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SeventhSon

Avanti Rescue

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If you don't want to damage the boot or the joint on the tie rod end try smacking the side of the part where the tapered shaft for the tie rod goes through with a 2 lb. hammer. Usually a few good smacks and the tie rod end will pop right out. If you are not worryed about damaging the tie rod end the pickle fork works too, if you have one.

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The best way to free up the tie rod end is to hold a large metal hammer against one side of the holder part and then strike it with a ball peen hammer on the side 180 degrees opposite, the trick here is to momentarily deform the tapered body that clinches the tapered tie rod end with the hammmer strike and the tie rod will fall out of the holder part. Works every time for me.

Stude8

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Yes, I have a pickle fork and it worked great on the 3 other tie rod ends but this last one wouldn't give up the grip. And since I'm working with limited space, no vice or anvil, and lots 'o neighbors I thought I would just ask the shop mechanic if he could pop it out. He said, "No problem, sometimes ya gotta heat 'em up." Which I've also done before. But it's all good now, I dropped the control arms and spindles off at a shop that Dave Thibeault recommended and I'm happy to have that part of the work in the right professional's hands.

So tonight I received the Stewart Warner fuel sender unit. I was going to put the SunPro sender unit and the SW unit side by side and compare them and make a decision on which to use. But, when I took the SW sender out of the box and started looking it over I decided it was the unit I wanted to go with. It's a simpler design but looks like it is well made. About half the cost of the SunPro. Also, the original sender is an SW. So I followed the instructions, cut the float rod to the prescribed length for the tank depth, bent the float rod at 90 degree angle and inserted it through the center of the sender unit. Then the float rod is supposed to lock into 2 plastic "grips". As an added precaution I took some of my new best friend, JB Weld, and applied it to the rod at the grips, just for extra hold.

I then checked the resistance and I was getting around 240 ohms when the float was all the way down (empty) and around 30 ohms when the float was all the way up (full). So, I'll install the sender in the tank tomorrow night and put the tank back in the car.

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I ordered some strangely named rubber refresher from Amazon and received it today. It's a German product - hence the odd name. Not that Germans are odd, just a different language. I thought I would see if I could coax some semblance of pliability back into the rubber seals around the windows, etc. However, I think the bottles are too small - I need it by the gallon. I also need a paint brush to apply it liberally. Oh well, I'll rub it on and see if it helps any.

I installed the sender unit - after comparing the two to see if they matched on the low end. The new one is a tad higher than the old one - that's good, right? A little higher and it'll show empty when I still have a couple of gallons left.

One of the mounting holes got some tank sealer in it and the screw wouldn't fit any more, so I took a drill and knocked some of the sealer off. No problems after that. I know I'm going to have to remove one of the screws to put the ground wire on - easy enough to do. The tank is back in - not all bolted in, but well on the way.

Next up, the dreaded oil pan removal. Remove the 100 lb. starter motor, the greasy inspection plate, the breather tube. Someone beat me - I'd rather do that than take this oil pan off. But, once it's done, it's done and I'll be happy it's done. I do want to see if there is any sludge in the pan. I also want to see what the drain plug threads look like, I haven't taken a close look at the plug but it looks like some vice grips have been gnawing on it.

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I ordered some strangely named rubber refresher from Amazon and received it today. It's a German product - hence the odd name. Not that Germans are odd, just a different language. I thought I would see if I could coax some semblance of pliability back into the rubber seals around the windows, etc. However, I think the bottles are too small - I need it by the gallon. I also need a paint brush to apply it liberally. Oh well, I'll rub it on and see if it helps any.

Strange world: you buy a German product for your rubber and we, in Europe, are buying an US product to do that!

Don't be fooled by such products: I may be wrong, but you never will get your weatherstrips like new. It's like a beauty cream: even applied everyday with a large brush on a 80 years old face, the skin will never turn back like it was when 20 years old...

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Roger, that's a great analogy. If someone could find the formula to turn an 80 year old face into a 20 year old face they would be very, very rich! I didn't think I could get the rubber to like new - I was just hoping to find something to soak into the window seals and maybe swell them up some. All the door, trunk, and hood weatherstripping is going to be replaced in the coming weeks.

