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1952 Special Deluxe Project


Guest shadetree77

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Guest shadetree77

Did a little work on Lucy over the last few days. I still haven't gotten a chance to get under there and look at the thrust pad/trans mounts. My Dad wants to get under there with me and he has had to work the last few days. Hopefully, we'll get to do that today. I've mostly done little touch-up type things like wrapping wires, re-routing fuel lines, and cleaning up the engine compartment. I think I finally got my automatic choke working. I put the insulation sleeve on the stove pipe. Man, it looks funny under there. I know it came that way from the factory but it sure stands out. I think I might rub a little engine crud on there or something to tone down that bright yellow! The biggest accomplishment was the replacement of my mustache bar. I won a bidding war on one a few months ago. The condition is far from perfect, but it's fine for my driver. As you can see in the pictures, it looks a million times better than the old one! I still haven't found any mustache extensions. I couldn't put the old ones back on without doing something to them. I put a few coats of rust encapsulator on them to fill in some of the pits. Then I roughed them up with some sandpaper and sprayed them with(of all things)that bright silver metallic "Brake Gray" paint from Eastwood. You may remember my disappointment with this stuff from one of my earlier posts. Hey, I've got to get my money out of it somehow!!:D I'm not too happy with it but it looks way better than leaving them the way they were. In the meantime, I'm still on the lookout for some shiny ones.

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The new pieces look great and she is coming along. I believe half the enjoyment of these old cars is finding needed parts and getting things working again. The thrill of successful part hunting. The satisfaction of making work and run. You have a true labor of love and it shows!

Where did you get the stove pipe covering for the choke?

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Guest shadetree77

Thanks guys. I've replaced 98% of the bad chrome with shiny, driver-quality pieces. I just need those elusive extensions to have 100%. Chris, I agree. I do enjoy the hunt! Most of my stuff has been won on EBAY and it's always a thrill to come out on top in a bidding war. Especially when the item in question is particularly hard to find(such as that mustache bar). Keith is right though. If you are patient and know when to place a bid, you can get some really good deals on EBAY. By the way, I took a picture of that stove pipe sleeve. I got it from CARS. It came out looking kind of white in the picture AND it's plainly white in the CARS.COM picture, but I assure you, it's BRIGHT YELLOW!! They sell it by the foot. It's no longer made with asbestos. They use something called "Aramid" fiber that's heat resistant up to 1100 degrees. You can check it out here: Choke Stove Pipe Insulator

On to today's little update. My Dad and I jacked up the car and crawled under to check out the thrust pad and trans. mount. It doesn't look any worse than before but it IS in bad shape. They are both missing some big chunks and crumble when you touch them. They definitely need to be replaced. I just don't know if they are the source of my shift linkage alignment problem. They don't seem to be missing a significant enough amount of material to allow my engine and trans to move. I could be wrong about that. Maybe it doesn't take very much to affect it. In any case, I found out today that if I put the shift lever in reverse and hold it there, the car has reverse. If I let it go the trans. begins jumping wildly from reverse to low! The car does fine in drive though and I COULD NOT RESIST taking her a few miles down the road!! I know I shouldn't have, but I just couldn't stand it anymore! My Dad and I cleaned all of the yellow pine pollen off of the windows and hopped in for a ride. We just went down to the closest gas station and turned around but man it was fun! We passed an old feller in a '50 Ford pickup and he was rubbernecking so hard I thought he was gonna' put his old truck in the ditch! Must have been the sun shining off that mustache bar!:cool::D:D Anyway, I thought of something I wanted to ask you guys about. I recently replaced my steering wheel. During the course of that replacement, we were smacking the mounting stud of the steering column with a hammer to loosen the old wheel. Could this have jarred something loose in the steering column shift linkage area and thrown everything off??

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Edited by shadetree77 (see edit history)
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Thanks for the link and picture Robert. I can't say much about the trans issue. I would say the is probably a spot on the linkage where the length can be adjusted. I have seen this on Buicks a few years newer than yours. You might be on to something as well concerning the thrust mounts.

