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Mssr. Bwatoe

OK, HOW OLD ARE YOU?? FUTURE OF LZOC

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In nine weeks I'll be hitting 70 and with 54 years of being a car freak behind me, I have seen many of the brand and make specific clubs begin to suffer in membership and participation. It would seem the "muscle car" era cars are the focal point of interest these days, and in ten years even those cars will become more rare and too costly for the younger crowd to buy.

I just acquired a low mileage, pristine '78 Lincoln Continental Town Car and while it got a lot of lookers on my drive to its new home in Texas from Eastern Tennessee where I picked it up most of those who really wanted to look at the car anywhere I stopped were well over 50. As someone mentioned cars tend to follow those who remember the times in which they were produced. Of course with due respect to the younger folks, you know it has to be boring has hell for them to hit a club meeting or gathering where everyone looks like their parents or grandparents and retell the same stories month after month after month. Hell I find that becomes a bore. In truth, club shows and meets can even become a bit boring when the same folks show up with the same car month after month or year after year.

If some of the brand clubs are to be saved in part or whole we need to find a way to get them out of "Granny" mode. Sorry, but I do see most clubs and many club functions as being in "Granny" mode and less than exciting.

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Let me put my .02¢ worth in here as well.

The truth is that the face of America has changed and so has their attitude. The people buying cars these days have a instant throwaway no fuss laid back lifestyle. When did whitewalls start disappearing?

It isn't only cars as I live in a historic neighborhood in our city and own one of the oldest houses there (turns 200-years old this New Years) and we have an ongoing battle now with the attitude of city hall to protect these properties. They want to modernize and combine style elements geared towards the 20-something crowds - not true to the original facades and change interiors to no fuss convenience to fit their lifestyles.

Then of course there is the economy. Antique cars are expensive and lets face it... though we don't feel our age we are well over antique status ourselves. Cars we could have purchased back in the 1960s or 1970s dirt cheap are now almost unapproachable to find in pristine or sound condition.

Remember when our grandparents use to talk about the good old days - probably the 1920s or 1930s? We are those grandparents now and the kids driving, to them the "old days" is the 1980s. Geezzz. How many Ford Pinto's do you see at antique car shows let alone the road?

Eric

Well the issues are that the cars are not desirable to a younger age group, nor are they able to buy them due to the astronomical prices for the cars and parts. The younger generations also have no memory of these cars, nor sentimentality. Those are the issues.
Edited by X-Frame (see edit history)

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All great points. I think there is not so much a lack of "gearheads" in the younger generations (myself being one of them, comparatively), but they just don't dig our cars. I see dozens of students tooling around my local college campus in tricked-out rides. I feel they're no different from hot rodders in the 50s and 60s. Sure, I may cringe at the giant tailpipes and assinine colors and decals, but really it's the same mentality.

What we gotta do is just convince them that if they're going to spend that much time and money on a car, might as well be one with history.

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Problem is that they will take a low production and often rare car and strip it down as well as alter the body to make a custom ride. That doesn't help the playing field who wants one that is stock.

Those rat cars and hot rods from the 1950s-1960s were done from basically junk cars with little value. Today people are tricking out cars otherwise would be worth money as antiques. I saw one not long ago purchased from a auction... a car that would have earned points at a show totally restored bone stock. The new owner promptly tossed the chassis and engine and began doing a full blown custom and chopped job of it... OUCH!

All great points. I think there is not so much a lack of "gearheads" in the younger generations (myself being one of them, comparatively), but they just don't dig our cars. I see dozens of students tooling around my local college campus in tricked-out rides. I feel they're no different from hot rodders in the 50s and 60s. Sure, I may cringe at the giant tailpipes and assinine colors and decals, but really it's the same mentality.

What we gotta do is just convince them that if they're going to spend that much time and money on a car, might as well be one with history.

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Well, it is up to us to move the LZOC forward. We are the future of the Club. We are the future Dave Cole's, etc. Jimmy, JB, et all ... we are the future!

Rick Gregg

Elkhorn, NE

PS. Go Buckeyes and HUSKERS!

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Well, it is up to us to move the LZOC forward. We are the future of the Club. We are the future Dave Cole's, etc. Jimmy, JB, et all ... we are the future!

Rick Gregg

Elkhorn, NE

PS. Go Buckeyes and HUSKERS!

You might well be part of the future should you accidentally find a bit of humility!

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53 last May. My 48 conv. coupe is the only Lincoln I own. Have a bunch of other cars, Working on a 32 Buick rumble seat coupe (all original) and a 1969 Dodge Daytona right now.

