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toronado throttle switch


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Just bought a 66 toronado that is in pretty good shape. The throttle is slow to return to idle position when cold. What is the function of the throttle switch? I suppose my issue can be solved with some wd40 or slightly better return spring but curious of the function of this switch...any ideas appreciated. Also there is a vacuum valve of some.sort at the spot where carb cable comes to idle position...what is that thing?

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I suspect the "idle switch" you've found is for the switch-pitch torque converter, to put the converter's "pitch" at the "high stall" position so as to minimize "creep" in gear at idle. It should not inhibit the throttle linkage's movements in returning to base idle.

There should be another similar switch on the rear of the carb or under the dash panel (one there is actuated by an upper bar from the accel pedal assy. Same thing, moves the converter's pitch to high stall at WOT and also it might be the kickdown switch for the transmission.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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bet i need to replace that switch - hope that's available at o'reilly's...

Don't count on it. My money says they (or any other chain parts store) won't have a clue what you're talking about. I've posted the applications and part #s somewhere, can't remember if here or classicoldsmobile.com. Basically you need a 66-67 Toronado switch, either NOS or good used.

The switch in question is a combination switch for downshift and switch-pitch torque converter vane angle. If the car "creeps" at idle, the torque converter may be stuck in the wrong angle or switch may be misadjusted.

The switch can be adjusted via throttle linkage. 1966 Oldsmobile Chassis Manual shows how.

In the meantime a little WD40 or similar lubricant on all the pivot points will help.

Also- does this car by chance have Cruise Control? That can also affect return to slow idle.

The "vacuum thing" is a slow idle dashpot. It too can affect return to slow idle, and should be adjustable. It can also be done away with entirely with little to no affect on driveability, but if it's survived intact for 45 years...

Highly recommend purchase of a 1966 Olds Chassis Manual. Whether you do the work yourself or hire it out, you will eventually need the procedures and information in the CSM because modern mechanics are guaranteed to be dumbfounded by this car. Toronado section is separate and at the back of the book, though there are some service procedures common to all series.

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Whether you do the work yourself or hire it out, you will eventually need the procedures and information in the CSM because modern mechanics are guaranteed to be dumbfounded by this car.

THEY just think they know what a front wheel drive car looks like under the hood! THEY also possibly thought that Chrysler's LH cars was the only fwd cars with the engine pointing the right direction, plus a few Renaults.

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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Several years back I had the Toronado out one weekend night. Bunch of us car guys had stopped at a friend's service station to hang out and BS a while. A carload of high school boys saw the old iron and pulled in to see- likable bunch of kids, all enrolled in the automotive technician course at the local vo-tech high school.

They wanted to see and hear everything, so I popped the hood on the Toro. They couldn't believe that huge 455. Then someone said "look at the floorboard".

One of 'em finally caught on and said "where's the hump?"

"Doesn't have one- it's front wheel drive" and four teenage jaws dropped.

I showed them how the Toronado worked. They went to school Monday and told their 28 yr old teacher about this wild front wheel drive car they'd seen over the weekend. He basically told them they were full of it, that no one made front wheel drive cars before the 1980s.

The next weekend the boys stopped in again and begged me to bring the car to the VT high school and show their teacher, so I did. Teacher came out and his jaw dropped. "Who built this car?" "Oldsmobile Division, General Motors." "They didn't make front wheel drive cars back then." "Wanna bet?"

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Reckon he's heard of "Cord"??? Much less the Toro-companion Cadillac Eldorados??? Or possibly the Cutlass JetFire?

Unfortunately, it appears this automotive trades instructor is more "instructor" than "automotive enthusiast" or "automotive historian"?

When you took the car up there for them to see, before lifting the hood, what do you reckon their reaction might have been to a front wheel burnout? Just long enough to lay some rubber . . . no more, no less. "For demonstration purposes", only.

Enjoy!

NTX5467

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They got the smoke show "off campus".

One of those kids works with me at the powerplant now. He's a sharp boy and a topnotch operator. He actually wanted Mechanic, but the Operator job came open first and he's taken a liking to their work schedule- he gets 14 days off a month, and he makes side money wrenching on cars on days off.

I need to get the OP the parts apps too, in case he's still with us.

Grp 4.057 p/n 392983- switch, transmission throttle control, 66-67 Toronado except HD trailer usage

p/n 395081- switch, transmission throttle control, 66-67 Toronado HD or trailer usage

Either will work, just the downshift and angle change points are a little different on the trailer switch application. It does have to come from a Toronado. The switch mounting to the engine is different on 88/98/Cutlass.

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