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SeventhSon

Avanti Rescue

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I agree that debris is probably a valve guide seal - be sure to check the oil pump pickup and be sure there are no pieces inside or openings in the screen large enough to let pieces in - if in doubt pull it off and take the pump apart. Years ago I had an engine ruined that way, the debris locked up the oil pump and broke the pump drive shaft to the distributor.

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Don - I agree, I will take a closer look at that oil pump. I looked at it the other night and the pickup was pretty clean, just a small piece of debris that I have to pluck out of the screen.

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That debris looks bigger than valve guide seals. I think it is more like one of the gaskets on the valve cover that seals the two bolts holding the cover on. Check them out.

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Thanks John - I was looking around that site but didn't find anything about oil pan color.

R1 & R2 engines are black, the oil pan too. If it would be my car, I would do another color. Not very relevant: on my scale model, I did the engine dark red metallic instead of black. I don't regret it!

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Dale, I think you're on to something. I bet you're probably right - I hope so because that would be the least problematic answer.

Roger - thanks for the info, I should have ask you first since you are the master artist of the models of these cars. Not sure how mine got orange paint on it - I think I'll paint it black. Hmmm...a Rolling Stones song comes to mind....

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Well, black it is. After hearing from all you guys and confirming with Nimesh Solanki, it is: black. Thanks for the info, everyone!

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I got a call right before lunch that my valve covers and lifter valley cover re-plating was ready, so I drove over to Maryland at lunch to pick them up. Very nice job they did - I'm very pleased with how they turned out.

Thank you Metro Plating and Polishing of Kensington, MD!

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No sooner had I returned from Maryland when I got a call that my front suspension parts were ready. Wow - all these parts coming in, I can start putting this thing together!

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After work I made my way to Falls Church and picked up the suspension parts. Very nice job they did - I couldn't do it myself because of the lack of tools and expertise, so I'm lucky I found the right folks to do the job. Thanks to Dave Thibeault for pointing me to those right folks. And a big thanks to Craftsman Automotive in Falls Church, VA for doing a great job!

I still need to clean the parts up and paint them. When I first took them to Craftsman we agreed that paying them to clean and paint the parts would be an added expense, so I was fine with doing that part myself later.

It's been a long and expensive day, but I am very happy with the results, thanks to some excellent people.

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That debris looks bigger than valve guide seals. I think it is more like one of the gaskets on the valve cover that seals the two bolts holding the cover on. Check them out.

I got to thinking late last night about the pieces you found in the oil pan, and came to the same conclusion as dale did - the 'bottom' part of the valve cover grommet (ie, the part that sticks inside the valve cover). And now that I see the pieces in relation to the size of the nickel, I'm sure that is what it is. I've seen these as hard as bakelite too! :)

Chrome looks great..........and that has to be the fastest chromer in the world!

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Yeah, I think Dale called it. When I came home today I rummaged through the boxes of new parts and found the new replacement grommets that go on the valve covers and I agree - that's probably it. And yes, they do bake and turn into bakelite!

I'm very happy with the chrome too - at first Steve Polsky of Metro Plating told me Feb. 1 they would be done, so I figured I had another week to go. Surprise, got them early! Very nice - very happy with them!

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Not much work on the Avanti yesterday - I did receive some parts from Studebaker International, most notably the oil pan gaskets. Also, the trunk latch cable and handle. I thought I would be able to salvage the old cable but, upon closer inspection, I found the cable had actually rusted into one piece in one area. And the handle was missing on mine. Now I can install that cable and re-install the fuel tank access panel. But first, the oil pan goes back on.

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Friday morning here and raining hard! Washing away all the sand they put on the parking lot because of ice last week here at work.

Speaking of work, I didn't have much time last night to do much more than clean up the old oil pan gaskets so I can get the oil pan put back on. It was really too late by the time I got home to do much but I decided to try to get something accomplished. So, engine block is clean where the oil pan goes, and hopefully I'll have the time tonight to put it back on.

Maybe I can hit a hardware store today and get some long bolts to use as guide pins, as Paul recommended. That will certainly help the re-install, I believe.

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Oh, I almost forgot - on the Studebaker oil drain plug, is there a standard washer or gasket for that plug? There are remnants of a plug gasket on the drain plug, just wondering if there was a standard one you guys use when changing oil. Thanks.

