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1988-90 Alternators


padgett
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i dont think they did. The ESM i have only lists one alternator and that's the 108 that i've seen on every reatta. However the parts house computers list a 120 for the car that looks different but i trust the ESM over the parts computers

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Suspect the 108 is the small frame CS-130

Only listing ones above 90A

K09 - 120A

K60 - 100A

K61 - 97A

K65 - 95A

K68 -105A

K90 - 108A

K92 - 105A

Page 6D3-5 in the 88 FSM (similar in others) only lists a 120A CS144 K09 p/n 1101331. This also is the only generator mentioned in the 90 FSM (pg 6D3-7)

The same page answers my earlier question about the regulator connections - they are soldered as mentioned by MC_Reatta (hard to believe but true - no wonder the video does not show their removal).

What ESM are you looking at please ?

Does anyone have an SPI with something other than K09 ?

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Suspect the 108 is the small frame CS-130

Only listing ones above 90A

K09 - 120A

K60 - 100A

K61 - 97A

K65 - 95A

K68 -105A

K90 - 108A

K92 - 105A

FWIW, my '90 Regal has K60 - which is a 100 amp CS-130. (And it is on its third one.) Reatta is K09. Suburban came with a K68, a 105 amp CS-130D. But as I mentioned above, when it blew I replaced it with a CS-144. Note that despite their similar numbers a CS-130 and a CS-130D are very different from one another.

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Guest Richard D

With current draw and battery amp hours in most modern cars about the same why have so many different alternators? Would it not be cheaper to make a 130 amp model that fits most cars? Police, tow vehicles, etc. would have bigger ones.

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The number of different outputs for the same basic unit also seems uncharacteristic of normal GM policy (of the era anyway) of reusing as many common parts as possible to reduce costs. That is a lot of [needless] variations on the same part.

Then again, GM was also fond of not giving the customer anything more than was absolutely necessary. So, if a car only needed a max of 100A output from the alternator, why put in one with 105A output. That would be an unjustified upgrade in the minds of the GM bean counters who were in control during the 80's and 90's.

I especially like the 95A and 97A versions. Yeah, a difference of 2 amps was worth doing another model for. That right there is the definition of abject stupidity. Yes, I'm being critical. I guess I am just in that kind of mood tonight.

KDirk

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Was more of a mix and match. The 10 DN in 1965 came in four flavors (37, 42, 55, 63 amp) with the same case, two armatures, and two stators. Eight if you count the reversed diode bridge for positive ground cars. It was replaced in the '70s by the SI series with was pretty much the same.

My listing above was all of the codes in GM in 1988 and were a mix of SI and CS alternators (I left off all below 90A and there were a lot). Biggest difference was size, the old SIs where space was a problem and bigger CS130 where less and the even bigger CS144 where none (see 2-4-6 plug wire routing on a 3800).

From that standpoint, most of the dozens of alternators used one of the four case sizes (15 and 17 SI was between the 10 SI and CS130 and different combinations of common innards for the different ratings.

As to why all of the different numbers, was usually related to the expected load but was also wound differently for low rpm operation than for high (and a Reatta cruises happily at 1250 rpm so the alternator was sized for max load there which may have been a whole bunch less than at the peak. You really need to look at the curves and the duty cycle.

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In the late 80s and in the 90s, most of GMs vehicles really only used two alternator designs - the smaller case CS-130, which was replaced around 1995 with the CS-130D, for most cars and light duty trucks. Then the larger case CS-144 for larger vehicles. Around 1999-2000, the CS series was superseded by the AD series (e.g., the AD-230, AD-237, and AD-244). From about 2005 onwards, the voltage regulator can actually be computer controlled!

Note that there are variations of each case for mechanical things like mounting ear location and pulley type. This is not reflected in the RPO codes, but does create a lot of extra part numbers for a FLAPS computer to know about.

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