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No keys for my 64 Riviera


Guest rnoswal
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Guest rnoswal

I bought the car but it didn't come with any keys. It had been sitting for quite a long time, the last registration I can find is for 85. So the keys were lost. Is there anyway of getting another set for my car without having to buy new locks and ignition switch?

I was thinking of trying to pull the ignition switch from the dash. I don't know what kind of glue or muscle man tightened the assembly but I can't get it loose. Any hints there? More rust than I thought on the car especially above the front windshield, but still worth it.

Russ

Edited by rnoswal
addresses were imbeded and got rid of them (see edit history)
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Could be a long shot, but in one of my cars, I found two separate hidden sets of keys in two separate hide-a-key magnetic little boxes in the rear of the car on top of the rear portion of the frame near the gas tank.

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Guest rnoswal

I had been hoping for a hiding place like you mentioned, nothing yet but those are some new places to look. Thanks for the heads up on that.

Russ

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I had a key cut using the lock cylinder from the door; I had the skin off anyway so it wasn't a big deal. If there's a code on the glove box lock that would be much less of a hassle. Find the oldest lock company in your area and take it to them.

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I had a key cut using the lock cylinder from the door; I had the skin off anyway so it wasn't a big deal. If there's a code on the glove box lock that would be much less of a hassle. Find the oldest lock company in your area and take it to them.

I have had several cars that I have had to do this way. Most were Chevrolets and the lock cylinder comes out pretty easy. A good locksmith can make a key to match the cylinder you have.

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If you have had other `60`s Buicks and have left over keys try them. There were not that many combos. I have about 30 left over keys I keep on a large ring and often have had luck doing this. It`s a long shot but a thought which does not occur to most,

Tom Mooney

P.S. Your `64 should be a one key system from the factory if the locks or ignition switch has not been changed.

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Guest rnoswal

I called a locksmith that knew about these older cars. I took the lock out of the glove box and asked them if it was possible to do what you guys were talking about. He said that my car and other Buicks, maybe GM's of that era used just an ignition key for the ignition and another key for all the other locks, glove box included. I know there must be owners of my year car, 64, that have the original keys and can verify that either way for me.

I don't know of course what key combination it had of course but the locksmith told me that without a key I wouldn't even be able to get the switch out of the panel. I understand the reason without the key as it takes one to get the tumbler out. I guess that then opens me up to what ever else there is that holds the ignition switch to the dash. So, I guess it means drilling the tumbler out and buying another ignition switch, which are available and aren't too expensive really.

So, I will keep reading the posts here and maybe before I drill, a more definitive explanation will pop up but it seems I am destined to get a new switch. Finding sets of older keys is getting harder to do but wish I had that option. It seems that the ignition key is a square head while the rest of the lock use a round head. Guess GM has been doing this for quite a while.

Thanks for the help so far and I will ask another locksmith to see if I get a different answer to my problem or the same.

Russ

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I had a locksmith literally hand cut a key for me one time. He used a correct blank, a small hand file, and a magnifying glass. With the key blank held in a pair of vice grips, he would wiggle the key in the lock, look for marks using the magnifying glass, and file away. He kept doing this until he had a key made.

When I had a key made for my '64, the lock cylinder in the door had a code stamped on it. Using this code, a locksmith was able to cut me a new key which works perfectly.

Believe Tom when he tells you which years used one or two keys. He knows this stuff forward and backward - works with it every day.

Ed

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It's great reading this since y'day.

When I saw Tom's post about 1 key on '64s I thought "sheesh, my '65 must have had the locks changed" cos why would they go to the inconvenience (?) of two keys...?

then to hear they went back to 2 keys (security? valet key?) in '65 i'm pleased to hear it's as original (not that it's such a big modification if my locks were indeed changed...)

my father in law in Japan actually made a key from scratch for their Toyota Celsior (lower grade LS400) years back.

he's a mad wood worker and decided to do it as a project/hobby. carved the head outta wood, then the key out of steel. at least he had a key to copy tho... I didn't check, but I expect it wouldn't have started the car (only opened it).... unless he also made a chip to go in it...?

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  • 2 years later...
Guest dwhiteside64
If your `64 has the original locks and ignition there should be ONE key for everything. This was a change/feature Buick advertised in the `64 literature. It only lasted one year as the `65`s went back to two keys.

