wheel. I always place something between the puller center bolt and steering shaft to prtect the threads. I have never removed the steering wheel from your particular model, but the many I have removed all come off basicaly the same way.

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Thanks for your response to my question about removing the steering wheel. I found no threaded holes on either sides of the steering shaft so a puller will not work. It really appears that the wheel would simply be screwed off the shaft but locking the steering shaft will be necesary for this to work but haven't figured out how to lock the steering shaft.

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Guest martylum

Augusta-I have a 33 Chrysler CQ 8 and seem to remember needing to drill 2 1/4 or 5/16" dia. holes opposite the enter steering shaft and threading for fine threaded bolts. After you do this you can use a standard steering wheel puller with the appropriate sized bolts. Do use penetrating oil and let it soak in several days.

I'm sure the wheel is not threaded on the steering shaft.

In that early 30's time period there were wheel pullers which had parts which reached under the spokes of the wheel and a center bolt which pushed down on the steering wheel shaft. These type of pullers hard to find today.

Take care you don't drill too deep and go through he steel center part of the wheel.

Attempting to pull these wheels with the old style puller at this point would probably crack up the black rubber covering on the wheel. The modern puller puts no stress on the rubber covering which may still be in good shape.

Martin Lum

1933 Chrysler CQ

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I imagine the 33 Chrysler is the same as the 36 Chrysler I have. I made a puller out of a couple of 2 by 4's and bolts. This wheel requires a special puller that goes behind the hub around the column. A better puller could probably be made from 2 x 6 scraps or larger. Mine worked but it took alot of coercing to get ti to come free and lots of penetrating oil. I have seen them on ebay before. Your manual should show the original puller. If not my manual does and I could email you a picture of the tool.

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Auburnseeker:

thanks for your reply to my steering wheel question. I would really like to see your picture. Unfortunately the only manual Chrysler produced for my year (33) gives a lot of information about the steering box but no pictures of a wheel puller nor any instructions about removing the wheel.

Bruce

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A Picture is worth a thousand words as the saying goes. Now I have a new problem and that is to find such a tool. I might be able to improvise something that would work. Was there any instructions that came with the picture you sent? The steering wheel in your picture looks just like mine only the horn button is different.

Bruce

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A Picture is worth a thousand words as the saying goes. Now I have a new problem and that is to find such a tool. I might be able to improvise something that would work. Was there any instructions that came with the picture you sent? The steering wheel in your picture looks just like mine only the horn button is different.

Bruce

Looks to me that your request for tool improvisation ideas was already posted in this thread:

I imagine the 33 Chrysler is the same as the 36 Chrysler I have. I made a puller out of a couple of 2 by 4's and bolts. This wheel requires a special puller that goes behind the hub around the column. A better puller could probably be made from 2 x 6 scraps or larger. Mine worked but it took alot of coercing to get ti to come free and lots of penetrating oil. I have seen them on ebay before. Your manual should show the original puller. If not my manual does and I could email you a picture of the tool.
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That's pretty much the same picture I have in my book. If you use anything with sharp edges or squared edges that are not rounded be sure to really pad the contact surface as it will damage the hub by cutting into it because of the amount of force you have to apply. There was a member on here that had a bunch of old Mopar tools for sale a couple of months ago. In the lot was one of these pullers. I was going to buy the lot but the only tool I wanted was the puller. It was 200.00 for the whole lot and shipping was alot because the tools together weighed somewhere around 100 pounds. I figured I would come across another some day.

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The Owatonna tool pictured here worked to remove my 1930 Studebaker steering wheel years back. I just had to make up a center "Pushing" part to press against the steering threaded metal tube end to prevent bending or damaging the threaded end. The Studebaker wheel hub was already drilled and tapped with two opposing holes in the flange 180 degrees apart.

Stude8

post-31139-14313877236_thumb.jpg

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I like the idea of making a single use puller out of 2X4s. You can contour the wood to cradle the hub of the wheel. Since the wheel is now old and possibly brittle, and the hub and shaft grown together over the last 80 years something that will apply a lot of force in a gentle manner seems called for.

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There is an attachment for use with standard 3 or 2 jaw pullers called a bearing puller. It is a rounded affair with two bolts designed to put behind a bearing and then attach with a standard 2 or 3 jaw puller. Often used on farm equipment to remove baring pressed onto a shaft. I used one to remove the steering wheel on my 1940 studebaker. Worked like a charm no damage to the wheel. Most auto parts stores should carry one. Remember to protect the center nut when pulling.

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  • 9 years later...
13 hours ago, Whistler said:

1930 Chrysler Series 66

How do I remove horn button/light switch/throttle assembly. Thanks 

You have to remove parts at the bottom of steering box to be able to pull up on the horn button and lever shafts:

 

The horn wire that comes out of the bottom of steering box needs disconnecting.

The light switch has a nut at the bottom that clamps the switch to the long inner light control shaft/tube.

The throttle linkage is clamped to it's control tube/shaft at bottom of steering box with a crosswise screw/nut.

 

Then these inner shafts/tubes are pulled upwards away from the steering wheel.  On a roadster/convertible there is no roof to get in the way when these long tubes come upwards.  If you have a coupe or sedan, you may not have enough room.  If so, then the steering box-to-frame bolts need removing, and also disconnect the steering column-to-dashboard bracket to lower the column to get more room.

 

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F & J is 100 percent correct.........this is more of a job than you think, and things can go wrong and assembly can be much more difficult than it looks like. 

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Removing a Steering wheel - 33 chrysler Imperial CQ 4 dr sedan

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