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1966 ford conv


Guest marlin65
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Guest marlin65

My brother-in-law is thinking of buying one of these.I'm a Chevy guy,he's not computer savvy and has never owned something this potentially expensive. Guy is asking $10,000. If someone would chime in and tell me what he should look for I will relay it to him. I also don't know if it's a 500 or 500 XL or ??? Thanks.

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Look for the same things you would look for in any convertible purchase- weak floors/trunk/frame, corroded wiring, top function, you get the idea.

As long as it is a Galaxie and not a Thunderbird, it will be a fairly simple car mechanically and electrically and Ford drivetrains back then were pretty stout.

I don't think there's as much repro parts support as for say a same vintage big Chevy, but Ford parts are still plentiful and their parts numbering system is infinitely more sensible than that mess GM foisted on us. I have yet to figure out how GM assigned individual numbers to its parts. Group # makes sense, individual parts # makes no sense at all- it appears to be totally random.

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By 1966, there was still the basic Ford car. The next upgrade was "Galaxie", for the full-size car. The fancier one was "Galaxie 500", which is probably the least expensive trim level which could be a convertible. The "Galaxie 500/XL" had bucket seats and console as standard equipment--pretty snazzy.

Base "standard V-8" was the 289 2bbl. Upgrades would have been a 390 2bbl, 390 4bbl, and the 428 4bbl . . . which made the basis for the "7 Litre" model upgrade on the Galaxie 500/XL model. Horsepower ratings would have been . . . 195-200 horsepower, 265 horsepower, 300 horsepower, and 345 horsepower, respectively, as I recall. Automatic trans would have been the cast iron FMX (former Cruise-O-Matic 3-speed automatic) or the new-that-year C6 Select-Shift (for console models) or regular C6 for column shift models. The C6 was in the same league with the GM THM400 and Chrysler 727 TorqueFlite. Rear axle ratio would have been in the 3.00 range for most standard applications. 1965 was the first year for 15" wheel/tire combinations being standard, too, plus "integral" factory a/c systems (no more hang-down evaporators as "factory air").

As mentioned, drivetrains were pretty much bullet-proof if they had normal maintenance, or even something less than that.

Like rocketraider mentioned, look at it as if it was any other similar model year convertible. Mechanical things and body integrity. The fact it's a Ford rather than a Chevy makes not difference in that respect.

Additionally, I'd look for anything that didn't look right . . . i.e., modified or changed from OEM configuration AND inquire as to why it was done. Hopefully, the car will be pretty much stock!

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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i heard the 65's had some serious rot problems in the frames. not sure about 66, but just look at it closely. any convertible needs a thorough look underneath anyway. that said, if it chevks out well all over, the price is good and they are fine cars to drive and look at. skyler

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Guest Jim_Edwards
My brother-in-law is thinking of buying one of these.I'm a Chevy guy,he's not computer savvy and has never owned something this potentially expensive. Guy is asking $10,000. If someone would chime in and tell me what he should look for I will relay it to him. I also don't know if it's a 500 or 500 XL or ??? Thanks.

1966 Fords were great cars. Chances are the car in question is either a Galaxie 500 or a Galaxie 500 LTD, the latter indicating a primarily an interior upgrade. In either case, the things that will affect value is engine size and functionality of the convertible top mechanism, as well as the condition of the top itself. It is also wise to look for rust issues underneath the car along within the trunk and the top storage area.

There were eight engine variations produced for full size Fords in 1966 but typically the car being a convertible probably came with a 352 or 390 FE block engine connected to a C6 automatic transmission. If the car has any variation of a 427 or 428 cubic inch engine the value would be greater than any of the smaller displacement engines. If the car should have a variation of the 289 small block V8 its performance will not be good. Just too much car and too little engine. Personally, if the car has a 352, 390, 427, or 428 engine in it I would have a mechanic inspect the condition of the valve train in the engine. FE block Ford engines all suffered from upper engine oiling problems which would lead to abnormal push rod, rocker arm, and rocker tube wear. While replacement parts are readily available who wants to buy a car to unexpectedly discover it needs major engine work.

Other things to look for would be rubber bushings deteriorated and beyond functional life. This is particularly important with bushings in the steering components and sway bar, as well as upper and lower control arm bushings. Shot bushings will make a car virtually unsafe to drive at any speed!

If your brother-in-law can give you the VIN number on the car as well as the info from the plate on the driver side "A" pillar we can decode it and be in a better position to provide an actual value range. Of course a photo or two wouldn't hurt either.

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Guest jukepin

The frame, the frame, the frame. Use an ice pick and ball peen hammer. Repair/ welding shops used to have templates made to repair 65/66 Ford Merc. frames. Also if the car has air check the heater core. Its an all day job to replace on these cars so equiped. Non air cars are easy. On the 352 engines the exaust manifolds leak and have to be machined flat.

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The frame, the frame, the frame. Use an ice pick and ball peen hammer. Repair/ welding shops used to have templates made to repair 65/66 Ford Merc. frames. Also if the car has air check the heater core. Its an all day job to replace on these cars so equiped. Non air cars are easy. On the 352 engines the exaust manifolds leak and have to be machined flat.

My '66 Galaxie convertible had frame rot that had to be welded up twice to pass a safety check. That was in 1974!!! Of course I lived in Nova Scotia Canada where the salt air just dissolved those cars. Even the constant fog has a high salt content.:D

The 352/ FE series warrants a removal of the valve covers to see how much gunk is in there. A common problem as I recall. If it looks gummy or shale in there you're in for a rebuild.

I still admire the looks of the 7 Litre , hardtop or convertible. Gorgeous interiors far superior to Chevrolet in style and wear.

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