Tom Mooney

I'm thinking about getting some spare keys made for my '64. One of the keys fits the ignition and door locks. I believe the trunk lock has been replaced as it has a different key. Should I get the pearl shaped or hex head blank for the ignition/doors?

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Just did that. If the locks are still all original. Take the Door Lock off and then take it to a locksmith there is a code on the side imprinted, he can look on the internet and find the correct cut to make your key. Remember the Door Lock and the Ignition Lock are the same.

The Glove box lock and the Trunk are the same, however the Trunk has 6 cuts and the glove box only 4, so take the trunk lock out as that will work both, but if you cut off of the glove box, it will work in the glove box but not the trunk, whereas the trunk will open both the trunk and the glove box.

Cost about $15 to cut each original key, duplicates less.

Lastly write down the codes in case you need a new key in the future.

Hopefully you have a vacuum release for the trunk, if not, you will have to remove the back seat and backrest. If you can crawl through, your ok, just turn the bladed extension and it will open. If you cannot crawl through put a piece of flattened 5/16" line and reach from the back seat to release. Tricky, but can be done. Good Luck Paul

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Guest dwhiteside64

I wanted to add that I think I have the original key that still has the punch tab with the number 8570. It is a Briggs & Stratton pearl-shaped key with GM markings as well. Could this code help me find the right tumbler set-up for the trunk?

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I wanted to add that I think I have the original key that still has the punch tab with the number 8570. It is a Briggs & Stratton pearl-shaped key with GM markings as well. Could this code help me find the right tumbler set-up for the trunk?

Darren, if that key works in the ignition and doors then that is the original key code. But your problem is the key does not work in the trunk and you suspect someone has changed the trunk lock, correct? Have a locksmith change the tumblers in your trunk cylinder to match the door and ignition cylinders. He can do so by using the code or by measuring the 6 cuts in your key and arranging the tumblers in the trunk lock cylinder to match. I taught myself to do this and it is not difficult. All that is required is a Curtis key cutter, a code book, a variety of small parts (which I gathered from disassembling extra lock cores from parts cars)...and alot of patience!

Tom Mooney

Edited by 1965rivgs (see edit history)
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Guest dwhiteside64

Hi Tom yes it does work in the ignition and doors. The trunk has a different key all together so the lock has been replaced over time. Thanks for the added information it will be helpful.

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Guest dwhiteside64
I may be way off base here but my 63 & 64 both have different trunk keys.They both look original.T.Nugent...

That is very interesting for sure. Wonder how many others that have the same situation...

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From the factory owners manual - the '63 came with two keys (one for you, and one for your spouse.) The owners manual states that the single key works all four locks - ignition, doors, trunk, and glove box. You may have two keys and they may look different but just for grins take just one of them and try to open all four locks

The '64 owners manual states the same thing. a single key for all locks. I have a reproduction owners manual for it.

If your trunk key is different, it's probably because of something that happened before you took possession of the car.

When I looked at my owners manual, I found that the key code info is in fact entered on the data page at the back of the manual along with the VIN, engine code, transmission code, and other pertinent data to only my car.

Ed

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Guest dwhiteside64

Ok Ed I never thought to check my owners manual, that was a 'duh' moment for me. I will give the keys a try and see if all the locks/ignition work using either one.

Thanks

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Guest Dialtone
Could be a long shot, but in one of my cars, I found two separate hidden sets of keys in two separate hide-a-key magnetic little boxes in the rear of the car on top of the rear portion of the frame near the gas tank.

When I bought my 64 Riv and got it home and went to give it a tune up. I found a hidden key in the engine compartment

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  • 4 years later...

New to forum and have brand new old 63 - so, reading, reading, reading. 

 

No Keys for car. Trunk lock missing. Glove box locked. 

Sounds like I could pull door locks and have keys made based on code or talent of the locksmith.

Earlier post suggests trunk/glove box may be keyed different that doors/ignitiion.

More recent post (2/17/14) suggests single key for all four. This might be ideal for me.

 

If glove box is keyed differently and locked and no trunk tumbler, how does one liberate the unknown contents

of the glove box with damaging things that the mice and moisture have not yet finished their work?

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Research on how to remove door skin. In reality you really don't need to remove it all the way, but if your unfamiliar with the car you probably should. Ther's a 4 number code as has been mentioned on the cylinder.  You can then go to an older locksmith & have him make a copy or take the cylinder with you. Should be in & out in 15 minutes.

 

Tom T.