Most all of the other cars are done and sit around until its their turn to be driven.

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45 and are having the 39 LZ I saved from the scrap (not junk but scrap!) yard painted. But part of the problem is finding sound advice on these old cars. I have a 56 Mark II and there is a lot of info and parts out there but in even trying to find out a paint mix code for Coach Maroon has been a weeks long track to nowhere so far.

That said I think the thirties cars are hitting the same wall the brass era stuff hit in the 80's - if you want to fix it invest in machine tools or pay through the nose... But I am still going to keep the 12 even thought the engine gets dogged by the flathead 8 guys :)

Next on the list to find (after a valid paint code) a Columbia 2spd rear end!

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After recuperating for the past eight months due to a destroyed shoulder I am back working on my 1948 Continental Coupe. I got a full days work in on it Saturday and it was great to work on it again. I just turned 70 and have been messing with old cars since 1955, back then Model A's. I am reducing my collection down to manageable size so I can get the Connie up and running before I depart Germany. My WWII Sd Kfz 222 Armored Car was purchased by the August Horch Museum in Zwickau so I will have some room in my work Hall again. The Heinkel Kabine and DKW four-door departed early October. I think that there will be a future for us as I have seen a lot of young folks that are very interested in the Lincoln's. Harry

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I am 46 and a member of four car clubs. The earlier comment about "Granny Mode" is what I find in all of the clubs I belong. Only about 10% of the members participate and it is always the same members. However, to defend those 10%, there would be no club activities or meets especially on a local level with out these dedicated members. Usually, 100% of the work it takes to run a club is done by 5 to 10% of its members. Everyone else gets a free ride. I've done my time as a Board member on a couple of other clubs and done my share. But, political stuff and egos get in the way and the fun gets lost.

The internet including forums like ours have impacted club participation. Remember when you went to meet to speak to a person and view their car or part of their car to answer a question you had? Now we just put up a post and receive a picture. It is convenient, but it hinders the in-person social interaction.

Edited by Paul K. (see edit history)

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I have a 56 Mark II and there is a lot of info and parts out there but in even trying to find out a paint mix code for Coach Maroon has been a weeks long track to nowhere so far.

Next on the list to find (after a valid paint code) a Columbia 2spd rear end!

Try these guys. They know where to point you on the mix:

http://markiiforum.com/

Eric

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75. I bought my first Lincoln Continental in 1972 when you could find a Lincoln in a junk yard now and then. The price of parts was always high as my wallet recalls, but the parts have never been abundant. I have attended the Eastern Swap meets since the early 70's, my first being at the Zimmerman Holiday Inn just off the PA Turnpike at the Lebonon exit. I left the LCOC after 35 years of membership because they seem to have forgotten that 10 year old cars are not antiques. I like the minutia that Dave Cole gets into. I would like to see more hands on in the tech articles also. I sold my first Lincoln 3 years ago and still have 2 more in the garage, but the high cost of these cars and the present economy has reduced the number of big boys who want or can afford the big toys.

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I will be 38 next month. I've been in the LZOC since 1999 when I bought a fairly orginal 40 sedan from a friend of mine's grandfather. I still have the car and work on it whenever I get the chance. I've tried to attend a few of the GOF's whenever I can and I've met most of the guys that have been with the LZOC for a long time. They have been very kind to me and have offered all kinds of knowledge when I've asked for help. As for the future of LZOC, I would love to be a part of it but my biggest problem is that the cars are just so expensive these days. I would love to have another Zephyr or two but the costs of a good example are beyond my reach. Nevertheless, my sedan will keep me busy for years to come. I hope the LZOC can generate a new generation of Zephyr lovers that want to honor the tradition of these great cars.

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Well, it is up to us to move the LZOC forward. We are the future of the Club. We are the future Dave Cole's, etc. Jimmy, JB, et all ... we are the future!

Rick Gregg

Elkhorn, NE

PS. Go Buckeyes and HUSKERS!

Spot on Rick! Hope all is well -

JB

Edited by Jim Zephyr (see edit history)

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Well, I have done my best with my old cars, and the limited budget I am working with as a 23 year old grad student. My Continental may not have the original 12 cyl in it (it has a merc flathead v-8 put in sometime during the 50's or early 60's) but, I have done my best to keep the interior up (though it is deteriorating due to the heat it was in for many years) I have also kept the paint up (it is about 40-50 years old, some rust, but, what can you do?). Same thing with the others. But, I have a zeal for the classic cars, where many my age do not, I am willing to put my extra $ into an old car rather than a flat screen tv or some other waste. Young people willing to do this are rare and far between...

