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RICK YOUNG

3 THINGS I'VE LEARNED NOT TO DO

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Never use a bumper jack on the rear bumper of a 74 LeSabre and think you can stop the car from rolling forward after the back tire gets off the ground. Even when you grab the bumper jack with your hand and try and hold it back, the car just rolls very slowly and pins your hand between the jack and the tail light lens. Ouch.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Re-Read Trimacar's Post ( #2 ) about an early car's electrical system and your (my) PACEMAKER.

--the shortest path to ground, for what I was told was maybe 20,000 volts, was dierectly from my right hand to my left hand, DIRECTLY THROUGH MY now 4-year-old PACEMAKER , at least for several seconds, after which I accomplished human flight, at least to the northern wall of Joe's garage.

The Cardiologist determined that my pacemeker was inoperable. The subsequent replacement revealed that, not only had the incident "fried" the circuitry in the pacemeker, but had also burned the insulation off the wires into the Atrium and Ventricular portions of my heart, both of which were necessary to regulate my heartbeat which would otherwise often slow to 20 beats / minute, and sometimes just stop. The heart muscle was also cauderized where the wires attached to the heart. The existing wires could not be removed without the possibility of inverting the heart, and were left in place. New wires were inserted, along with the implant of a new pacemaker which gave seven years of additional service.

As an aside, the new pacemaker, having outlived its useful life in 2009, was again replaced, but the newest proceedure resulted in infection, and the site would not heal -- SOOOO -- just before Hershey time, I went under the knife yet again, this time with a laser to remove the new pacemaker, its related sutures and staples, and the pairs of wires from both 2002 and 1998. Brand new wires were inserted on the opposite side of my chest into the heart, along with another new pacemaker (now my 4th one) was implanted, and is still operational. QUOTE]

Marty, THAT is an amazing story! I hope you at least got salvage rights to all that old copper wire...

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Dont trust your car with a manual trans on a slanted driveway.

Also applies to an automatic. At break time I watched the hotdog wagon from 7 floors up on a construction site gently bump into my 66 Impala, which popped out of gear and rolled down the road towards that skinny underpass by the new Hershey museum and Hershey Park. Luckily no cars were coming as it went down the middle of the road, around a corner and stopped in the middle of the underpass without a scratch.

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Don,

Ref: My Pacemaker,

Unfortunately the HMO and Medtronics who manufactured the pacemaker insisted on having it back for evaluation following the episode-----

I told them I'd rather give them Five Bucks as a "Core Charge"

By the way, the Glidden Tour is based in Brenham, TX next October, and hosted by friends --- is that anywhere near McKinney? We plan to drive it, having missed several due to my wife's job.

Edited by Marty Roth
typo (see edit history)

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Never place the palm of your hand over the carb of an engine, while someone is trying to start it, to see if it has sufficient air draw. A subsequent back fire through the carb can turn that hand into a hamburger - WELL DONE!speechless-smiley-012.gif

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Replacing a collapsed hydraulic valve lifter on our 1969 Pontiac Tempest (a 4-door Custom "S", with most of the GTO Ride and Handling options), I had the intake manifold off but was having trouble pulling the lifter which had worn through from the cam. - late, late at night, and just could not get a grip on it.

I decided to bump the engine over with the starter so that bad lifter would sit higher off the block, and I might be able to grip it with a pliers or vise-grip. As I turned the key to bump the starter, gas sgushed from the fuel line toward the removed carburetor, hitting the now energized distributor. The spark from the distributor ignited the gas, starting a fire. Bad enough that my precious Pontiac had an engine fire, but it was sitting in the garage of our 2-story home, right below our 2 children, fast asleep in their bedrooms.

I used both 10 lb dry chemical extinguishers, but the flames kept starting again.

It seemed an eternity waiting for the garage door opener, and I had to move two other cars out of the driveway so thay I could push the Pontiac out from under the bedrooms with flames shooting up to the garage ceiling.

The gas finally stopped pumping, and one more extinguisher finally killed the blaze.

When I think of what could have happened -- the kids, the house, us.....

It just didn't occur to me at 2 o'clock in the morning, that bumping the starter would shoot gasoline at a live distributor and start a fire under my kids' bedroom.