 

 

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6 hours ago, 1963Riv said:

New to forum and have brand new old 63 - so, reading, reading, reading. 

 

No Keys for car. Trunk lock missing. Glove box locked. 

Sounds like I could pull door locks and have keys made based on code or talent of the locksmith.

Earlier post suggests trunk/glove box may be keyed different that doors/ignitiion.

More recent post (2/17/14) suggests single key for all four. This might be ideal for me.

 

If glove box is keyed differently and locked and no trunk tumbler, how does one liberate the unknown contents

of the glove box with damaging things that the mice and moisture have not yet finished their work?

  You can remove the section of the dash which holds the glovebox and work from the back side to liberate the lock. As Tom says there will be a 4 digit code that converts into the cuts in the original key.

  The `64 cars had only 1 key for all locks. I think this was a change from `63 as the `64 Buick literature talks about the one key system like it was something new for `64. So I am assuming the `63 cars were originally equipped with a two key system. A locksmith can create a one key system by coding all the locks to one pattern no matter what year car you own.

  Dont know if this is a parts car or something you intend to be functional but....what I often find is the door cylinders no longer match the ignition switch tumbler, etc...this can occur due to an ignition switch change in which the entire assembly is swapped out including the tumbler or if someone changes a door skin and forgets to transfer over the original door lock.

  If you cant find a locksmith to service your locks, or have any other questions, send me a PM. I can service all aspects of the lock system on our cars,

Tom Mooney

 

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Look at the data plate on your firewall to see if the code Z4.  If it's so equipped, it has a vacuum release for the trunk. Thete vacuum hose th s under the carpet close to the rocker panel on the passenger's side.  You can provide enough vacuum to activate the release by sucking on it (If you have no other vacuum source.)  You can also access the trunk release through the back seat, if the spare tire is not in the way, and use a really long screw driver to release the trunk.  The trunk key a glove box key are the same on a 63, the ignition and door locks are the same. Makes it nice for valet parking. The valet can enter and drive for car, but not the trunk and glove box.

 

Good luck

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I had no idea about the single key on the 64. I replaced my locks in groups, so I have 3 keys. Any vendors sell a matched set of locks with one key? I can guarantee no one in my area can match tumblers.

 

I've had to open my trunk from the inside, it's an interesting adventure.

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54 minutes ago, jsgun said:

I had no idea about the single key on the 64. I replaced my locks in groups, so I have 3 keys. Any vendors sell a matched set of locks with one key? I can guarantee no one in my area can match tumblers.

 

I've had to open my trunk from the inside, it's an interesting adventure.

Hi Steve,

  I have a matched set put together. If you are interested send me a PM, thanks,

Tom Mooney

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Yes regarding Z4 on plate, No regarding operational. Pulls some vacuum but insufficient. 

Tubing may need to be replace or rear actuator may not be healthy.

Found the cylinder when removing carpet. Pretty cool. With rear lock removed, flat blade works for now. 

 

Thanks for info on dash, will get into that next weekend and see what treasure awaits.

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21 hours ago, RivNut said:

The trunk key a glove box key are the same on a 63, the ignition and door locks are the same. Makes it nice for valet parking. The valet can enter and drive for car, but not the trunk and glove box.

 

Is that so?  Not doubting you (because the Riviera may be different), but I've got a 63 Electra that has one key for everything (doors, trunk, ignition, glove box, and console).

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21 hours ago, RivNut said:

The trunk key a glove box key are the same on a 63, the ignition and door locks are the same. Makes it nice for valet parking. The valet can enter and drive for car, but not the trunk and glove box.

 

 

 My 63 Riviera has that same set up. All of my 63 Pontiacs were keyed this way as well.

 

Bill

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3 minutes ago, Riviera63 said:

 

 My 63 Riviera has that same set up. All of my 63 Pontiacs were keyed this way as well.

 

Bill

It is the same setup for my '63 Riviera. The owner manual talks about "Two keys are provided with your new Buick. Each key operates all locks." (page 35).

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The Buick parts books show one key blank for `36 thru `64 ...the books show 2 key blanks (round and hexagon) for `65-`67. It would seem until `65 there was only one key to open all locks. Perhaps the `64 literature emphasizing a one key system was not something new but a response to a competitor`s offerings? The text that Jan quotes above, along with the parts books, would lead me to believe Buick used a one key system until `65.

Tom Mooney

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