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Does anyone else have a snotty oil breather? I've noticed that my '53 (with no PCV, obviously) has been doing this, especially in the cooler weather. I assume it's because of condensation, since it also drips water from the draft tube after a longer trip as it cools down. It's not really a short trip car, and the oil on the dipstick is fine, and the lower block breather is clean. Just wondering if I'm the only one here with this issue. Nothing smells like anti-freeze or anything. The mesh in the cap collects what looks like snot. It's kind of gross.

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It's a combination of oil vapors and condensate. The oil will look fine, but even the top of the engine's dipstick can get some of the goo on it, too. Certainly more common in cooler times of the year where the vehicle does NOT get driven long enough for the engine to get to full operating temperature AND stay there long enough for the vapors to cook out of the crankcase. It can usually take about 10 highway miles for this to start to happen, by observation. Remember that engine oil temp will generallly follow coolant temp, but NOT as quickly by any means.

I have a 1980 Chrysler with the 360 2bbl V-8. In cooler weather, as the Chry LA block engines run a good deal cooler than the larger B/RB engines, they can be much more prone to oil condensation. In my case, when I see some goo at the upper end of the engine dipstick, I'll probably need to change the PCV hose as it usually has a low spot behind the carb, where the goo can collect and clog the hose, which can result in a flaky idle quality. For that particular car, kind of goes with the territory.

Previously, the local Chrysler dealer had sold some middle-60s Satellites to some elderly ladies in town. They had the LA 318 in them. In the early 1970s, they'd be in to get the intake manifolds removed and cleaned out (carbon buildup due to in-town short trips and such) as their automatic chokes would not release properly (choke thermostat coil in the manifold's exhaust crossover area). It seemed to be quite common for that to happen in that sort of use. Never had that issue with 383s.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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Thanks! It's interesting to hear about the quirks that specific makes and models, and even engines, had. I was just curious because my 60s cars don't have the same issue...however, I do run a 160 stat in the '53, since it's mostly a warm weather car. That may add to the issue.

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Thanks! It's interesting to hear about the quirks that specific makes and models, and even engines, had. I was just curious because my 60s cars don't have the same issue...however, I do run a 160 stat in the '53, since it's mostly a warm weather car. That may add to the issue.

With all due respect a car in warmer climates benefits more from a thermostat than one in colder climates. Put a thermostat in that guy, it will appreciate it in the summer months when the radiator needs adequate time to bring down the coolant temperature.

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