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Repairing brake lines


Guest SwiftBuicks

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Guest SwiftBuicks

Hi folks!!! I haven't been coming to this forum for a while because my Buicks are running well. However, I am having trouble with my '94 Toyota 4runner. It developed a brake line leak on a line that runs from the front of the vehicle to the rear. It's covered by the gas tank and every other part that lies under the body. Is it possible to fix the leak without replacing the whole line?

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Probably...... they make splice fitting for both steel and plastic lines. Most pressure lines are steel.

If there is room, you could run a section of steel line over the tank so that it extends on both ends. Cut the existing line and use the splice fitting to install the new line.

The real life answer is nothing goes that smoothly...... you will probably need to drop the tank, pull the defective line and add a section of new line where the old one is rusted.

You may want to disconnect the old line so you can blow it out after the cutting and splicing.

Good luck

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Guest SwiftBuicks

After wasting three hours or more grovelling under the vehicle yesterday when the weather was perfect for almost anything, I have decided to go the difficult route and replace both lines front to back. If I obtain pre-bent lines from the Manufacturer they will be hard to install, but bending them yourself isn't really the best way to go. Since the vehicle is a '94 and the tank 17 years old I'm wondering if I should replace it as well. Whatever, at least if I take it down, I can inspect it and loosen any frozen bolts.

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Lube everything with Rustbuster first.Remove anything in the way of the replacement of the rusted out lines.Purchase replacement lines with the ends flared buy extra UNIONS to connect these lines. Replacement lines come in straight lenghts with the ends flared.Cut the old lines off slide on the Ferrel {I think that is what it is called} then use a flaring tool. There are bending tools but the lines can be bent by hand.

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There are different types of flares.Bubble flares use a different type of ferrel.And you need a bubble flairing tool. You have metric and standard threads too.Buy extra fittings and tubing that way you will have what you need and then return the unused items.Bring the fittings that are on the auto,to test the threads,and to match up .Using the correct tools and wrenches,vice grips will distort the brass fittings.The lines must be properly run so they will not get damaged .

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