And yea, if I go and just start the car for the week to keep the battery up I can't help myself either. I got to take her out! I bet the guy in the 50 Ford was rubber necking. Your car is a sleeper. :-) Sleepers always amaze people.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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Guest shadetree77

Well, I finally did it guys. I gave in. I finally called in a mechanic. I've had this car for exactly a year this month. I have been tinkering with the brakes since day one. Some of you may even remember my brake problems being one of my very first posts. I never did get them to work right. They kind of took a back seat to some of the other problems that crept up over the last year, but recently having solved those problems, I went back to the brakes. I have replaced, rebuilt, and adjusted everything in the entire braking system. Some things more than once! My Dad and I added it up. We have put somewhere around $200 worth of brake fluid through the lines bleeding it over and over. Anyway, after another whole day of tightening fittings, checking for leaks, adjusting, and bleeding, bleeding, and bleeding some more we finally threw in the shop towel! I went to visit a local mechanic that has a shop that specializes mainly in 50's Chevy's but will work on almost anything. I really hate to hand my Buick off to someone that I don't know but I have done everything in my power to fix these d@$! brakes! I know I'm probably overreacting, but man I'm worried about old Lucy! I hate that helpless feeling you get when you take your car to a mechanic. I'm also disappointed that I've been defeated by one of the most simple mechanical systems on the car! They are supposed to begin work on it tomorrow. He said they are going to start from the beginning and go through the entire brake system checking everything as they go. I hope they can figure it out because it has kept me stumped for a year now even with all of the help from this forum. I'll check back with you guys when Lucy comes home.

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I think you're doing the right thing too. 50's Chevs brakes are much the same as your car, so the guys should be able to debug yours just fine. Since your life and the lives of others are at stake, the brakes should be the best they can.

I do sympathise about handing your baby over to someone else though, I'd feel the same way!

Keith

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Guest shadetree77

Thanks for the kind words and encouragement guys. No word from the mechanic today. Yeah, I was lucky to find somebody willing to work on it locally. I just hope they do good work at a fair price. I've never had any work done by them. I've stopped in and talked to the owner a few times before to get advice on some Buick stuff. A lot of the parts on Buicks and Chevys are similar so he helped me out with some advice a few times. I figured taking it there was better than taking it to a regular mechanic. They should be used to working on old brakes. Keith, I know what you mean about the brakes being so important. I've driven it several times and didn't feel very safe any of those times. The best I've ever gotten out of the brakes was probably about a 1/4 pedal. Scary stuff in stop and go traffic! Now that I'm finally ready to start driving it around on a regular basis, I really need those brakes to function like they're supposed to! Hopefully, they'll call me and give me an update today. If not, I'll call them Thursday morning. Until then, I'm trying not to think about what all could go wrong while they work on my Buick!!:(

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Talk about brakes..................in the 50's dad was a Buick dealer, the building was a two story, with a big concrete ramp that went up to the shop area. Every night all CARS had to be inside, so some that didn't run had to be pushed. Well, you would take the wrecker, WOOD BUMPER, push the car, get it going fast, let up on the gas at the bottom of the ramp, and let the speed carry the car up the ramp.

One evening I was the wrecker driver, I was probably 16, and my brother was the driver of the car, he was 15. I didn't know that the car had a note on the steering wheel that said, NO BRAKES........, well my brother thought I knew such, but I didn't, so I pushed FAST, he was waving like crazy, I thought he wanted more speed, so he got it. UP THE RAMP HE WENT, AND HEADING FOR THE BACK WALL. Understand it was a TWO STORY building and if he went though the wall it was a 14-16 foot drop. Lucky for ALL that day the shop received 12 drums of oil, and they were three rows wide, 4 drums deep, so when he hit them, they slid, and he came to a stop when the drums bumped the wall. First couple drums were dented, but NONE LEAKED, and WE both counted our blessings.

.

