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Kingston made carburetors from about 1900 up through about WWII.

Early in their existance, they sold to a few car manufacturers (the Ford model T is the best known). However, they had more marine, industrial, and tractor customers that passenger car.

Lots of different models of Kingston.

Jon.

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As far as Kingston carbs go, it just doesn't get much better than this. This is a "Five-Ball" carburetor for a 1909 Model T Ford. (The 1910-11 versions of this carburetor had a choke in the air inlet tube; unlike your carburetor.) I believe these carbs were used on a few other makes as well, such as the one-cylinder Brush. These are not easy to find.

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jim5618

The carb that is pictured may very well be for an early Brush, Model T, or many other early engines. One way to tell is to verify the dimensions of the inlet flange (diameter of the opening and center to center dimension of the two bolt holes), and the diameter of the carb body. The dimensions would have to mate up with intake manifolds and there are different sizes depending on engine sizes. I have a Brush that has a later model T carb, but the later carb ran smoother that the early versions. Nice picture, keep us posted.

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The so-called "5 ball Kingston" is actually a Kingston model E. The Kingston Model E was produced in nine (9) different flange sizes, as well as several (don't remember the exact number) of pipe sizes (pipe threads were used instead of a mounting flange).

There was even a dual fuel (10 ball) version of the model E. The dual fuel had 2 float bowls (one for kerosene, the other for gasoline).

Pretty difficult to exactly identify one of these strictly from pictures. This one does at least resemble the 1909 Model T Ford; but it resembles many others as well. The center to center bolt spacing will narrow the field significantly, but still not a positive ID.

Jon.

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  • 2 years later...
Anyone heard of these? My dad has one. It is old and brass. I can post a picture later.:)

I had, (sold on E-Bay), a brass carburetor similar to yours, that I wish I still had hanging, on the wall of the garage.

Nice patina and hard to find. They make a pretty wall hanger.

Bill H

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I had, (sold on E-Bay), a brass carburetor similar to yours, that I wish I still had hanging, on the wall of the garage.

Nice patina and hard to find. They make a pretty wall hanger.

I know the feeling, Bill.. I once sold a pair of brass carbs for the Hudson Super Six, which were gorgeous sculpture in their own right.

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  • 2 weeks later...
The early John Deere D tractor, mid 20's, used a Kingston similar to that. Dandy Dave!

Dave, the early Deeres used Schebler carburetors, same as the two cylinder Hart Parr tractors.

In fact Hart Parr used them to the end of production.

post-93523-143142157997_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

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