Sign in to follow this  
Seldenguy

Wooden frame Maxwells

Recommended Posts

I have just read a 1906 sales brochure for the '06 models which I received from the Horseless Carriage club library. A paragraph of note is as follows:

"Maxwell cars have lived up to their promise, and it is with a feeling of satisfaction that the Maxwell-Briscoe Motor Company is able to point to the fact that in 1906 the changes in the two 1905 models are only such changes as are included in a refinement of detail and the strengthening of some parts in which slight weaknesses developed."

My thoughts are that it is early "Madison Avenue Hype" and a reference to the '05 wooden frame changed to steel for 1906 with the key word being "strengthening". Other thoughts anyone? --Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob ,I think "one could read anything they wanted into that statement".But I also think you are right on about the frame improvement. Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not familiar with this Maxwell point, but my own opinion would be that if a m'f'r admits a "slight weakness", there were probably broken or collapsed Maxwells littering every street in town...

I could be wrong: Std Cat, while not the ultimate reference, doesn't mention any frame problems in this period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been looking at this particular issue over the past year or so. By Jan 1906 cars had pressed steel frames as press pictures show. Also there are quite a few articles, including show report photos, up to March 1905 that mention armored oak frames. As late as Nov 1905, the Autocar in the UK states that the chassis was armored.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further thoughts,

In doing research over the years , I found an article that mentioned , that the 1905 H touring model had undersized front spring horns, bending under use, ( thus these were made larger for the 1906 model) The H frame was always pressed steel from the beginning of production , the L was armored oak until later being changed to pressed steel as well ....reason???? maybe just economics, maybe Maxwell in an effort to get going they began with wood in their lighter cars , than switched to pressed steel after getting things going??? I have seen several examples of the early wood frames maxwells ,all are holding up well, another article also mentioned that with the poor roads of the day , the light car would twist somewhat causing the sheet metal (which was nailed to the underside of the wooden frame) to tear, this may have been another reason to go all steel also.

Edited by muledeer (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this