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Need help with restoration


1940_Dodge
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Put them under the suspension, not the drums. You don't want to possibly flat spot the drums.

The last owner had it sitting on the drums for over 30 years, was he in the wrong? I was thinking maybe the metal was firm enough that it wasn't a problem.

** edit, how would I be able to check if there are flat spots on them now? In order to get it on the flatbed we had to hammer the drums to free them up and spray a good amount of WD40 in there, but even after all of that it still was hard to spin the wheel.

Edited by 1940_Dodge (see edit history)
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Look up "runout gauge" and find one of those....or you can make one very easily with a small digital camera tripod. Basically, it's a stick anchored to a base. Put it next to the drum as you turn it and if the drum wobbles, you have a bent drum or a flat spot.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Look up "runout gauge" and find one of those....or you can make one very easily with a small digital camera tripod. Basically, it's a stick anchored to a base. Put it next to the drum as you turn it and if the drum wobbles, you have a bent drum or a flat spot.

Hey thanks for all your help keiser. When you say the drum wobble, do you mean the drum flat spot will cause the tripod to wobble?

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Hey thanks for all your help keiser. When you say the drum wobble, do you mean the drum flat spot will cause the tripod to wobble?

No. I mean if the drum is warped or flat you will be able to see the drum wobble as the tripod/stick are steady.

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Maybe the car should not have been stored on the drums, however unless it is VERY heavy or the kids were jumping up and down in it they should be fine.

The reason of storing a car on blocks is to take the weight off of the suspension. I am wondering the reasoning of this method of storage.

I would put the blocks under the frame.

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Maybe the car should not have been stored on the drums, however unless it is VERY heavy or the kids were jumping up and down in it they should be fine.

The reason of storing a car on blocks is to take the weight off of the suspension. I am wondering the reasoning of this method of storage.

I would put the blocks under the frame.

That's good to hear, it probably was stored improperly then. I'll have to try Kaisers method for the drums when I get up to the property the car is at now. I had always thought that cars were put on blocks to help protect the tires and rims, that's good to know, thanks for clearing it up.

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Had a chance to swing by the house where the car is staying and took a couple parts back with me to try to clean up. One of which is the 3 hubcaps I have with the car. I wanted to clean off the rust that was inside them using a wirebrush and use a dremel with a polishing brush attached to clean/buff the chrome. You can see what happened from here.

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The original chrome on them is almost 85% underneath all that calcification or grime or whatever you want to call it. I'll be working on these some more this next weekend and I'll update it with pictures of the results.

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  • 1 month later...

Alright, just graduated with a BS in elec and comp. engineering tech and have some free time to start working on the car again. Here are some pictures of the hubcap I was restoring and you can see that underneath the rust and corrosion the chrome is still decent. Not as good as I had hoped but still good nonetheless.

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One thing that excited me was on the back of the hubcap the rust was pretty bad in some spots but after sanding it down I found out that the metal underneath was still pristine you just had to grind down enough to get to it. You can see here:

mzOU4l.jpg

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Dont get to carried away with grinding away rust on parts that have to be chromed, you might think you are helping it by removing the rust but you are in fact removing metal which will make the part appear wavy or dented if you ever do get around to having the part re-chromed.

When/if you do send it to the rechromer he will dip the parts to remove all of the crap that needs to be removed

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Dont get to carried away with grinding away rust on parts that have to be chromed, you might think you are helping it by removing the rust but you are in fact removing metal which will make the part appear wavy or dented if you ever do get around to having the part re-chromed.

When/if you do send it to the rechromer he will dip the parts to remove all of the crap that needs to be removed

I hear you about being over-zealous. I'm just using a dremel with a wire brush to polish the chrome side. For the inside though i'm trying to get rid of the rust that's all over there.

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Once you are done playing around with polishing you may want to buy a can of clear paint spray avail from anywhere ( practically ) that your budget will allow. It will keep things nice and shiny and prevent further corrosion for a long long time as long as its not banged and chipped off

Harbor freight sells a very nice sandblast cabinet that would make the job much easier, approx or less than 200 bucks will buy it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Was able to head up to the valley where my car is being stored right now. Didn't have time to do anything major so I decided just to spin the radiator fan and get it on video this time. You can see that air is flowing through the carb when I spin the fan.

This should mean that there is compression in the cylinders right?

Edit** learned that it means at least one cylinder is compressing. Only way to be sure is to perform a compression test on all of the cylinders after I get a working starter.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Bout the only thing I would do is take the spark plugs out and put in about couple oz. motor oil.

I was thinking the same thing, really wish I had a garage to put this in. Had some time to start working with some of the severe rust spots and figured I'd add some pictures.

1VkHcl.jpg4Pp8al.jpgjIvPel.jpg6be4Dl.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
Looks great, is that laquer rattle can primer?

If it is than be carefull because it will absorb moisture pretty easily and may cause some addit. damage.

What would be the best way to keep moisture from affecting the metal then? I thought the primer would cap it. Also, this would protect it from UV damage right?

Edited by 1940_Dodge (see edit history)
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Yes as far as I know any of these rattle can ( and most of not all Laquer ) primers no matter how you spray them will absorb moisture pretty quickly. Best is to maybe top coat it temporarily with some sort of paint even if that again is only from a rattle can.

BTW urethane primers are not a whole lot better but they can be left longer without paint. Ive driven stuff fore months/years with only urethane primer and never had much of a problem.

Even a cleat rattle can clear would suffice but may be cheaper to just buy some gray or flat black paint and hose it down.

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