Brakes are important,,,,,,,lol

Dale in Indy

Edited by smithbrother (see edit history)
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Guest shadetree77

It's been a week now since the mechanic picked up my car. I called last Thursday and was told they would call me back. As of today, I had received no call. My Dad stopped in there after work today. The Buick had not been touched. He was told they would look at it "today or tomorrow", which is what they told me when they picked it up a week ago. I also talked to a guy that had his carburetor re-built there. He said it took them 3 months! Hmmmm....starting to get a little MORE nervous about this whole thing but what choice do I have? I'll just have to wait and try to be patient.:mad::(

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Sad, WHY, OH WHY do so many shops OVER PROMISE, UNDER PRODUCE?

Many just DON'T know how to speak the TRUTH, and say for example, "WE ARE A WEEK BEHIND, WE WILL DO OUR BEST TO WORK YOU IN, AND IF YOU WANT TO LEAVE THE CAR, WE WILL GIVE YOU GOOD SERVICE AS SOON AS WE CAN".

I wish you well, but understand why you have concerns.

Dale in Indy

P.S. The last thing you ever want to tell a shop is, I'M IN NO HURRY........that gives them the ok to push everyone ahead of you.

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Guest shadetree77
The last thing you ever want to tell a shop is, I'M IN NO HURRY........that gives them the ok to push everyone ahead of you.

Too late for me on that front. The day I went in there to talk to the guy, that's the FIRST thing he asked me. It was in a completely nonchalant way and at the time I paid it no mind. However, looking back I DID tell him I wasn't in a hurry!:eek: Crap......Oh well, not much I can do but wait. It's not like I have any other choices. I'm just not used to this whole mechanic thing. I can probably count the times I've used a mechanic in my life on one hand and still have 2 fingers left. I've always done everything myself. If I didn't know how, I'd read up on it and tear into it anyway. My Dad called me a few minutes ago and gave me some more details on his visit. He said the owner was pretty rude about the whole thing. Pretty much told him they'd look at it soon and turned around and walked off leaving my Dad there in mid-sentence. On his way out, he heard the owner's sons(it's a family-run business)talking to each other about how short-handed they were and how their Dad wouldn't hire anyone. This just gets better and better folks.:(

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They should have scheduled the car when time permitted for the car to be diagnosed on the day scheduled. Diagnosing a cars problems at their leisure is not the way to do business. Effectively you have lost a week that could have possibly been utilized for other items on the car that need attention. In good faith you dropped your vehicle off only to find it sitting in the same spot where you left it. To be sure, your dad dropped a bug in his ear and perhaps the car will be looked at this week. If not find another garage. Brakes and brake systems are not much different over the years. The theory and application remain consistent. That said, call to other shops and inquire with the mechanic if he would and can repair your brakes. Worst they can say is no. BTW, what is wrong with the brakes anyway?

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Guest shadetree77
They should have scheduled the car when time permitted for the car to be diagnosed on the day scheduled. Diagnosing a cars problems at their leisure is not the way to do business. Effectively you have lost a week that could have possibly been utilized for other items on the car that need attention.

EXACTLY!! That's a major part of my frustration. There are a LOT of things I would have worked on if my car hadn't been sitting at their shop. They should have been up front with me about their workload. Instead, they told me "today or tomorrow" and all but sprinted out to my house to pick the car up. That's part of the reason I'm so confused. Why were they so fast and eager to come and get it if they knew they couldn't work on it? Maybe they were afraid of losing the job? Who knows? As for what is wrong with the brakes, I wish I knew! They have been a problem since day one and I've spent hours upon hours(not to mention dollars)on them and they still aren't right. I exhausted the opinions and advice of the forum here on a lengthy post trying to figure out what is wrong. You name it, I've replaced, adjusted, and/or re-built it. In some cases numerous times. Here's a link to that old post:http://forums.aaca.org/f115/my-wits-end-52-special-brakes-303338.html . Finding another shop might not be so easy either as Lamar alluded to above. Most shops give you a blank stare when you tell them your car is a 1952. Usually accompanied by the phrase, "I don't know anything about that. That thing was built before I was born!". Not exactly something that inspires confidence in the quality of their work.