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Chris, I always use copper. You can get a few at any auto parts store, just bring in your bolt for a good fit.

Question, what are you going to do about your exhaust system? Stainless or ???????

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Thanks Roger and John, I'll stop by Fairfax Auto Parts and see what they have. I've bounced around on the exhaust system - I started out thinking I would go stainless from the same guy you got yours from John. I believe the guy in Canada. Then I thought I would get a system from Dave Thibeault. I'm sure it will be stainless with medium tone mufflers. I was going to hold off on that until the last because the money well is dry. I bought too many parts - all necessary though. I did receive the first components of the exhaust yesterday - 2 shiny chrome exhaust deflectors from Avanti Parts & Restorations! It's a start on the exhaust.

Also, while spending quality time with my Avanti, underneath staring up at all the work that needs to be done, I noticed that the left side "down pipe" on the exhaust is being held on by just 1 nut, allowing the pipe to flop around. The other exhaust flange bolt has withered away, barely having any threads left to hold a nut. So, I ordered the flange repair kit from SI, which came this week with the oil pan gaskets. More fun! I always hated replacing those flange bolts, frozen in place and hard to get to. On the bright side, the suspension is not in the way and neither is the starter!

Edited by SeventhSon (see edit history)

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Well, the oil pan is back on. I cannot stress enough how much fun that was. I guess if I was an old Studebaker mechanic and I did a few of those a week I'd probably get pretty good at it! Pretty difficult assignment, so much so that last night I was ready to take a walk from this project. Instead I simply turned the drop light off, left the tools on the floor under the car, and called it a night. There's always tomorrow, right?

So, tomorrow, which was today, I finished getting the oil pan bolts back in (the ones up under the crossmember being the most fun), put a new oil filter on (thanks John) and tried out the copper drain plug washer I got today. Which didn't fit. Oh well, there's always tomorrow!

I know the oil pan probably should be semi-gloss black, but for now it's gloss black. I'll probably repaint it (without removing it!) in the future. And, in a few years, when I have the engine rebuilt, there will be a new oil pan put on. This one has serious rust pitting (really!).

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I found the correct size copper drain plug washer and installed it on the drain plug. Then, since I don't have rocker covers on the engine yet, I went to fill the crankcase with oil through the lifter valley. First I wanted to sop up what I thought was standing oil in the lifter valley. I was surprised to find that under the "puddles" of oil was sludge, hiding in the nooks and crannies. So I dug all of that out with numerous paper towels. Hopefully there's not too much more hanging around, if so I guess the good quality detergent oil will take care of it.

Then I poured about 5 quarts of Valvoline VR1 20W50 Racing Oil in and, since it's a Studebaker, a bottle of STP. Both of these lubricants contain ZDDP, which is a must for the metal on metal camshaft to lifter mating. So, I'm content that the power plant is in good hands as far as oil goes. I can't wait until the day I get to start her up - maybe 8 weeks from now? I hope...

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I decided to experiment with a brush on rust treatment where the front suspension control arms go. I used Rustoleum Rust Reformer mainly because of its brush on, odorless application. Goes on white, supposed to dry black but I didn't see where it did that. I mean, it went on white, but didn't really dry black. No big deal - like I said, I was experimenting. I know there are other products that are probably better suited for this purpose, most notably Eastwood's Rust Converter. I will probably use that in the future for the overall frame treatment, when the car is in another location. Right now I don't want to use any distillate based, high VOC treatments while the car resides where I reside. Not good to breathe those vapors and have them permeate the living quarters.

For now I will just treat those areas where I am going to bolt on new parts. Then I'll probably use a semi-gloss black paint (Rustoleum) in those same, limited areas.

In these pictures the treatment is still wet.

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Is there not a minimum temperature to apply such products?

And, while you are at that: give one or two hammer blows on that piece of sheet metal near one of the cross member's holes...

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
comment added (see edit history)

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Ha ha - yes, that tear in the metal bothers me too (not as much as hammering it out is going to bother someone else!). Probably a tow hook that didn't fit too well...

Yes, the minimum temp for application is 50 degrees F. I was probably right around that, maybe a teeny bit below...?

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