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Roger, that's a great analogy. If someone could find the formula to turn an 80 year old face into a 20 year old face they would be very, very rich!

You bet, Chris!

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Rubber conditioning is possible to an extent. To start off with, buy a bottle of Automatic Transmission Sealer/Conditioner (not the cheap stuff, which is probably mineral spirits or kerosene). Soak some parts in it for a while to see if it is enough. I put this stuff in power steering units to soften up the seals on the steering rack, and in automatic transmissions to swell the seals and stop the leaks. It also restores dry windshield wiper blades (just wipe and let it soak in and dry before smearing the windshield).

I actually make the conditioner I sell. 1 part of an Ester/Diester Group V synthetic oil (very solvent) and 19 parts Dexron.

That way when you put 16 ounces in a transmission, or 1/3 of that in a power steering system, you can't really screw up. In certain special cases I use a hypodermic needle with a small amount of the pure synthetic in a hydraulic system or differential. I never use a lot because it is strong, and costs $400 a pail in the US (wholesale).

Check this chart

Products in the column on the left won't show much change. Be careful with the products in the list on the right if you buy the synthetic full strength, but they will soften and expand in the Automatic Transmission Conditioner.

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Thanks Richard, I'm going to experiment with some things, if only to hold off the inevitable, which is, buy all the rubber for the car and install it. The hardest thing to do is always the right thing to do.

Today I finished re-installing the fuel tank, except for installing the new rubber fuel lines in the various spots. I thought I would get by the auto parts store today for the fuel lines but I didn't because of the weather. So, I used the time around the house to work on the tank re-install. I finished tightening the holding straps, put a new electrical connector on the lead wire to the sender and hooked the wires back up. While I was in the back of the car I decided to see how the interior would clean up. Some good, some not good - ah well, more fun inside the car once I get the mechanical stuff sorted out.

After I goofed off for a while I returned to the tank and worked on fixing the filler tube where previous people had sort of mangled it while getting a locking gas cap off. I was able to straighten the lip enough to take the gas cap, then I used a Dremel tool to smooth the lip so the gas cap would go on smoothly and stay put. Not perfect, but it will do. Then I installed the filler tube along with the rubber filler hose. Then I got under the car and installed the brass petcock. Enough for today - more fun tomorrow!

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Well, I bit the bullet and removed the oil pan. In the process I found that the starter wire sheathing was brittle and cracked (surprise!), exposing the copper wire. Another thing to fix.

On the bright side, the oil pan was pretty clean for a 49 year old car. I just found a coating of sludge maybe an eighth of an inch thick in the very bottom of the pan. On a more ominous note I was unpleasantly surprised to feel several chunks of what I thought was metal as I was wiping the sludge out of the pan. I collected several pieces on a paper towel, along with some sort of blowfly or insect (how did he get in there?) to examine later. I tried to pick some of the pieces up with a magnet but it didn't pick them up. Not metal, but what? I'll have a closer look tomorrow when I have more light and a magnifying glass.

Tomorrow I'll paint the outside of the pan, first I'll hit the rusty areas with Rust Reformer, then I'll paint it with orange paint. I want to get the pan back on pretty quickly and move on to something else. What that something else is depends on when the parts I have out for rebuild come back.

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Engine is very clean! Are you going to check a bearing or two?

Ben

I would do it too...

Regarding the pieces you found: it that plastic or aluminum? are the pistons OK? GM had plastic coated cam sprocket; with time the plastic get brittle and pieces are goind into the oil pan. However, I doubt that Studebaker did that as early as 1963.

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Hi Ben

I just hope that you don"t think it all a waste of time. I would be investigating those bits of Plastic? Aluminium? Brass? Lots of non-magnetic bits can still do damage. Maybe they are nothing but they must have come from somewhere. How about if that beetle had found its way into an oil gallery? I know it is a nearly new engine by my standards but it is always better to be sure than sorry.

Bernie J

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I know it is a nearly new engine by my standards but it is always better to be sure than sorry.

Bernie J

All things are relative: for some, 1963 is very, very old and for you it's almost a new engine!