Edited by shadetree77 (see edit history)
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Guest Peter Bird

Frustrating stuff, waiting for these guys, hey? I had a car in a workshop for 134 days before they repaired it. I ended up buying another car to use while I waited for them to fix the one in the shop. They tell you one thing, promise another. But she's looking damned good. I am jealous as hell.

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EXACTLY!! That's a major part of my frustration. There are a LOT of things I would have worked on if my car hadn't been sitting at their shop. They should have been up front with me about their workload. Instead, they told me "today or tomorrow" and all but sprinted out to my house to pick the car up. That's part of the reason I'm so confused. Why were they so fast and eager to come and get it if they knew they couldn't work on it? Maybe they were afraid of losing the job? Who knows? As for what is wrong with the brakes, I wish I knew! They have been a problem since day one and I've spent hours upon hours(not to mention dollars)on them and they still aren't right. I exhausted the opinions and advice of the forum here on a lengthy post trying to figure out what is wrong. You name it, I've replaced, adjusted, and/or re-built it. In some cases numerous times. Here's a link to that old post:http://forums.aaca.org/f115/my-wits-end-52-special-brakes-303338.html . Finding another shop might not be so easy either as Lamar alluded to above. Most shops give you a blank stare when you tell them your car is a 1952. Usually accompanied by the phrase, "I don't know anything about that. That thing was built before I was born!". Not exactly something that inspires confidence in the quality of their work.

They don't know? Interesting. In the late 80's early 90's when I was spinning wrenches for Goodyear a extremely beautiful lady with a 66 Impala would purchase tires and service at my store. I did everything on this 66 from brakes, carb, tune up, tires, shocks and alignments. The car was built in 66. I was born in 65. Bendix drum brakes have not changed much in decades. Same theory and design. Simply silly. I was reading the Avanti restoration thread. Posted were pictures of the drum brakes. Look like any drum brake I have seen for years and through the decades. When I get a chance I will read your brake thread.

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Well....sort of. After I put in the new mc rebuild kit the pedal no longer faded during the mc test and after bleeding some more I had a little more pedal than I started with. I also found a small leak under the car at the junction block where the two back lines split off which I fixed. After this, I adjusted my brakes out a little bit more and adjusted the pedal linkage out some and got it up to about half pedal which is enough to stop the car pretty well. Its far from perfect and I think I need to do some adjusting on my anchor pins in the near future which may just give me a full pedal. I'm currently re-building/replacing the gas tank and fuel system so the brakes are on the back burner for the moment. The guy I bought it from apparently never drained the old gas out before he dumped some new fuel in and started it up after it sat for 30-40 years because the gas I got out of this tank was the color of sorghum molasses!! I can't believe the old girl was actually running on that crap! It finally caught up to her though. My fuel lines are completely clogged. Dropping the gas tank tomorrow to see if it's salvageable. Anyway, I'll check back when I make those anchor pin adjustments to let you know how it went.

Reading the thread I think you have done all that can be done. Two things grabbed me as I read. The wheel cylinders in the front are the correct bore size? These do the most braking. Larger bore provide more surface area for brake fluid to push on thus providing greater braking friction. The adjustment to the shoes are very snug in the rear and very lightly drag in the front? The rear shoes, if the MC is working correctly, provide the stiffer peddle feel. I believe your MC is working as designed. You have a stiff peddle when the hole are plugged. The material used on the shoe is the next question. Back in the day it was asbestos filled gravel glued with God knows what that was great for friction creating heat and stopping power. Today's braking material is metallic flakes that last a good long time but do not produce the friction like materials of old. Many complained about the new material having less braking ability. However, over time this material does produce good heat friction which is what really stops a car. It also helps having power brakes with these types of shoes having the metallic material. Also remember you are stopping a #4000 plus vehicle. I would check one other thing on the shoes and that is the width. Are these shoes the correct width for the drum? At this point I believe you said you have half peddle and would say the car is stopping(all two tons of it) as designed but you are looking for a firmer peddle? If so and your peddle is firm even at half of the travel it is now an adjustment issue. I would concentrate in that area. Adjust the rear shoes until you feel plenty of drag. Seems odd but it creates a firm peddle. The shoes will settle in. The front shoes should have a very light drag. If these have heavy drag it sometimes produces a pull when braking. Sometimes the most tricky of the adjustments so the car does not pull under heavy braking. This is all I can offer from your thread on the brakes. One thing is for certain...you have done all that can be done with the MC and related fluid filled parts.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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I know you HATED having to call on someone else to work on your Buick, I understand such FULLY....

