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Waukesha Engines In Cars

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The Waukesha Engine Historical Society is working on a list of cars that used Waukesha engines; it appears the company records do not include a complete list of engine purchasers. While my engine interest is primarily truck etc installations I do have the following car list:

Fawick Flyer AKA Silent Sioux 1908-12, which used a 2 and a 4 cyl, the 4cyl a Wauk, the 2cyl??

Illinois 1909-12; the (a?) 1911 model used a 4cyl Wauk. About 50 cars produced total.

Kendalville 1910 (Rupp Bros.) Apparently a prototype only, or very few, with a 4cyl Wauk.

Multiplex 1912-13, using a 4cyl 50HP Wauk. About 14 produced.

Rupp 1910. Almost certainly the Kendalville above.

Wright 1910-11, using a 4cyl 20HP Wauk; six built?

All of the above are from the Std Cat US Cars, but there are literally hundreds of entries with no engine maker mentioned.

While the list of truck users would be quite long, and other installations almost literally endless, can anyone here add to the above list??? (The early Crosley 2cyl was, of course, a Wauk, the "150" per several references, but opinions differ).

My apologies if there's an online list somewhere; my computers sick and gets into websites OK, usually, but doesn't search well. Many thxx!! Bud

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I suggest you ask Rickardo Consulting Engineers in England. (Sorry I cannot remember the name of the location on the Channel coast south of London, but it is where King Charles II managed to escape in a small boat to the safety of France when Cromwell's trops were scouring the country to terminate him.) Harry Horning of Waukesha and Sir Harry Rickardo were great friends, and he held the licence for USA for Rickardo's patent for the high efficiency, high compression combustion chamber design for L-head side valve engines. He had a lot of difficulty collecting royalty payments from some large companies. You may find that some of the information you need is in Rickardo's records, although not the very early engines.

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I have a copy of The Specification Book for US Cars 1920-1929. There is no mention of Waukesha in the list of abbreviations of component supplier names, so I assume from that that no US maker of the 1920s used Waukesha engines.

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Many thxx for quick replies!!

Early car engines were never a primary interest, and when the independent US engine makers did pique my fickle interest I re-acquired a batch of older parts catalogs to ID truck etc engines; those that included cars, late teens, 20's etc, listed no Wauks, altho several were listed as "own" that apparently acquired engines somewhere else.

It would appear any Wauk usage would be in the early years that my stuff doesn't cover; any applicable early car ref's I once had I've since disposed of when thinning out the paper collection, and now limited income and higher prices make re-acquiring much difficult!

Again, many thxx!!

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(The early Crosley 2cyl was, of course, a Wauk, the "150" per several references, but opinions differ).

What sort of verification would you like to verify the engine in the early Crosley was indeed a Waukesha?? I have several references from Waukesha, pictures of ID tags, engine manuals from Waukesha, etc. I'll be happy to provide copies of whatever you would like.

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Dave: My apologies for not being clearer in my post; there's no argument that the 2 Cyl was indeed a Wauk...the difference of opinion I mentioned was as to the designation "150". Some parts books show it as "150" while others do not, and I've not checked with the Hist Soc as whether it was in fact the "150" or a variation.

Many thxx for your offer of assistance.

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The description from Waukesha that I have has a number of names used. My understanding is that there were 2 variations of the same engine, a 13.5 HP and a "detuned" 12 HP later. I have several booklets from Waukesha on the engine if you need doccumentation. Your note was pretty clear....I just read it wrong. Any way I can help, I will be happy to do so.

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I am aware that you are asking for cars with Waukesha engine but I could add that International Harvester Corporation used 4 cylinder models XA 200 and XA 222 in their Special Delivery light trucks in the mid to late 20's. They continued to use this series through to the D2 in the mid 30's.

Regards

Al

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Al: Yes, IH also used the XAH (reportedly a heavy duty XA variation) up thru 37 per my catalogs, and the FC and FK up into 1940 on their C5 and D5.

While I've never asked the Hist Soc, my impression was that Wauk decided pretty early on to stay with the lower-speed higher torque industrial engine (trucks, tractors, all kinds of eqpmt, etc, including heavy 1000cid + engines) developing their HP lower on the RPM curve rather than get into the lighter higher-speed automotive engines that were slowly winding up tighter and tighter (higher RPM).

On those engine designations: my understanding is XA is the basic engine--the following number is works code for accessories (ign, carb, clutch etc) and possibly sometimes end-used code (another point I've never verified with the Hist Soc).

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The only difference I can say I have noticed between the XA200 and 222 in the light trucks is the spark plug spacing, evenly spaced on the 200 and two groups of two in the 222. Equipment remained much the same with the exception of the carb. This changed from what I think was a Zenith V4B to a Zenith, more like the one fitted to a Ford A but without the adjustable jet.

IH also used Waukeshas in hay balers and headers, the model 22 baler had quite a small 4 cyl. engine.

Al

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