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Well I just turned 55, (being a newbie here). I have had my 42 LC Coupe for over 20 yrs. Have been a inactive member with LZOC off & on for a while now. Just getting enthused again with the old gal (the car, not my wife), would like to get involved more with the club, as I know alot of familar names from years past are passing or getting able to do less & less for there clubs. Quite sad to see!. I did drop my membership with the LCOC about 8-10yrs ago, after I was unable to show my 71 MK III at a West. meet after unforunately I was about an hour past the entry time to put it on the field, ( it was quite a long drive for me), anyway kind of ticked me off. I would like to attend the West. LZOC if held in OR, but I see where its also listed in the LCOC website that it is to be held in CA, will see. Its hard for some of the West coast guys (I think) who are still working for a living (not retired yet, if ever) to get to active in these clubs because most everything takes place several states away. Would love to go to the LZOC winter swap meet, but can't go to PA. Anyway just my thoughts on the club, no compaints, I understand why events are held where more of the members can attend, besides the weather is so much better in CA than our wet Pac. NW weather! Take care

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Well I just turned 55, (being a newbie here). I have had my 42 LC Coupe for over 20 yrs. Have been a inactive member with LZOC off & on for a while now. Just getting enthused again with the old gal (the car, not my wife), would like to get involved more with the club, as I know alot of familar names from years past are passing or getting able to do less & less for there clubs. Quite sad to see!. I did drop my membership with the LCOC about 8-10yrs ago, after I was unable to show my 71 MK III at a West. meet after unforunately I was about an hour past the entry time to put it on the field, ( it was quite a long drive for me), anyway kind of ticked me off. I would like to attend the West. LZOC if held in OR, but I see where its also listed in the LCOC website that it is to be held in CA, will see. Its hard for some of the West coast guys (I think) who are still working for a living (not retired yet, if ever) to get to active in these clubs because most everything takes place several states away. Would love to go to the LZOC winter swap meet, but can't go to PA. Anyway just my thoughts on the club, no compaints, I understand why events are held where more of the members can attend, besides the weather is so much better in CA than our wet Pac. NW weather! Take care

You have accurately described the "curse" so to speak of being West of the Mississippi where everything can be quite a distance from anywhere. Many of us don't even have a local club organization of any nature close enough to attend monthly events/meetings without it being an over night issue. Realistically spending $250 or more each month for motel rooms, fuel, and meals to attend club meetings and events is not logical for anyone who is not retired and verging on being sloppy rich.

Thank goodness we have the Internet that allows us to stay in contact with other vintage car owners and provides an avenue for finding information and parts we need.

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Glad to see I'm not the youngest in this group, as I'll be hitting the big (so they say) four-oh early next year.. I plan on keeping my '47 LC Convertible as stock as possible for as long as possible (as long as I'm able to find the parts and knowledge to do so)... Though my good friend, and previous owner of the car was a member of the LZOC, LCOC, and the CCCA I have yet to join during the four years I've owned the car... Mostly because of the expense involved, but also because I felt I was not the "target audience" for those clubs...

this forum has been my lincoln club, I don't speak up often, but I can usually search and find the answer to any question I've yet to have...

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21 here--new to the forum and AACA. I'm certainly not at the point in my life where I can afford a classic car of my own, but I have a passion for them (always have). After college and grad school I will start to think about actually purchasing one, then two, then three... :cool: The first classic I do buy will be a Lincoln, I know that for a fact.

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Hi there Im 43 and from Stockholm Sweden

Just bought myself a 1938 Lincoln Zephyr that needs a lot of work.

I think it Will take 7-8 years if I can find the parts I need.

I Will recive my car in februari I hope.

I need:

Grille

Fender skirts

Rear trunk for a 3w coupe

Seat for a 3w coupe

I may be coming over for the turkey Rod run

Stay cool

Jocke Sandberg

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I am 27, and while what I have is some certainly unique ideas, I would love to own and restore one of the classics. Hot rods are kool, don't get me wrong, but they have their place. I recently ran into a couple here in SOCAL that is the second owners of a model A, yeah, I thought huh? how is that possible? car was sold here in cali and the couple still drives it regularly, and it is in great shape. I would love to be able to how off one of these beauties to my kids when I get to be old and gray, and I don't mean as just a sunday driver.:cool:

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Guest LINCOLNBIRDS

hi guys my father is 84 a charter menber of both lcoc and lzoc i am 52 and have been dragged around to many lincoln meets

i have just bought a 40 conv love it paul willson

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