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Q Bond New adhesive to replace JB Weld


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I have found a new metal and plastic adhesive called Q Bond. It is the best and maybe the final product we need to repair broken carbs and generator and starter casings. I have used J B Weld for many years having good luck one time repairing a cracked cylinder head on a modern Plymouth van. BUT this Q bond is crazy. The guys at NAPA got me to buy it back in the Summer. Up here it costs about $20 for this size and $50 for the 'larger'. They said it will hold anything instantly and you CANNOT break the bond. They're right. I see by the package it's made in the States in Paterson N.J.

A couple of weeks ago our central vac quit and I took it apart to fix it. It turned out the motor brushes had worn down to nubs. So I proceded to pull the motor apart and when I do I find I had been just a little too aggresive and had cracked the front motor web in 2 places. I pulled the armature out and took off the brushes and with a long pry bar got the cage/web back to the correct alignment. I then took my Dremel tool and cut about 1'4" down into both cracked webs. I roughed up the smooth cuts and then poured in the Q bond powder and put a drop of the Q Bond liquid on each powder mound. INSTANTLY the mound is as hard as the aluminum web and I cannot scrape any of the Q Bond off. I put in new brushes and the Mrs. thinks I'm a genius, she just doesn't know I broke the motor cage and almost cost us a new motor.

There are 2 bottles of powder and 2 bottles of liquid glue in the box. One of the powders is silver for carb/aluminum repair and the other is black for plastic repair but can be used for metal repair as well. Although it appears you can use the liquid by itself, it makes a far better job,I think, using the powders. I originally bought it to repair the cracks in my KCL steering wheel which I hope to get to this Winter.

You guys might want to look into this stuff as a replacement for JB Weld or any other small repair epoxies.

I forgot what the guys at NAPA had shown me that got me to buy it in the1st place. Besides putting a bit of the powder on a piece of metal sheet and glueing a bolt to it ,head down, which I could NOT move 10 seconds after the liquid hit it,even hitting it with a hammer the metal sheet bent- they took a large rubber O ring and cut it in two and then put the liquid by itself,no powder, on the end of the cut and put the O ring back together. I could not pull it apart 10 seconds later. The O ring would stretch BUT it would not let go. I see on the internet that this is the strongest adhesive available for non commercial use. I believe it.

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Edited by DodgeKCL (see edit history)
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Even better than that ( I am assuming ) is a product made by 3-M called panel bond. It is black and sands fantastic so it will prob match your steering wheel, it can be used with a fiberglass cloth if you like for extra strength. It will stick and repair anything.

Takes 24 hrs to dry ( but you can get it to dry in minutes with a heat gun ) which may sometimes require taping but I have never had a failure from it. Supposedly used to hold pieces of the space shuttle together, used in autobody trade to replace roof skins, quarters frame rails on some cars ect. ect.

Cost is about 30-40 dollars a cartridge and does require a special gun but the cartridge is large and extra tips are cheap enough.

I have coated the outsides of deteriorating pot-metal pieces a few years ago just to give them strength and there are no problems

You cant buy it at Napa, you have to go to an autobody supply store but once you use it you will wonder how you did without it.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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I'd never heard of it either and it looks ideal for a project I'm working on now. Doing a web search I see that there is a similar product called RapidFix. From the YouTube video for Q-Bond and the one for RapidFix they look identical.

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Sounds impressive KCL, did you see my recent post 'water pump'. The problem is that the inside flange has rusted away. Mike C5 replied and said that he doubted that JB weld could be trusted and that cast iron welding / machining would be the way - or get a better pump. No suitable pumps are available here in the U.K. so I wondered if this new stuff could be used on cast iron ie; save my water pump? What do you think?

thanks,

Ray.

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I can't see that cast iron would react any different than steel bolts or steel body metal sheeting. However I have no experience yet on using the Q Bond directly on a surface that something is going to use as a bearing surface. In other words if I were doing your fix I would make a bearing out of a large 2 or 3 penny nail, cut it,bend it and square it on a grinding wheel until it conformed to the collar or sleeve. Then use the Q bond silver powder to hold that to the pump body. I would not run something on the Q bond. At least not something that would spin at water pump speeds and have a thrust spring bearing down on it.

I forgot to mention in my 1st post that you use bits of masking tape as a dam to hold the powder into the space you want to fill. The powder of course wants to run out down the sides of the gap. I used masking tape on the central vac repair as the sides of the gap were square and so the Dremel cuts were open at both ends. The tape was simply peeled off after the Q bond hardened.

I have 2 blister packs of unopened JB Weld still on my tack board. I will still be using JB Weld because it has some uses that a powder can not be used for especially a vertical one. The only problem I have found with JB Weld is the age old problem with all 2 part epoxys. They are all mixed 50/50. How good are you at mixing it? Although it will always harden I've noticed that sometimes if you scrape it, it is very hard and sometimes it's not. Is it mix sensitive? Is it temperature sensitive? I dont' know. But this Q bond isn't mixed. The liquid is simply drizzled on the powder and the powder instantly turns all wet. In the next 5 to 10 seconds it hardens. Unlike JB Weld you cannot put a mark in it with the edge of a screwdriver blade. JB Weld says you can drill and thread it. Have you ever tried that? I have it. It just breaks up. This Q bond does not I suspect because 50% of it is not 'hardener'. Except for the 1% or so of catalyst/glue, it's 99% metal powder which seems to react 100% with the catalyst before temperature has time to be a factor. In fact like all of these space age glues it gets hot during it's curing stage but that passes very quickly. I have since used it to repair a door handle. I cannot 'break' the handle at the break. I will let you know as time goes on what I use it on and how it works. But for the $20 I would add it to my shop.

Edited by DodgeKCL (see edit history)
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Hello Dodge KCL. Thanks for responding to my water pump problem. I will be trying the Q Bond treatment to repair the rusted flange whose purpose, as I understand it, is to enable the impeller to efficiently direct water without the two surfaces actually touching. I would ideally like to find a better

replacement pump to refurbish, rather than throw hundreds of pounds at this poor one. Should the Q Bond not do the job, then I have fabricated a thin, stepped, aluminium flange which could be bolted between the two halves of the pump; however the original flange would first need to be ground off, but in doing this, the positive locating fit of the two halves would be lost and a less accurate mating would have to be accepted. Neither of these options are ideal but whatever works,

will have to be tollerated for the time being.

Will keep you posted,

Cheers,

Ray.

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Thanks for your suggestion DP. I had considered brazing and milling but how do you stop it from building up underneath? if it does, how do you get to it to remove the surplus. I expect suitable machine tools are available but would be costly. I am no expert, so if you can help a home mechanic/engineer with more advise it would be most welcome.

Ray.

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