I suggest that when any of us ask for help, that we ask for the answer to this question: "WHAT KIND OF A TIME TABLE SHOULD I EXPECT FROM YOUR SERVICE SHOP?" Then it would be wise to give them a NOT TO EXCEED FINISH DATE. My customers ask this of me all the time, and it doesn't offend me in the least. Both parties need this, IMO.

I feel for you, and sure hope it all works out for the best, it probably will.

Dale in Indy

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Robert

Go get your car! As far as getting someone to work on old cars there are two mentalities: one, they don't want it in their shop disassembled and waiting on parts (justifiable); two, they think that since it is old you don't deserve the same commitment as the local plumber's work truck. Vehicles that sit at a shop get damaged and parts go missing. I once had a dynaflow at shop for 2 months and when I finally got pissed enough to go get it I found it on the scrap pile in pieces. If they already have an "attitude" over the first inquiry in a week, then they should not be the ones to work on it.

Willie

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I agree with Willie. Reading your thread on the brakes it looks like you have a good pedal although at half mast when pressure from the old foot is applied. I'm thinking you need to tinker with the shoe adjustment and maybe the adjustable rod at the master. More importantly, if you do have a good pedal and hold pressure the shoes need to get worked in. Specifically if the material is semi-metallic.

The question is: When you stand on the brakes...I mean really stand on them with all you got...does she stop or coast to a stop at her leisure? If she noses in when you are standing on them then your brakes are good. I will say if I lean on my Buick's brakes she will nose in and stop with certainty.

And, I drive my Buick much differently than my KIA. The Buick is 2 tons of fun with 4 pounds of brake pressure to stop her. I drive the car knowing that stopping on a dime is not in the cards for this Buick. One car length for every 10 mph you are cruising. :)

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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Robert;

I just wanted to add that I agree, that if nothing is forthcoming in the next number of days, take it to another shop. This stuff annoys me to no end, when someone promises a timeline and doesn't even come close. To be fair to the guys at the shop, not everything goes according to plan, and delays can happen which screws up other customer's work.

The other guys are right, in that drum brakes are pretty much the same throughout the years, ask around and see if you can get a recommendation from someone you know as to who in your area runs a fair and honest shop, and go talk to them.

Ultimately, it's your car, your choice, your money at stake.

I wish you well in your search for better brakes!

Keith

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Guest shadetree77

The cylinders are the right size all the way around. That was one of the things I double checked back then. I also adjusted the shoes just like you described. I also adjusted the pedal linkage to the specs. in the service manual. The brake shoes are the new material. I have read many posts on here about the newer material being too hard resulting in less braking power, but I didn't think that would result in excessive pedal travel so I didn't change them. They are the correct width though. As a matter of fact, I had to send the first set back to get the correct size after Rockauto.com sent me the wrong ones. The car does nose dive if you stand on the brakes but the pedal goes much too far down before the brakes begin to engage. By the way, I no longer have a half-pedal either. I sent my MC off to get it re-sleeved(there were pits in the bore)and when I got it back and put it back on I only had 1/4 pedal. I also put a new brake light switch on and bled and bled and bled. After all this, I had almost NO pedal at all and I couldn't get the air out of the lines. Huge amounts of air were entering the lines somewhere but I had no fluid leaks. It was at this point that I gave up and called in the mechanic. After a year of trouble, I was sick of working on the brakes. I just decided that instead of spending all my money on brake fluid, I would spend it on a mechanic! So as you can see, not only do I have the original problem(whatever it may be), but now there are a few more problems added to it.

