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Here we go again: - 

Today as part of my trip preparation I will be changing the Lagonda's engine oil, it is a little over due for this change but this is not a great worry. The sump (oil pan) holds two (Imp)gallons. I also change the oil filter at the same time. This is a modern (spin on) type. I write the date and milage on the side of the filter's body using a felt tipped marker pen. The level has only just reached a point where, if I was not about to change the oil, it would need topping up.

I use Penrite 20w/60 which is about equivalent  to what SAE30 would have been in 1934.  This is also used in the gearbox so the difference between ten litres (The oil comes in 5 Litre containers) and two gallons does not go to astray.

 

This brings me to my next question:-

How often do you change the engine oil in your Classic/Vintage car?  

 

Bernie j.

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Six hours later and the job is done. I spent some time wiping up any traces of oil around the engine in the hope of locating one or two oil leaks.

I do spend some time chasing these leaks down but there always seems to be some stray oil drops left under the car. I suppose that IF I stopped driving it I would not have any of these worries. 

59426.

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Celebrating the world's first competitive motor hillclimb. For more info  go to // www.comiteducentenaire.org

 

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 Chanteloup 1.jpeg

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Thank you John. If you go to the gallery of past events (2014) you may see a familiar car.

Re the Cadillac event. The place in France predates the car of the same name by a few hundred years.

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Coming home from the VSCC, Mid-week, end of year run on Wednesday we managed to get caught up in some traffic, at one stage the radiator reached boiling point on the temperature gauge. This is something quite unusual for the Rapier as the electric fan should cut in at about 85/90 degrees. This did not happen which in some ways was a good thing. As it is the fan may only switch on once every three or four years. Normally I would check its operation every year or so. 

Thinking about all this, in fact it must be quite some time since I last tested it. Over-riding the thermo switch produced a NO-GO result. Taking the fan off to test it on the bench showed it was seized solid. Now all these clever modern things are made in such a way as to be impossible to dismantle. All this goes against all my principles but with next years trip in mind I lashed out and bought a new fan. Of course none of the mountings are the same as the old one, so now I will have to make a visit to the steel merchant to buy a length of steel strip in order to fabricate some mountings for the new fan. Hopefully I can still use the original thermo switch.

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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