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Finish Question


dl456
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Hi all,

I am prepping a 47 Continental cabriolet for paint. The inner fenders and underneath hood has a thick undercoating on them that appears original.

I have seen restored cars with these areas finished and painted like the exterior. I like this look so we started removing this undercoat and were planning to strip and finish. We have encountered factory welds (unfinished on the interior) and other factory features that were covered by the undercoating. i know and can recognize a lot of factory hand and custom work on these cars.

Is this undercoat factory? What is the general feeling about the proper finish on these areas? Basically, should I leave it alone or strip it and paint?

I am building a very nice original driver from a almost rust free car.I am a purist

but prefer driving to judging.

What do you guys think.

Thanks,

Dennis

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Hi Dennis,

As far as I know, the undercoating was factory and those of us that have restored one, know well the hours of heating and scraping involved in cleaning it all off. I just finished a 41Continental and I will leave the underside in paint until the first time I show it, after that, I will have a bed liner coating sprayed under the fenders to #1 protect them from stone chips and #2 to quiet the noise down when things are thrown against the undeside.

On my car the inner fenders and the backside of the fendrs and skirts were painted car color, then undercoated.

If you are just planning on a basic restoration to drive, then as long as the undercoating is still solid and attatched I'd leave it alone. You can always scrape it off, repaint the inner fenders, then reapply, but why bother, a few miles down the road and nobody will notice the effort anyway.

Tom

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Thanks Tom,

I may go ahead and finish up the fenders and if I decide to re-coat these areas, at least it will be a much neater job.

What are your thoughts on the hood underside? This is likely the most visible and objectionable area but in the absence of an insulator, I wonder how much noisier it will be.

I'd also like to hear some opinions of others on this forum.

Come on Lincoln guys what do you think? Do I have to go Packard forum to get an argument

I mean discussion started!

Just Kidding

Dennis

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Could not find a listing of any hood pad for the 40-41 Lincoln Continental in the master Lincoln Chasssis Parts Catalog or the 36-40 Lincoln chassis Parts catalog or Body Parts catalog. But in the LCOC 40-48 Lincoln Continental Restoration manual on page 46 is says under "HOOD" that 1940-1941 had a black heavy insulation pad with a waffle pattern inserted in the rear most section of the hood between the frame sectins. Probably the same type of a pad that was glued to the insides of the door panels for sound proofing.

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Guest Jim_Edwards

That black, sometimes sticky, material was/is actually used to prevent resonance in flat metal panels. Though having some insulating qualities it is primarily a sound absorber. It was also commonly created using an asbestos filler but given the sticky nature of the material it is not today considered a bio hazard other than in disposal.

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Guest Jim Zephyr

I remember when I first got my 1940 LC - there was this pesky piece of black insulation that was hanging down in the rear section of the hood - I should have taken the time to glue

it back in place, not realizing it to be original I discarded it. Not only would it act as a sound proofer but I am more certain it protects the leaded seam area from heat distortion.

Do postwar connie hoods have this same weld 6" from the end?

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Guest Jim Zephyr

Thanks John, the 42 to 48 hoods are so different than the Zephyrs they must have stamped them out fresh as opposed to the modified hoods on our 40s. I wonder if 41s have the welded extension?

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Talking to Dr Dave with the beautiful pre-war Cabs, he is very helpful and familiar with this waffle insulation and has discussed with the club editor; some of this I just learned talking today. The factory would pull off about 3 zephyrs every day of about 100 or so and make them into Continentals by hand (trim, polish heads, etc.). The hoods and fenders needed to be stretched the 8" or so, and these extensions in 1940 and about the first 1/3 of 1941 production were hammer-welded on. A lost art now, but did a beautiful job, and covered it up from the bottom for a clean finished with the insulation strip. As the sales continued to do well, Ford tooled up and made the hoods/fenders one piece the last 2/3's of 1941 and thereafter. So it is factory stock in 40 and part of 41 depending on the car#. Explains a lot of the increased sales price for the longer ones!

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Hello all,

We have decided to strip all undercoating, epoxy prime and finish in body color. Discovered some slight surface rust under the undercoat that needed to be addressed.

That being said, there will be free food, beer and scrapers at my shop for the next month or so. All are welcome!

Merry Christmas

Dennis

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