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basic questions on a 1911 roadster--gas/oil tank pump


Guest scout
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Recent purchase so need basic info 1911 runabout w mods---Take a look at pics of areas we are interested in finding out more---

Swiss manufacture it,

French hoard it,

Italians squander it,

Americans say it's money

Hindus say it does not exist,

You know what I say-

I say time is a crook--

peter lorre 1954

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notice muffler in 1st set of pics---this is just plain weird. Then 2 petcocks on gas tank---it is divided. Tank has "gas" stamped and "oil" too.

Next set od pics--2 studs with nuts out of block---what gives---hand pump seems to work--but what for?

last set shows hand stamp engine# and modified distributor. is this the spot for distributor?

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Scout, the hand pump is most likely used to pressurize the gas tank. The normal tanks just feed by gravity. This is a common modification on speedsters that adds a nice touch. I can only guess at the reason for two holes in the block in front of the carburetor. It could be a repair or it could have been a spot for an external oil pump (non-Ford issue), but I'm speculating. The hand stamped serial number is most likely an attempt by a previous owner to make the car more of a 1911 than is actually is. As far as the second petcock on the tank, the photos don't show where the lines go from the oil side. You should be aware that this tank is not Ford issue, but an aftermarket tank. For a speedster, it adds a nice touch, but Ford never put a two chamber tank on any body style. The oil side typically went to the crankcase to supply extra oil to the engine. The muffler is a set of cans that is wrapped with an asbestos like material and is typical of original style mufflers of the period. As far as the distributor, Ford never used a distributor system on Model T's, but rather, a set of 4 coils and a timer on the end of the cam shaft. I've had Model T's for over 30 years and I prefer the distributor for reliability. (Here comes the jabs from the purists) You have a Volkswagon distributor that is supplied by the aftermarket parts suppliers and is very reliable. It is in the correct location. Bottom line, your car is a very nice speedster with some very desirable accessories and I would not change a thing. Enjoy it....

Frank

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Good looking & Fun car - the lights are 13-14 and I suspect the engine is much later than 1911 as the SN should be where the timing gear sticks out - the pic is a little blury, but it looks like a casting date of 4-17-14 beside the VIN - which is in the ballpark for the engine number and would match the lights. Car also has a later model NH carb - much more reliable than the earlier ones and easier to get parts for. The downside is that your car is not an 11, but it is just as fun...

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