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Marty,

Brenham is 50 Miles NW of Houston. Its a beautiful city with the Famous Blue Bell Ice Cream Factory in it. During the spring (if it rains) the wildflowers are great in that area. You will have fun.

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Bill,

Thanks - we've visited Brenhan before, when VMCCA hosted their first Heritage Tour based in Giddings, years ago.

My grandson Nathan and I drove our 1934 Buick, visited the Blue Bell Ice Cream factory and tasting room, Washington on the Brazos, and many other local area sites. It was a springtime tour, and the Texas Bluebonnets were in full bloom.

We also visited President Lyndon Johnson's boyhood home, the LBJ Library, Pres. G. H. W. Bush's Library , the many wonderful sites in Austin, and some back roads that are just right for touring in old cars.

Our dear friends, Jamie and Pat Crandall are hosting the Glidden Tour October 21 - 26, 2012, based in Brenham, and they are encouraging Brass and Model-T vehicles.

We'll do our best to oblige, hopefully driving our 1914 Buick B-37 Touring.

Of course all pre-1943 vehicles are welcome

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post-54863-143138717445_thumb.jpg

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Never ask your wife to get in the car and rev the engine in gear to locate the source of a rattle when the car is jacked up by the FRONT wheels.

Luckily, that day she was smarter than me......

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In Autoshop class a few decades ago the teacher assigned another vocational student and I the task of finding out why a newly rebuilt and installed '54 Buick engine would not turn completely over. After discussing and trying a few different things we put the car on the lift and pulled the oil pan off. The trouble was easily found with a drop light. A 10'' 3/8 drive extension was riding between two of the connecting rods. So a count your tools class was started the next day by the student that left the extension in the engine. Per the teacher's request.

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In Autoshop class a few decades ago the teacher assigned another vocational student and I the task of finding out why a newly rebuilt and installed '54 Buick engine would not turn completely over. After discussing and trying a few different things we put the car on the lift and pulled the oil pan off. The trouble was easily found with a drop light. A 10'' 3/8 drive extension was riding between two of the connecting rods. So a count your tools class was started the next day by the student that left the extension in the engine. Per the teacher's request.

Along the same lines-- Never leave a socket in close proximity to a fan on a running engine, when it becomes air born after falling in the fan blade it can catch you just above the eye and cause the need for several stitches.

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3 THINGS I'VE LEARNED NOT TO DO: nah, don't believe it, I'm still getting burned, bruised, blinded, gagged, smoked, lacerated, deafened...and that was just this week.

Willie

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All of these are "Ouch"!

I need a nap.

Have't heard yours yet Mike. Or are you savin them all for a book. :)

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I rarely hurt myself (other than neck strains from looking UP at an oil pan on my lift).

The most important thing I have learned is that I will always do things twice.

ALWAYS. Damn, it's frustrating just thinking about it.

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The most important thing I have learned is that I will always do things twice.

ALWAYS.

Everything must be fixed twice as good then. :)

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3 THINGS I'VE LEARNED NOT TO DO: nah, don't believe it, I'm still getting burned, bruised, blinded, gagged, smoked, lacerated, deafened...and that was just this week.

Willie

I ressemble that remark! ;) Dandy Dave!

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Everything must be fixed twice as good then. :)

Naw man. After that it's fixed good enough. ;)

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Oh man, some of those stories made me cringe.....

Never drop bolts near an open distributor hole while working on your car. Cause you know any bolt or part you drop is going down that hole....:eek:

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Never adjust your seat while driving and coming to a stop. DUH-OOPS!

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Never pull half your fully loaded rig with the 20' tilt bed (aka low riding) dual axel trailer onto the shoulder of the road where the road drops off 1.5 feet.

Or if you do, have a Heavy duty forklift nearby.

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Never ask a friend to open their door to help guide you while backing up when the snow is 5’ high alongside the road. And if you do make sure you have some wire handy to reattach the door that has been ripped off and is now stuck in the snow bank.

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Never tow a 16 ft boat 100 miles to the Chesapeake Bay behind your 1964 Cadillac without remembering to put the nut on the tow ball. Dad towed the boat. At the Bay he opened the trunk of the Caddy to retrieve the fishing gear and there sat the nut in the trunk. How the ball stayed on the hitch down I83, around Baltimore and across the Bay Bridge still amazes me. Rust apparently is not always a bad thing.

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