As for going to get the car, I'm going to give them 4 or 5 more days. I do realize that things don't always go as planned in a shop so I'm going to give them a while longer. If they haven't touched it in almost two weeks, as Willie said I'll probably be pissed enough to go get it! The crappiest part about this is that I had planned on taking her to her first car show on Sunday. There's a local church having a small car show and I thought it would be a good one to attend being so close to home. Ahh, well. Unless that shop gets on the ball, it looks like I'll be missing that one.

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I can understand your frustration after a year of tinkering. Where the huge amount of air getting into the system and no leaks is certainly a mystery. I would attempt to isolate each wheel cylinder one by one to find which one is pulling air. I hope the shop brings her in soon for you.

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Guest shadetree77

My Dad drove by the shop today around 1:30. The Buick was nowhere to be seen and all the bay doors were closed. I'm hoping this is a good sign....either that or someone stole my car!:eek: Let's hope it's the former.

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Robert, Don't get too frustrated! I took my car to a shop that specialized in antique repairs, with high recommendations, to get my Dynaflow rebuilt. Dropped it off in March...didn't get it back until middle of August. Kept checking on it as it sat in the fenced in lot outside the shop..yep, still there..finally, called and said I needed it for a car cruise (Woodward Dream Cruise in Detroit) and lo and behold, they got it done within a week. Not sure what took them so long, maybe they had bread and butter jobs like Chevy's and Ford's that they could whack out quickly, but, they did get it done with a little pushing and it worked fine. Good luck with the wait. Hopefully they had your car in and it is finished already. Good luck.

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Good news is, I got my car back today. Bad news is, it's not fixed. I called the shop this morning and they told me my car had been "done" since last week. They lost my number and couldn't call me....:mad:. So I went down to pick it up and when I got in it the brakes were virtually non-existent. I went back in and told the owner. He drove it around the block and parked it out back by his shop. He agreed that they were still not right. One of his mechanics came out and said he needed to adjust the shoes out some more. While he was doing this I talked to the owner a bit and then looked around the shop area. The owner told me that the reason I couldn't get the air out of the lines was that there were metal shavings in my master cylinder from where I had it sleeved and they were blocking the holes in there. Apparently, the place I had it sleeved didn't bother to clean it out very well. So they cleaned it out and bled a massive amount of air out of the lines and did a little adjusting which resulted in about a 1/4 pedal. Same thing I started with! He also told me that the shoes looked like they were slightly out of center with the drums. I told him about the anchor pin adjustment and he said he had never heard of that. He also told me that I needed to drive the car so that the shoes "break in" to the drums. So at that point, I had two choices. Give them back my car and let them try to fix it with limited knowledge or take it back and do some more anchor pin adjusting myself. After what I saw around the shop and talking to the owner and his mechanic, I decided I would be better off working on it myself. I kind of got the impression they don't really do restoration type work much. Mostly hot rods. He kept trying to tell me how I would be much better off putting disc brakes and power steering on it. If I wanted something that drove like a new car, I would buy a new car. I got this Buick so I could keep it original and experience what it was like to drive it back in the 50's. I didn't try to explain that to him though. I just kind of smiled and nodded. So, that was a $130 bust. I brought Lucy home and the battle of the brakes continues. We're going to start with adjusting the anchor pins again. Maybe I missed something the first time around. Oh well, live and learn right?

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Sorry to hear that Robert. I felt you did everything right and the pedal you had will be as best as it could be. She dropped her nose when you stand on the brake pedal. I was confident you had all the air bled from the system. Drive the car and let the shoes settle in. Let the auto adjusters do their thing. Someauto adjusters work when you apply the brake hard while driving in reverse. Some adjust when the parking brake is applied. I don't know what system you have but apply the parking brake repeatedly about ten times. Then drive the car in reverse and apply the brakes hard. Do this a few times. This will cover the two ways auto adjusters work. Hopefully one of the methods will firm your pedal a bit more.