You are right about the small found parts; you can described it better than me.

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I don't think I'll start pulling bearing caps at this point. The engine sounded nice when I took delivery of the car, no ticking or knocking, no screeching either. I'm going to take a closer look at those pieces I found - maybe they're part of the supercharger impeller that had deteriorated and were blown in through the breather tube. I hope that's all they are...

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Well, the the debris in the first picture is definitely plastic or Bakelite, and as you can clearly see it is some sort of seal or bushing(?). The debris in the second picture is more like coal, possibly a carbon build-up that ended up in the oil pan. It's the first picture's contents that concerns me. Where, oh where did that come from?

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Just a guess, but it looks like the remnants of an "O" ring that got hard. I say that because it looks similar to the O rings that I replaced in the Corvair push rod tubes when they got overheated.

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Just a guess, but it looks like the remnants of an "O" ring that got hard. I say that because it looks similar to the O rings that I replaced in the Corvair push rod tubes when they got overheated.

This could be the valve seals that fit on the valve stems>. Best is to remove the valve cover pans for a look see.

Vern

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Chris, I would explore around the oil pump area. I think that the holes moving oil from the valve area are too small to pass those large pieces unless they got beat up by the springs. Also they could be part of the oil bottle keeper that holds on the cap. If they did not remove it, it could have dropped into the valves when they tipped the bottle over into the valve cover. Been there, done that.

And glad you cleaned out the pan, now your oil will be clean at your first fill. And a lot less worry.

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Chris,

Just curious, why have you chosen orange for the oil pan color?

The small pieces that you got out of the oil pan are interesting, but it's hard for me to get a feel for the size. Could be a part of one of the original 'umbrella' valve seals, like several others mentioned. I've found those almost as hard as bakelite before!

When you put the oil pan back on, the front and rear cork seals that go into the curved sections of the oil pan will be a bear to position correctly, and get the pan up at the same time. It's hard enough doing it with the engine upside down on a stand, much less on your back under the car. Take four loooong bolts the same size as the pan bolts, cut the heads off and cut slots in the end, and put them at the four corners of the block -- these will help you position the pan correctly while you start some of the pan bolts. And....whatever you do.....don't shorten those front and rear pan cork sections; they may seem like they are too long, but they will fit eventually. Shortening them is a sure way to end up with oil leaks.

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John, I'm hoping that the pieces came from the topside, that way it may be easier to correct. I can't think of where else in the bottom end they could have come from, definitely an automotive seal of some type.

Paul, great advice - I'm going to use it, too! The oil pan is currently orange (mixed with spots of rust), I'll post a few pictures of it in a while. I'm thinking the pieces may be valve seal related too - I'll have a look at the topside of the engine to see. And I really appreciate the advice on getting the pan seals on correctly. When I got the car there were several new gasket sets laying on the back seat, one of which was the oil pan gaskets. I looked at the cork seals and thought, "Jeez, where do these go?" So, now I know, and I now know not to cut them to fit. A big help. I was going to use that set but decided to get a new set from SI because that old set has sat in that car in the searing Texas heat for over 20 years. Best to have some fresher gaskets. Thanks for the advice, everyone.

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A couple of more pictures to show scale of size compared to the nickle. Also, a picture of the oil pan - does orange vs. black signify anything? Is is just what they had on hand that day? I think the engine block is orange too, when you scape away the grime.

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Chris, I believe the engine is suppose to be painted red. Orange for the supercharger and the fan. I think there is a paint color id for everything in Bob Johnstone's tech pages. I will see if I can find it.

Found the link to the colors. Here is the link. http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3/text2009/detailpaint.html

And I also asked Greg. Here is what he said. "Studebaker R 1 and R2 engines were all black. block, heads, water manifolding, pan, everything including the fuel pump. Earlier ones had chrome valley covers and later ones black. All had chrome valve covers.

Superchargers themselves a matter of controversy. Dick Bennett claims all were black from the factory and orange were replacements. None of my cars and most of the originals I've seen were Chevy orange. Since you can argue both ways, both colors must have made their way out of the plant."

Edited by unimogjohn
added color link and Greg's comments (see edit history)

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