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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Robert;

Sorry to hear that they didn't get it right for you, though the getting the issue with the master cylinder solved (hopefully!) might be worth the cost.

I'm thinking that the problem is likely related to adjustment, though, in my experience the anchor pin rarely needs adjustment, but if you have concerns about it, go through the procedure to make sure it's right.

A mistake I have made in the past is backing the shoes off too much, they need to be still scuffing the drums to be tight enough to give a good high pedal.

Also, I've never seen self adjusters on these cars, they need to be set up properly by hand, ie., the hard way, not with the emergency brake, or by backing up. Not sure when this feature was added, either late fifties, or early sixties.

Hope this helps, and keep us posted on your progress.

Keith

Edited by Buicknutty
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Guest shadetree77
getting the issue with the master cylinder solved (hopefully!) might be worth the cost.

That's what I've been telling myself so as not to get too angry over paying them and still having braking issues. At least they did fix something! They also kept me from having to spend more time bleeding those darn things so that was worth the price right there!:P I doubt messing with the anchor pins again will yield any results, but you never know. It's worth a try at this point. Before I do that, I'm going to go around and check the adjustments on all of the wheels to make sure they are dragging a little. There's no telling what they did in that shop. I believe the manual says something about having a good "two-hand drag" on them. I've been through all of this before, but hopefully I'll have better luck this time with my re-sleeved master cylinder. Last time I messed with all of this was before having that done.

By the way, I need to take one of my wiper arms off. The whole arm, not just the blade. Does anybody know how it comes off? The manual doesn't say. Do you just pull on it? I can't see any clips or anything but I didn't want to yank on it without asking first. I believe the spring inside the arm has broken and I need to replace it.

Edited by shadetree77 (see edit history)
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Robert;

I've always found wiper arms tricky to get off, but it is quite simple. You push down on the wiper arm on the inside (ie., the part towards the middle of the car, where the blade is), and then gently pull the arm up and off. Its' kind of tough, as you have do the push/pull thing at the same time, but it works.

Keith

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Guest shadetree77

We've been working on the car a bit for the last few days. Got the oil changed and did some adjusting on all four wheels today. I adjusted them all out to give me a good two-handed drag. Didn't really help though. It gave me a miniscule amount of pedal. You still have to cram the pedal all the way to the floor to get it to stop. Well, almost all the way. It hovers around 3 to 4 inches from the floor. Just don't understand what's going on here.:mad::mad: Despite my crappy brakes, I have managed to get her out on the road a few times. I have to be careful and leave plenty of room to stop but nonetheless, I'm having a blast driving her! My Dad and I took it to town and ran some errands in it. I drove her to work last night. Then today, after adjusting the brakes we drove it down to a small gas station that just re-opened under a new name in town. They have ethanol free gas!! I was excited when I drove by the place a few days ago and saw the big sign by the road proclaiming "Ethanol Free Fuel Sold Here". Until now, the nearest station was about 15-20 miles away. You sure do pay extra for it though. I think I paid about 30 cents more per gallon versus the 10% ethanol stuff. I'm supposed to be going to a car show in the morning. I'm thinking about taking Lucy up there if the weather holds out. There's a 50% chance of rain and since my original fuel/vacuum pump is sitting in my garage, I currently have non-functioning wipers!!:eek: Either way, I'll get plenty of pictures and post them on here sometime this weekend. Have a good one guys!!

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Here in Canada we have many stations that display "May Contain up to 10% Ethanol", so this is really confusing to the consumer, as does it does it not have Ethanol in it? I don't know, maybe one week it does and the next week it doesn't?

I still find myself rather puzzled by your braking issues, I wish I wasn't so far away, as I wish I could get my hands dirty trying to help you out.

Make sure that they aren't too tight so that they drag, try feeling the wheels after you've driven the car a few miles, if they are hot, you've got them a bit tight, back them off a notch or two at a time.

I am wondering if the linings need to seat themselves to the drums, see what happens with some careful driving, they may come in better.

Otherwise, I'm glad to hear you're driving it, that's what its' all about, as far as I'm concerned!

Keith

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